Monday Mar 23, 2015

Two Live Streaming Java Sessions from vJUG

The vJUG, a virtual Java user group, presents live streaming technical sessions about topics related to Java, JVM, Java EE, Internet of Things and more. Organized by Mani Sarkar and Simon Maple from the London Java Community, their aim is to get the greatest minds and speakers of the Java industry to give talks and presentations in the form of webinars and live streaming from JUG meetups.

First session: How is Java/JVM built?  Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 14:45 UTC, 15:45 in Germany, 10:45am in New York, 7:45am in San Francisco, and 22:45 in Beijing

Mani Sarkar and Daniel Bryant will give an overview of the Adopt OpenJDK program. They’ll explain why developers should get involved, how to participate, and how front-end developers can take advantage of the Adopt OpenJDK. Watch the session live at http://nighthacking.com/event/javaland-2015/

Second session: What's coming in Java.Next? Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 14:45 UTC, 15:45 in Germany, 10:45am in New York, 7:45am in San Francisco, and 22:45 in Beijing

Learn from Heather VanCura how you can take part in Java technology by Adopting a JSR. This session give a brief overview of the Adopt-a-JSR program. Andres Almiray will discuss JSR 377, Desktop|Embedded Application API; Anatole Tresch will discuss JSR 354, Money & Currency API; and Ed Burns will discuss the two JSRs he is currently leading, JSR 369, Java Servlet 4.0 Specification and JSR 372, JavaServer Faces (JSF 2.3) Specification.

Two sessions are scheduled for next week. They are live from the JavaLand Conference in Germany, in partnership with the Nighthacking community.  You can watch them online at http://nighthacking.com/event/javaland-2015/  

Monday May 19, 2014

JavaFX SceneBuilder 2.0

JavaFX SceneBuilder 2.0 has been released. JavaFX provides a set of graphics and media packages that enables developers to design, create, test, debug, and deploy rich client applications that operate consistently across diverse platforms. New features include Support for new JavaFX 8 UI components, 3D Support, and the ability to add custom GUI components to the Library. You can get a complete list of new features Announcing SceneBuilder 2.0 by Japser Potts.

Learn more about JavaFX.  

JavaFX is now included with the standard JDK and JRE bundles.  Download JDK8

Download Scene Builder 2.0.

Read the Scene Builder User Guide

For news and demos, check out the JavaFX Experience.

Ask questions on the JavaFX Forum.

This video demonstration of JavaFX Scene Builder 2.0 shows how you can make an aeronautical themed demo app, showing how to build layout, apply CSS and connect code.  


Wednesday Sep 26, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Simon Ritter

Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter is well known at JavaOne for his quirky and fun-loving sessions, which, this year include:

  • CON4644 -- “JavaFX Extreme GUI Makeover” (with Angela Caicedo on how to improve UIs in JavaFX)
  • CON5352 -- “Building JavaFX Interfaces for the Real World” (Kinect gesture tracking and mind reading)
  • CON5348 -- “Do You Like Coffee with Your Dessert?” (Some cool demos of Java of the Raspberry Pi)
  • CON6375 -- “Custom JavaFX Charts: (How to extend JavaFX Chart controls with some interesting things)

I recently asked Ritter about the significance of the Raspberry Pi, the topic of one of his sessions that consists of a credit card-sized single-board computer developed in the UK with the intention of stimulating the teaching of basic computer science in schools.

“I don't think there's one definitive thing that makes the RP significant,” observed Ritter, “but a combination of things that really makes it stand out. First, it's the cost: $35 for what is effectively a completely usable computer. OK, so you have to add a power supply, SD card for storage and maybe a screen, keyboard and mouse, but this is still way cheaper than a typical PC. The choice of an ARM processor is also significant, as it avoids problems like cooling (no heat sink or fan) and can use a USB power brick.  Combine these two things with the immense groundswell of community support and it provides a fantastic platform for teaching young and old alike about computing, which is the real goal of the project.”

He informed me that he’ll be at the Raspberry Pi meetup on Saturday (not part of JavaOne). Check out the details here.

JavaFX Interfaces
When I asked about how JavaFX can interface with the real world, he said that there are many ways.

“JavaFX provides you with a simple set of programming interfaces that can create complex, cool and compelling user interfaces,” explained Ritter. “Because it's just Java code you can combine JavaFX with any other Java library to provide data to display and control the interface. What I've done for my session is look at some of the possible ways of doing this using some of the amazing hardware that's available today at very low cost. The Kinect sensor has added a new dimension to gaming in terms of interaction; there's a Java API to access this so you can easily collect skeleton tracking data from it. Some clever people have also written libraries that can track gestures like swipes, circles, pushes, and so on. We use these to control parts of the UI. I've also experimented with a Neurosky EEG sensor that can in some ways ‘read your mind’ (well, at least measure some of the brain functions like attention and meditation).  I've written a Java library for this that I include as a way of controlling the UI. We're not quite at the stage of just thinking a command though!”

Here Comes Java Embedded
And what, from Ritter’s perspective, is the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “I think it's seeing just how Java continues to become more and more pervasive,” he said. “One of the areas that is growing rapidly is embedded systems.  We've talked about the ‘Internet of things’ for many years; now it's finally becoming a reality. With the ability of more and more devices to include processing, storage and networking we need an easy way to write code for them that's reliable, has high performance, and is secure. Java fits all these requirements. With Java Embedded being a conference within a conference, I'm very excited about the possibilities of Java in this space.”

Check out Ritter’s sessions or say hi if you run into him.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

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