Tuesday Mar 10, 2015

New Java Champion: Tom Schindl

Congratulations to the new Java Champion Tom Schindl! 

Tom Schindl is an Austrian Java Software developer working on the Eclipse Platform and the JavaFX integration named e(fx)clipse. He's a member of the Eclipse Platform team and part of the team who designed and implemented the Eclipse 4 platform. He is also the CTO of BestSolution, a company specialized in Eclipse and JavaFX consulting for companies around the world.

Tom is a regular speaker at EclipseCon (Europe and NA) and JavaOne where he talks about Eclipse, JavaFX and how to develop modern applications with JavaFX and Eclipse. He authored an SWT prototype which uses JavaFX instead of the native UI-Toolkit. 

Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders who are community-nominated. Learn more about Java Champions

Tuesday Feb 17, 2015

Free Open Source Tools for Maven, HTML5, IoT, and Java EE

Are you struggling with being productive in Maven, HTML5 frameworks such as AngularJS, IoT hardware such as the Raspberry Pi, or Java EE? Do you want free, easy to use, out-of-the-box tools for quickly and efficiently developing all kinds of applications? You really need to give the NetBeans IDE a whirl! At the next Virtual Technology Summit,  OTN will show you the latest enhancements and cool features of the free, open-source NetBeans IDE, which are used around the world, from engineers at Boeing and NASA to Java architects such as James Gosling and Stuart Marks! This is one of four Java sessions of the OTN Virtual Technology Day. Other topics include JavaScript on the JVM, Java Application Monitoring and Java Wearables.

If you haven't looked at the NetBeans IDE lately, you'll be blown away by the fast speed and performance enhancements. If you are completely new to the NetBeans IDE, see how easy it is to get started and be productive. For example, did you know NetBeans can refactor all your code from Java SE 7 to Java SE 8? See how in this session, lead by NetBeans expert Geertjan Wielenga.

Virtual Technology Summits (VTS) are interactive, online events, sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). VTSs are free, but you must register:

 • EMEA – 25 February  - 9:00 to 13:00 BST  REGISTER

APAC – 4 March  –  9:30 to 13:30 IST  REGISTER

Each OTN VTS features four technical tracks, each with a unique focus on specific tools, technologies, and tips: Java, Database, Middleware and Systems. Registration allows you to attend any session on any track. We'll kick off the VTS with Java Community Update by Tori Wieldt. There will be places to hang out and meet other attendees between sessions. Please join us!

Monday Sep 22, 2014

Join NetBeans Community at JavaOne

Geertjan Wielenga is a NetBeans product manager working at Oracle, focused on Java and HTML5 development with NetBeans IDE and the NetBeans Platform. He is a Java technology enthusiast primarily interested in Java desktop technologies—in particular, application development on the NetBeans Platform. Wielenga tweets at @NetBeans and @geertjanw and blogs at https://blogs.oracle.com/geertjan/ 

Q: Tell us about NetBeans Community Day

Wielenga: NetBeans Community Day features the NetBeans community from around the world. Thirty speakers will share their expertise in six panels on popular NetBeans topics. The first theme is about the NetBeans partner activities. On the panel, Anton Arhipov from ZeroTurnaround, Ruslan Synytsky from Jelastic, and Matthew Tahvonen from Vaadim will present their new NetBeans plugins. Bruce Shimel from Boeing will explain the use of NetBeans in their open source community. 

[Read More]

Friday Sep 19, 2014

Robots, NetBeans IDE, and Raspberry Pi with James Gosling

James Gosling is now chief software architect of the Wave Glider, the flagship product at Liquid Robotics. The Wave Glider is a self-propelled, autonomous marine robot that collects and transmits ocean data. The Wave Glider will be on display exclusively at the Java Hub in the JavaOne exhibit hall during the entire conference. 

Since Gosling started at Liquid Robotics, he has re-architected the onboard software and refined a data-as-a-service cloud to provide direct, real-time access to ocean information. Java, which he invented, has played an increasing role in ocean data transmission and analysis.  

“Being able to debug and profile robots out at sea is a truly life-altering experience,” Gosling explains. He uses a set of tools—consisting of editors, debuggers, and profilers—that are part of the NetBeans IDE. At the JavaOne 2014 NetBeans Community Day, he will present the session “James Gosling, Robots, the Raspberry Pi, and Small Devices” [UGF8907] on Sunday, September 28. He will also present “Debugging and Profiling Robots with James Gosling” [CON6699] on Wednesday, October 1. Geertjan Wielenga, Mark Heckler, José Pereda, Johannes Weigend, Shai Almog and Jens Deters will join him to discuss those two topics. 

Join him as he closes out the JavaOne Community keynote with a fun, historical perspective of the genesis of Java, and a T-shirt toss! The Community Keynote will be held in the Marriott Marquis, Salon 7/8/9, on Thursday, October 2, 2014

Thursday Jul 31, 2014

Tech Article: Learning Java Programming with BlueJ

When you talk with people about learning to program, and especially learning to program in Java, the BlueJ environment is often mentioned as a good introductory environment to get started. BlueJ is a free Java Development Environment designed for beginners, used by millions worldwide. It is also is an excellent environment in which to gain a good understanding of fundamental principles of object-oriented programming.

Author Micheal Kölling explains "When asked why beginners should not just start by using Eclipse or NetBeans— environments known for their excellent toolset and great functionality—the answer typically points to the great value of BlueJ’s simplicity and interactivity for gaining a thorough understanding of programming principles."

Learn more by reading "Interactive Objects with BlueJ."

BlueJ

Author Michael Kölling is a professor at the School of Computing, University of Kent, in Canterbury, England. His research interests are in the areas of object-oriented systems, software tools, programming languages, computing education, and HCI. He is the author of two Java textbooks and is the lead developer of BlueJ and Greenfoot.

Tuesday May 13, 2014

Technical Article: Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE

Check out the technical article "Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE" on OTN. This article shows how to use NetBeans IDE 7.4 to develop a Swing-based "to-do" application, and it demonstrates the use of a rich client platform (RCP). 

The example application builds a to-do list, which is commonly found as part of privileged identity management (PIM) suites. The article doesn't just demo the NetBeans IDE's RCP features; it also sticks to object-oriented best practices, showing that you can develop GUI applications quickly and interactively without compromising long-term maintenance and a sound architecture.

Along the way, you'll take the NetBeans IDE visual editor through its paces. Also, you can learn many features that NetBeans IDE provides to increase developer productivity. 

Author Ioannis (John) Kostaras is a software architect and has been a Java developer since JDK 1.0. Kostaras has developed a number of standalone and web applications focusing on flexible object-oriented design and security. One such RCP application, written in NetBeans, was awarded the 2012 Duke's Choice Community Choice Award. (Kostaras reminded us that he is co-organizing "the hottest Java conference on earth," JCrete.) This technical article is an update of "A Complete App Using NetBeans 5" by Fernando Lozano, which was originally published in NetBeans Magazine.

Read "Build a Rich Client Platform To-Do Application in NetBeans IDE" now.

Tuesday Apr 01, 2014

WetClipserJ: A New Kind of Tool for Java Developers

Oracle is proud to announce a brand new category of tool for developers: an Integrated Development Environment. WetclipserJ is not just a code editor, but a super code editor! "This is an area that's been previously unexplored, and we know developers are going to love it," said Lead Evangelist Peter Redienhcsztu. 

WetclipserJ provides code analyzers, sizers, and editors for working with all the latest technologies. It also has a range of new enhancements--which is pretty remarkable, considering this is the first release.  

"I went to Google to figure out what to work on next, and it started finishing my queries for me, so I thought, maybe you can do the same thing with code!" explained Imperial Grand Chief TopGuy Mark Dlohnier. "I went to take out my trash," said Engineer Architect BuilderGuy Brian Ztoeg, "and thought…nevermind." Director John Illeraccec-Noilluj expects adding functionality to this new tool in later releases, such as code templates, coding tips, and refactoring tools. Perhaps even deploying to an app server with one click! Wisely, WetclipserJ only supports Java. Multi-language support just doesn't make sense in a world where developers rarely use more than one language. "I say, pick the best and you stick with it!" exclaimed Illeraccec-Noilluj.

"We like to call this new type of tool an I-D-E, but it may take a while for that acronym to catch on." Redienhcsztu explained.

WetclipserJ (Artist's Rendering)


See what these community members say about WetclipserJ:

"It's great to see Oracle listening to the developer community with regards to developer needs...but what about *my* needs?"
-Martijn Grubrev

<head slap>"Why didn't I think of that?"
-Mattias Nosslrak 

"Dare I dream for a performance analyzer in this tool?"
-Kirk Enidreppep

"Developers are hungry for a tool is so advanced it requires hours of specialized training."
-Yara Regnes  

"If you get the virtual plug in, make sure you get the training, I swiped at a fly and accidentally wiped out hours of work." 
-Bruno Azuos 

You can download WetclipserJ from OTN at the super-friendly URL of (type carefully!):

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaide/netclipserj/community/
javanet/newproducts/letsaddsomenumbers48759287/kindalonghuh/
almostthere/waitforit/downloads/index.html


Monday Mar 24, 2014

The Future of Application Development Tools at Oracle

Last week we met with Chris Tonas, Vice President of Mobility and Application Development Tools at Oracle, to hear his take on the latest in the world of Java tooling and development frameworks. 

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your role at Oracle as it relates to development tools? 

A: I lead the organization that is working on Oracle’s software development tools and frameworks, specifically, the teams that build our offerings for Java developers - whether in NetBeans, Eclipse or JDeveloper. Our team also builds the tools and frameworks that are used by developers working with Oracle’s cloud and mobile platforms.

Q: This week saw the release of JDK8 and NetBeans 8 along with it. How do you view this release? 

A: The release of JDK 8 and NetBeans 8 this week represents a big step forward for both Oracle and the Java Community. A lot of hard work and collaboration went into this milestone and I’d like to take a moment to thank everyone who contributed to this achievement. 

Q: With the new NetBeans 8.0 out, what are the plans for NetBeans going forward? 

A: In the short term, an update release of NetBeans 8 is underway to align with Java ME 8. Additional NetBeans 8 releases that target specific bugs are anticipated to be released after that. Longer term, Oracle is committed to the continued success of both Java and NetBeans. Work on JDK 9 is now underway and we’re planning a NetBeans 9 release to go along with it, as usual. 

Q: As you mentioned Oracle supports more than just the NetBeans IDE. What’s the thinking behind that? 

A: Oracle recognizes that developer tools aren’t a one-size-fits-all proposition. Oracle is a significant contributor to the Eclipse project and we are continuing to extend the capabilities of our Eclipse-based solutions as well. We offer JDeveloper for those who want the tightest alignment with the Oracle Fusion Middleware stack. In addition, we recognize that many JavaScript developers want to use light weight tools, and we are planning to address those needs as well.

Q: What are some of the key trends you see in the software development space right now? 

A: It’s clear that several significant trends are shaping software development and tools. Oracle is at the forefront of these changes and a leader in almost every aspect. We see three main changes happening right now:
  • Java remains the industry standard for server-side development, but we see growing demand to support developers using the combination of JavaScript and HTML5 for the presentation layer. We see JavaScript starting to gain ground for some server side use cases as well.
  • The shift to cloud-based deployment is now mainstream. Development for the cloud presents a new set of challenges and demands a fresh approach.
  • The third shift is the move to mobile. Mobile development must be integrated across the enterprise from the design phase throughout the lifecycle.

As the providers of tools for developers, these changes require an evolution of the tooling and infrastructure used to design and develop applications. 

Q:  So what is Oracle doing to address these developments? 

A: Some of the work has already happened. For example, NetBeans has supported the Java and JavaScript combination for a few releases now. Looking forward, Oracle has several new and innovative browser-based, cloud-centric and mobile initiatives underway that we will be sharing with the community over the next several months.

We are leveraging skills and technology from across our current developer tools organization to develop these new capabilities. We see the new generation of developer tools as complimentary to the tools that developers use and love today. The first of these initiatives that you’ll be able to use will be the forthcoming Oracle Developer Cloud Service – bringing your ALM and team collaboration work to the cloud. You can read more about it at http://cloud.oracle.com/developer 

Q: Where can developers learn more about these new tools? 

A: Just like every year, Oracle’s full vision for the future of software development will be shared at JavaOne and Oracle OpenWorld later this year. Our team is looking forward to sharing what we are working on with the development community.

Q: Thank you for your time, Chris. 

A: You're welcome.

Thursday Mar 20, 2014

Java 8, Eclipse, and the Future

Sometimes the planets just align. It was great that the Java 8 Day was at EclipseCon the day Java 8 launched.  That all the major IDEs provided Java 8 support on the day Java 8 launched was another great alignment -- thanks to everyone in the Java community that made it happen! 

Java 8 Day at EclipseCon was standing room only. Georges Saab opened the day with explaining how the Java 8 supports the basic definition of Java: it is simple, stable, fast, scalable and easy to read. Alex Buckley, Spec Lead for the Java Language & VM, described lambda expressions as "perhaps the biggest upgrade ever to the Java programming model." But Java 8 is much more than lambdas. He mentioned the new Stream API. Buckley said "The jump from Collections to Streams is larger than the jump from anonymous classes to lambda expressions." Thomas Schindl discussed JavaFX 8. Hinkmond Wong gave a great explanation of Java SE Embedded 8 Compact Profiles (slides here, stay tuned for future Java Magazine article). 

Executive Director of Eclipse Foundation, Mike Milinkovich (@mmilinkov) gave the EclipseCon keynote "Eclipse: The Next Ten Years." After discussing the history and success of Eclipse, Milinkovich provided the caveat that he does not have the power to dictate what projects will occur in the Eclipse community. "I think of my title as Chief Eclipse Cheerleader," he said. "It's a very Darwinian, bottom up process. What survives is what works," he explained.

Milinkovich talked about the trends he sees that will have an impact on developers and IDEs, and they apply to Java and the open source community as well:

Trend #1: Software is Eating the World
With a nod to Marc Andreesson, Milinkovich said that software is becoming ever more important and has an effect on everything, including how companies are valued. He gave the example of the Airbus Aircraft: the amount of software code used onboard on class of aircraft grew four times larger in three years. So should Airbus think of themselves of an airplane company or a software company? Not only is the codebase huge, but the lifespan of applications can span generations. "Would you program differently if your granddaughter will have to maintain your code?" Milinkovich asked with a smile.

Trend #2: Thing Internet of Things
What is the size of the IoT market? Is IoT a $14 Trillion market or is that hype? Whatever the number, IoT is big and will continue to grow. Most importantly, Milinkovich said, we need OPEN IoT. Eclipse has 14 projects in the IoT space, and he expects more to come. There was lots of interest in the IoT sessions at EclipseCon.

Trend #3: The Cloud
Evans Data predicts that by 2019, 65% of developers will primarily develop for cloud. Does that mean all the functionality from current desktop IDEs should be moved to the cloud? Milinkovich introduced a demo of Project Flux, showing how to connect an Eclipse project to the cloud. There were multiple sessions on developing in the cloud throughout EclipseCon. 

Java and Eclipse have both enjoyed years of great community, great technology and significant impact in the software industry. That comes from lots communication, lots of hard work, and favorable planetary alignment. 

Thursday Aug 15, 2013

Trying Out Lambda Expressions in the Eclipse IDE

A new article, now up on otn/java, by Deepak Vohra, titled “Trying Out Lambda Expressions in the Eclipse IDE,” demonstrates how to take advantage of lambda expressions in Java SE 8 using the Eclipse IDE and virtual extension methods.

Vohra begins with the basics:
“Lambda expressions, also called closures, are a short-form replacement for anonymous classes. Lambda expressions simplify the use of interfaces that declare a single abstract method, which are also called functional interfaces. In Java SE 7, a single method interface can be implemented with one of the following options.
* Create a class that implements the interface.
* Create an anonymous class.”

Vohra explains that while lambda expressions can be used to implement a functional interface without creating a class or an anonymous class, they can be used only with interfaces that declare a single method.

Benefits of lambda expressions include:
* Concise syntax
* Method references and constructor references
* Reduced runtime overhead compared to anonymous classes

Vohra gets under the hood to explain the basics of lambda syntax, along with the nature of functional interfaces and target types, offering copious examples. All in all, the article offers a first-rate primer on how to make use of lambda expressions and virtual extension methods using the Eclipse IDE.

Check out the story here.

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