Thursday Apr 12, 2012

JavaServer Faces 2.0 for the Cloud

A new article now up on otn/java by Deepak Vohra titled “JSF 2.0 for the Cloud, Part One,” shows how JavaServer Faces 2.0 provides features ideally suited for the virtualized computing resources of the cloud. The article focuses on @ManagedBean annotation, implicit navigation, and resource handling. Vohra illustrates how the container-based model found in Java EE 7, which allows portable applications to target single machines as well as large clusters, is well suited to the cloud architecture.

From the article--

“Cloud services might not have been a factor when JavaServer Faces 2.0 (JSF 2.0) was developed, but JSF 2.0 provides features ideally suited for the cloud, for example:
•    The path-based resource handling in JSF 2.0 makes handling virtualized resources much easier and provides scalability with composite components.
•    REST-style GET requests and bookmarkable URLs in JSF 2.0 support the cloud architecture. Representational State Transfer (REST) software architecture is based on transferring the representation of resources identified by URIs. A RESTful resource or service is made available as a URI path. Resources can be accessed in various formats, such as XML, HTML, plain text, PDF, JPEG, and JSON, among others. REST offers the advantages of being simple, lightweight, and fast.
•    Ajax support in JSF 2.0 is integrable with Software as a Service (SaaS) by providing interactive browser-based Web applications.”
In Part Two of the series, Vohra will examine features such as Ajax support, view parameters, preemptive navigation, event handling, and bookmarkable URLs.

Have a look at the article here.

Wednesday Sep 14, 2011

Working with Java SE 7 Exception Changes

A new article by systems architect Manfred Riem, now up on otn/java, titled “Working with Java SE 7 Exception Changes,” covers important developments in Java 7’s Project Coin, focusing on exception handling -- specifically multi-catch, rethrow, and try-with-resources. Project Coin consists of the following small language changes, which are intended to simplify common programming tasks: strings in switch statements; better integral literals; multi-catch exceptions; improved type inference for generic instance creation; try-with-resources; and simplified varargs method invocation.

From the article itself:

“The exception handling changes in Java SE 7 allow you not only to program more concisely, as demonstrated in the multi-catch examples, but they also allow you to partially handle an exception and then let it bubble up, as covered in the re-throw examples. Java SE 7 also facilitates less error-prone exception cleanup…”

Read the complete article here.

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