Thursday Sep 26, 2013

The JavaOne 2013 Java Community Keynote

by Timothy Beneke

Geoff Lees, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Microcontrollers, at Freescale Semiconductor, got things rolling Thursday morning at the Java Community Keynote to a packed, standing-room-only crowd. Lees presented a precise and thoughtful vision of how the coming Internet of Things (IoT) might become a reality.

“The microcontroller community is rapidly moving to adopt Java and we need your help,” said Lees. He described a picture of the IoT that, for him, changes daily with ever-increasing speed. Current network developers often have a conception of edge node devices that consist of X86 processors with large scale OS, or multicore mobile processors with mobile OS. He spoke of an alternative picture in which edge node devices are everywhere in our environment, monitoring local climate conditions, monitoring mechanical factors like stress loading, and traffic data, and making smart roads happen. He sees node devices dealing with our busiest highways, offering road tolling and other measures to even out traffic flow. Or in agriculture, the IoT might monitor climate, humidity, weather conditions, and local microclimates. He spoke of smart homes where existing home networks are coming together to conjoin future personal networks and even body networks. He spoke of the IoT in aiding fitness and health tracking.

Lees elaborated a vision in which local autonomous data intelligence is gathered through local command control, and data sets are passed onto the cloud for higher level analytics. He explained that the IoT is changing the way the semiconductor industry is thinking about technology, in terms of processing node transitions, greater utilization of advanced sensor technologies, integration of those technologies, ever rapid adoption of low power technologies both from processing as well as design techniques. Advances in signal analog integration and the IoT are bringing these things closer.

“Instead of the next few years, we’re thinking about how to do all of this in the next few months,” said Lees.

In addition, a new class of products is arriving where connectivity underpins all product development. “Over the last decade,” commented Lees, “the microcontroller industry has shipped 150 billion devices into the market, the vast majority of which were not interconnected -- they were single, local points of intelligence. Today, the plans for those products are becoming ubiquitously part of another network. Networking technology needs to be built in with the capability to run advanced communication stacks present.” All of this will require more memory, more technology, and higher gate density.

He spoke of software becoming the big differentiator in the microcontroller community. “Today,” he explained, “in the embedded microcontroller community, our customers spend approximately 60% of their R&D on software as compared with hardware development. In the next 3 years that is forecast to become 70%. We need to see the software enablers as underpinning these system solution products. All of this comes together with a wide range of networking protocols, low-power communication protocols, and stacks. And the Holy Grail would be to have IPV 6 readily available from the cloud to networking, all the way to the edge node. Until that becomes enabled by cost, by process technology, by miniaturization and power reduction, we will have a wide range of sub-net protocols.”

He spoke of a move towards universal MEMS devices and technology for sensors, followed by the integration of universal MEMS within microcontrollers and embedded processors. “All of this,” he insisted “will come together as part of the ecosystem with all of these smart services. And these smart services depend on available local service providers and service models that we, the consumer, want to pay for, or that health insurers want to pay for. Providing this service and platform for secured services is a key for the adoption of the IoT.”

He expanded on his vision of a landscape for IoT, which would extend all the way from the cloud, down through processing nodes, local connectivity networks, and on to edge or sensor nodes, where the sensor, the MCU, and local connectivity come together. The challenge today, according to Lees, is that this diversity uses a huge range of technologies, different developmental environments, different software ecosystems, and different partner networks. There exist different security classes and considerations -- even down to the current edge node devices which offer no appreciable security. This clearly is not a landscape that will provide the kind of secured service delivery that the IoT needs.

The key to creating this secure IoT lies with Java developers. Edge nodes offered through Java and Java ME offer the potential to have secure encryption and authentication services throughout the network. Developing those in other environments will be locally difficult, will not be global, and will not reach the tipping point required for the IoT to develop. “Edge nodes is a category encompassing thousands and thousands of applications -- it’s billions of devices, most of which will include some form of MCU or embedded MPU technology,” Lees explained. “Sensors and actuators, integrated connectivity and an energy source, whether that’s energy harvesting or ultra low power battery technology and long life power generation – these nodes will need to be installed in remote places with battery life spans of 10 years or more – clearly out of the range of today’s processor technologies. And many will need to be industrial or automotive grade technologies.”

He spoke of a challenge to bring performance and cost requirements so as to harness and secure larger memory stacks which will require more software in the next 2-3 years.

After offering considerably more technical detail, he spoke of how IoT could benefit humans, focusing on home tele-health and the home health hub, something Freescale has invested in recently. The availability of a wide range of personal biometrics and health analytics in the home health hub could benefit our health enormously, according to Lees. Until now, the technology has been limited by the absence of open standard secured service across the network to complete the link onto the health provider, and medical insurance providers. The new model offers a huge adoption of preventive health as opposed to diagnostic clinical health. Consumers, health insurers and the medical industry all favor it.

“Measuring heart rate, blood pressure, and blood glucose continually every day through changing conditions offers an immense picture of our personal health with diagnostic insights into the development of progressive disease and chronic disease management,” observed Lees. “At the local hub level the installation of analytics will offer feedback and guidance on lifestyle, on the management of conditions and offer the personal feedback needed for us to all manage our own health. The data can also be sent in datasets for further analysis in the network and cloud so the next time you visit your health practitioner, all of that data is available.”

He reported that Freescale and Oracle have announced a new agreement collaborating on engineering to develop a platform for software and hardware models for both edge nodes and a wide variety of gateway solutions. “We’re working on optimizing Java together and bringing Java functionality further into the network. We’re even envisaging what Java might look like on a transmit-only Bluetooth low-energy node in the field for 25 years, a concept today that is unthinkable for a Java model. The key is to provide a secure service delivery for our customers and for service providers across the industry.”

The rest of the keynote consisted of a variety of informative and entertaining presentations.

Donald Smith, Senior Director, Product Management, at Oracle’s Java Platform Group, took the stage and commented on recent developments in recent JavaOnes. JavaOne 2011 was about moving Java forward and rebooting the infrastructure after the Java SE 7 launch. Last year, the theme was innovation and showing Java’s role in major tech segments like the cloud, big data, IoT and open source.

“This year,” he said, “we take one step beyond all that, and celebrate the 'End User' and 'Application Developers'. We want to go beyond the typical ‘ISV’ that appears at JavaOne keynotes and show some inspiring applications being built thanks to the hard work of the Java ecosystem.”

After some rousing appreciation of the Raspberry Pi Challenge, the Codegarten and other JavaOne matters by Tori Wieldt of the Oracle Technology Network, a series of creative contributors to Java took the stage, hosted by Henrik Stahl, Vice President, Product Management, Java Platform Group at Oracle.

-- Java Champion Stephan Janssen, founder of BeJUG, Devoxx(4kids), Parleys & playpass.be talked about “Devoxx for Kids,” a one-day event he organized in response to his 11-year-old son’s desire to learn to program.

-- Oracle Academy Vice President, Alison Derbenwick Miller, described the Academy’s important work impacting 2.5 million students in 102 countries.

-- Aditya Gupta, an impressive 10-year-old Minecraft hacker, entertained the audience with his hacking demo where he showed off some video explosions.

-- Two Duke Segway robots appeared on stage and strutted around under the guidance of Java Champion, Stephen Chin.

-- A video was shown of Java Champion Paul Perrone’s Java-powered cars.

-- Drew Hylbert, VP, Technology and Infrastructure at Opower, came onstage and shared how Java technology is used to enable consumers to save energy.

-- Mike Marzo, a Technology Fellow at Goldman Sachs, discussed the value of the 100 million lines of Java code that Goldman’s developers have written over the years.

--Sean Phillips, Senior Software Engineer at a.i. solutions, presented a video that explained uses of Java in NASA MMS mission operations software.

-- Finally “father of Java” and Chief Software Architect at Liquid Robotics, James Gosling appeared and remarked that Aditya Gupta made him feel that he too should be a Minecraft hacker. He showed the view from the water looking at Hawaii from one of the Liquid Robotics nodes and explained in detail how it all worked.

The Community Keynote offered a strong sense of renewal and pride at what Java has accomplished and where it may be headed.

Freescale Semiconductor

Liquid Robotics

Perrone Robotics

Watch Keynote and Session Highlights on Demand

Session Report: 50 New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 minutes

 by Timothy Beneke

On Tuesday afternoon, noted Java EE authors Arun Gupta and Antonio Goncalves offered a whirlwind tour of new features in “Java EE 7: Fifty New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 Minutes”. Gupta is legendary at Oracle for his hard work and astute grasp of the Java EE platform. His blog offers a wealth of insight into Java EE and other Java matters. He is the author, most recently, of Java EE 7 Essentials published by O’Reilly. Goncalves is one of the most highly regarded writers on EE anywhere and the author of Beginning Java EE 7, published by Apress.

Java EE 7’s new features enhance HTML5 support, increase developer productivity, and further improve how enterprise demands can be met. Developers will write significantly less boilerplate code, have better support for the latest Web applications, and gain access to enhanced scalability and richer, simpler functionality. The session did a stellar job of spelling out the details to a packed house.

With four new components (WebSocket, JSON-P, batch, and concurrency), and three old ones significantly updated (JAX-RS, JMS, and EL), along with other significant changes to the platform, a lot of new functionality has been added.

They divided the new Java EE 7 features into 19 categories and explained an average of two to three features in each category.  Here were the categories:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346)
Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349)
Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318)
Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236)
JPA 2.1 (JSR 338)
JTA 1.2 (JSR 907)
EJB 3.2 (JSR 345)
JMS 2.0 (JSR 343)
Servlet 3.1 (JSR 340)
Web Socket 1.0 (JSR 356)
Expression Language 3.0 (JSR 341)
JSF 2.2 (JSR 344)
JAX-RS 2.0 (JSR 339)
JSON-P 1.0 (JSR 353)
Batch 1.0 (JSR 352)
JavaMail 1.5 (JSR 919)
JCA 1.7 (JSR 322)
Java Connector Architecture
Default Resources

Here are just a few of the high points:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346) enables finer scanning control and the ability to veto the processing of a class or package. Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349) allows for method validation and the ability to pre/post conditions on method and constructors. Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318) focused on the ability to associate an Interceptor associated with a constructor and the ability to prioritize interceptor bindings.

For Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236), the emphasis was on ManagedExecutor with a focus on:
* User threads in Java EE applications
* The ability to support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* And to extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)

Further emphasis in concurrency was on ManagedThreadFactory and DynamicProxy.

Dynamic Proxy:
* Creates dynamic proxy objects, and adds contextual information available for applications running in Java EE environment
* It supports Classloading, JNDI, Security, …

Also covered as part of concurrency: ManagedExecutor
* User threads in Java EE applications
* Support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* Extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)
– java.util.concurrent package

In addition: ManagedScheduledExecutor
* Managed version of ScheduledExecutorService
* Submit delayed or periodic tasks

For JPA 2.1 (JSR 338), standardized database schema generation and the ability to define additional indexes in schema generation were emphasized. JTA 1.2 (JSR 907) was praised for its capacity for transaction management on Managed Beans as a CDI interceptor binding; in addition, it offers CDI scope whose lifecycle is scoped to the currently active JTA transaction.

They discussed WebSocket and annotated server endpoint which enables full-duplex bi-directional communication over a single TCP connection.

JSON Builder creates an object model (or an array) in memory by adding elements. JsonParser is an event-based parser that can read JSON data from a stream.

All in all, it was an impressive display of Java SE 7 expertise.

Java EE 7 Essentials by Arun Gupta

Beginning Java EE 7 by Antonio Goncalves

Be sure to check out Parleys.com in early October to listen to the entire session. It's well worth it.

Wednesday Jul 17, 2013

And The Winners Are.... the most popular articles on otn

Here is a list of the most popular articles, in terms of traffic, on otn/java in the last 12 months. It's, as usual, a rich mix of Java and Java-related technologies, types of articles and variety of authors.

Check out any that you might have missed and vote with your visit.


1.  “Getting Started with Java® SE Embedded on the Raspberry Pi" by Bill Courington and Gary Collins August 2012

2. “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder”  by Mark Heckler  November 2012

3. “Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7”  by Janice J. Heiss  February 2013

4. “Java Experts on the State of Java” by Janice J. Heiss   January 2013

5. “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” by Adam Bien  April 2013

6. “Coding on Crete: An Interview with Java Specialist Heinz Kabutz” by Janice J. Heiss     January 2013  http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/java/heinzkabutz-1899134.html

7. “Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense”  by Björn Müller  March 2013

8. “The Advent of Kotlin: A Conversation with JetBrains' Andrey Breslav”  by Janice J. Heiss  April 2013

9. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX”  by Adam Bien   June 2012

10. “JSR 356, Java API for WebSocket”  by Johan Vos  April 2013

And here are five runners up.

11. “Introducing Groovy”  by Jim Driscoll  July 2012

12. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX: Part Two”  by Adam Bien  June 2012

13. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML” by James L. Weaver  June 2012

14. “JavaOne 2012 Review: Make the Future Java” by Steve Meloan  October 2012

15. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two”  By James L. Weaver  September 2012

Friday Feb 22, 2013

Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7

Oracle’s Java evangelist and noted Java EE expert, Arun Gupta, presented a session at the annual IOUC (International Oracle User Community) Summit, held January 14–16, 2013, at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California, where more than 100 top user group leaders from around the world gathered to share best practices, provide feedback, and receive updates from leading Oracle developers.

Gupta’s talk, titled "The Java EE 7 Platform: Higher Productivity and Embracing HTML5," presented a glimpse into the rich possibilities that will be available in Java EE 7 upon its release in the spring of 2013. He covered several major developments, including:

* Java API for RESTful Web Services 2.0
* Java Message Service 2.0
* Java API for JSON Processing 1.0
* Java API for WebSocket 1.0
* Bean Validation 1.1
* Batch Applications for the Java Platform 1.0
* Java Persistence API 2.1
* Servlet 3.1
* Concurrency Utilities for Java EE 1.0
* JavaServer Faces 2.2

Gupta focuses on ways in which Java EE 7 offers higher productivity; less boilerplate; richer functionality; more default options; and HTML5 support in the form of WebSocket and JSON. He also observed that the cloud is in need of more standards. From the article:

"There are not enough standards in the cloud with W3C and other standards bodies. More standards are needed so that we can define a Java API for the cloud. Premature standardization can also be a problem if not enough innovation has taken place. So what is the right thing for the platform? We have reached out to the community, the core group members, and the executive committee of the Java Community Process and have focused on providing higher productivity and on embracing the HTML5 platform more closely. We are going to use dependency injection a lot more, which will give developers the ability to write less boilerplate code and offer richer functionality such as batch applications and caching. Similarly, for HTML5, we are embracing WebSocket functionality and the ability to parse and generate a JSON structure. We are providing support for HTML5-friendly markup as part of JSF.”

Gupta summarized the strengths of the various JSRs and closed by encouraging developers to participate in Adopt-a-JSR, a project that enables them to, “pursue their interest in particular Java EE 7 JSRs and download code, play with it, report bugs, and offer feedback to Java EE 7 specification leads.”

Check out the article here.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

Evolutionary Next-Steps - Technical Keynote JavaOne 2011

Monday morning's Technical Keynote began with Doug Fisher, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Software and Services Group’s System Software Division, Intel. Fisher and a number of Intel colleagues reviewed Intel’s long association with Java, and their collaborative work with Oracle to optimize the Java platform (for both the JVM and Fusion Middleware) on Intel hardware.


From there, Ashok Joshi, Senior Director of Development NoSQL Database, briefly discussed performance tuning with Intel of the newly announced Oracle NoSQL Database product.

From Evolution to Revolution: Java 7 to Java 8

Following Joshi, Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle, reviewed the history of Java 7, and its “Plan B” paradigm of including Project Coin (JSR 334), InvokeDynamic (JSR 292), and the Fork/Join Framework in the just-released Java 7, while incorporating Project Jigsaw and Project Lambda in the upcoming Java 8. Reinhold then explored the evolutionary benefits of these key new features of the Java 7 release -- offering both greater ease of development, and significant performance benefits. “Not only are these features available in Java 7 today,” noted Reinhold, “but as of last week, they are now supported in all three of the major Java IDEs.”

Reinhold next detailed plans for the upcoming Java 8 release, which promises more revolutionary features beyond the evolutionary offerings of Java 7. Project Lambda (JSR 335) will bring closures to the Java programming language. And Project Jigsaw (JSR TBD) aims to define a standard module system -- not just for application code, but for the platform itself.

JavaFX 2.0 is Here!

Richard Bair, Chief Architect, Client Java Platform, Oracle, then dove into the official debut of JavaFX 2.0, along with some stunning demos of the new facility, presented by several colleagues. Java FX 2.0 is Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications. Bair emphasized that JavaFX 2.0 was designed to offer:

Cross Platform
Leverage Java
Advanced Tooling
Developer Productivity
Amazing User Interfaces.

“We naturally want user interfaces that look good and work well,” said Bair. “It used to be just eye candy, but now it’s becoming a required feature for the things we write. We’re announcing today the general availability of JavaFX 2.0, at JavaFX.com. We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.”

An important aspect of any UI technology is a good visual development tool, and Bair next announced early access for the JavaFX Scene Builder, which will first be made available to select partners, then expanded to a general beta, and then a full release. But for those at JavaOne, an early build of the tool will be running and available for demo at the DEMOgrounds.

A series of stunning demos -- several of them BSD licensed caused much enthusiasm -- then took JavaFX 2.0 out for a spin, and clearly showed the possibilities and potentials of the new release -- including animated 3D audio EQ mapping, and a navigable 3D virtual room that featured live video of Oracle colleague Jasper Potts displayed on a wall monitor, along with real-time mimicking of Potts’ movements by a virtual Java Duke figure.

Bair noted that there are over 50 JavaFX sessions at JavaOne, and said that for anyone who attended all of them -- “I’ll buy you dinner!”

Moving Java EE into the Cloud

From there, Linda DeMichiel, Java EE 7 Specification Lead, explored the upcoming Java EE 7 release. “What’s new with the Java EE platform?” asked DeMichiel. “We’re moving Java EE into the Cloud. Our focus on this release is providing support for Platform as a Service. We want to provide a way for customers and users of the platform to leverage public, private and hybrid clouds. With Java EE 7, our focus is on the platform itself as a service, which can be leveraged in cloud environments.”

DeMichiel’s colleague, Arun Gupta, then demonstrated deployment of a Java EE application as a PaaS, using Glassfish 4.0. Both the application and instructions on how to replicate the demo are available online.

More Java Cards than People?

Lastly, Hinkmond Wong, of Oracle’s Java Embedded group, covered the latest in mobile and embedded Java, noting the three billion Java enabled phones and five billion Java Cards in the world today. “There are about 6.5 billion people in the world,” noted Wong, “and five billion Java Cards.”

2011 saw the introduction of Near Field Communication (NFC) payment system, including e-Passport in Java ME, allowing for mobile-to-mobile and machine-to-machine transactions with embedded security. Wong detailed the many new Java ME releases for 2011, along with several mobile and embedded technology demos—from cell phones to Blu-ray players.

The overflow crowd left the opening technical keynote energized – a real good start to this JavaOne!

Learn More:

Java 7 Features

Java SE 7 Features and Enhancements

A Look at Java 7's New Features

Contribute to JDK 8

JavaFX Homepage

JavaFX Overview

Java EE at a Glance

Java for Mobile Devices

Oracle NoSQL Database

Oracle Technology Network for Java Developers

Monday Oct 03, 2011

Evolutionary Next-Steps - Technical Keynote JavaOne 2011

Monday morning's Technical Keynote began with Doug Fisher, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Software and Services Group’s System Software Division, Intel. Fisher and a number of Intel colleagues reviewed Intel’s long association with Java, and their collaborative work with Oracle to optimize the Java platform (for both the JVM and Fusion Middleware) on Intel hardware.

From there, Ashok Joshi, Senior Director of Development NoSQL Database, briefly discussed performance tuning with Intel of the newly announced Oracle NoSQL Database product.

From Evolution to Revolution: Java 7 to Java 8

Following Joshi, Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle, reviewed the history of Java 7, and its “Plan B” paradigm of including Project Coin (JSR 334), InvokeDynamic (JSR 292), and the Fork/Join Framework in the just-released Java 7, while incorporating Project Jigsaw and Project Lambda in the upcoming Java 8. Reinhold then explored the evolutionary benefits of these key new features of the Java 7 release -- offering both greater ease of development, and significant performance benefits. “Not only are these features available in Java 7 today,” noted Reinhold, “but as of last week, they are now supported in all three of the major Java IDEs.”

Reinhold next detailed plans for the upcoming Java 8 release, which promises more revolutionary features beyond the evolutionary offerings of Java 7. Project Lambda (JSR 335) will bring closures to the Java programming language. And Project Jigsaw (JSR TBD) aims to define a standard module system -- not just for application code, but for the platform itself.

JavaFX 2.0 is Here!

Richard Bair, Chief Architect, Client Java Platform, Oracle, then dove into the official debut of JavaFX 2.0, along with some stunning demos of the new facility, presented by several colleagues. Java FX 2.0 is Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications. Bair emphasized that JavaFX 2.0 was designed to offer:

Cross Platform
Leverage Java
Advanced Tooling
Developer Productivity
Amazing User Interfaces.

“We naturally want user interfaces that look good and work well,” said Bair. “It used to be just eye candy, but now it’s becoming a required feature for the things we write. We’re announcing today the general availability of JavaFX 2.0, at JavaFX.com. We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.”

An important aspect of any UI technology is a good visual development tool, and Bair next announced early access for the JavaFX Scene Builder, which will first be made available to select partners, then expanded to a general beta, and then a full release. But for those at JavaOne, an early build of the tool will be running and available for demo at the DEMOgrounds.

A series of stunning demos -- several of them BSD licensed caused much enthusiasm -- then took JavaFX 2.0 out for a spin, and clearly showed the possibilities and potentials of the new release -- including animated 3D audio EQ mapping, and a navigable 3D virtual room that featured live video of Oracle colleague Jasper Potts displayed on a wall monitor, along with real-time mimicking of Potts’ movements by a virtual Java Duke figure.

Bair noted that there are over 50 JavaFX sessions at JavaOne, and said that for anyone who attended all of them -- “I’ll buy you dinner!”

Moving Java EE into the Cloud

From there, Linda DeMichiel, Java EE 7 Specification Lead, explored the upcoming Java EE 7 release. “What’s new with the Java EE platform?” asked DeMichiel. “We’re moving Java EE into the Cloud. Our focus on this release is providing support for Platform as a Service. We want to provide a way for customers and users of the platform to leverage public, private and hybrid clouds. With Java EE 7, our focus is on the platform itself as a service, which can be leveraged in cloud environments.”

DeMichiel’s colleague, Arun Gupta, then demonstrated deployment of a Java EE application as a PaaS, using Glassfish 4.0. Both the application and instructions on how to replicate the demo are available online.

More Java Cards than People?

Lastly, Hinkmond Wong, of Oracle’s Java Embedded group, covered the latest in mobile and embedded Java, noting the three billion Java enabled phones and five billion Java Cards in the world today. “There are about 6.5 billion people in the world,” noted Wong, “and five billion Java Cards.”

2011 saw the introduction of Near Field Communication (NFC) payment system, including e-Passport in Java ME, allowing for mobile-to-mobile and machine-to-machine transactions with embedded security. Wong detailed the many new Java ME releases for 2011, along with several mobile and embedded technology demos—from cell phones to Blu-ray players.

The overflow crowd left the opening technical keynote energized – a real good start to this JavaOne!

Learn More:

Java 7 Features:
http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk7/features/

Java SE 7 Features and Enhancements:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/jdk7-relnotes-418459.html

A Look at Java 7's New Features:
http://radar.oreilly.com/2011/09/java7-features.html

Contribute to JDK 8:
http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk8/
http://jdk8.java.net/

JavaFX:
http://javafx.com/
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javafx/overview/index.html

Java EE at a Glance:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/overview/index.html

Java for Mobile Devices:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javame/javamobile/overview/getstarted/index.html

Oracle NoSQL Database:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/nosqldb/overview/index.html
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