Monday Dec 16, 2013

Technical Article: RESTful GlassFish Monitoring and Management

In this new OTN technical article, RESTful GlassFish Monitoring and Management, Java EE expert Adam Bien shows you how to exploit the built-in monitoring and management capabilities of GlassFish to automate application deployment and gain insight into application performance.

"IT is all about streamlining and automation, so it is somewhat ironic that we developers still tolerate repetitive and boring manual tasks, such as deployment," Bien explains. "Also, our ignorance about easily accessible information for application servers, such as monitoring data, is surprising" he notes.

Application servers have emitted useful monitoring data and provided basic management capabilities for years, but both capabilities have been ignored. The DevOps movement is making these built-in monitoring and management capabilities interesting again. 

The article describes the GlassFish management API, which allows you to manipulate the GlassFish application server's configuration, including its monitoring capabilities. It also describes the GlassFish monitoring API, which provides a read-only facility for accessing the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), the GlassFish application server, and the GlassFish application server's metrics and counters.

Read the full article RESTful GlassFish Monitoring and Management on OTN.

Monday Nov 04, 2013

GlassFish and JavaEE Roadmap Update

As announced at JavaOne, GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 is scheduled for 2014. 
Oracle is planning updates as needed to GlassFish Server Open Source Edition, which is commercially unsupported
. Oracle has announced the following updates to the GlassFish roadmap:

  • The trunk will eventually transition to GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5 as a Java EE 8 implementation. 
The Java EE 8 Reference Implementation will be derived from GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5. This replicates what has been done in past Java EE and GlassFish Server releases.
  • Oracle will no longer release future major releases of Oracle GlassFish Server with commercial support – specifically Oracle GlassFish Server 4.x with commercial Java EE 7 support will not be released.
Commercial Java EE 7 support will be provided from WebLogic Server.
  • Oracle GlassFish Server will not be releasing a 4.x commercial version.

 

Oracle is committed to the future of Java EE. Java EE 7 has been released and planning for Java EE 8 has begun. GlassFish Server Open Source Edition continues to be the strategic foundation for Java EE reference implementation going forward. The primary role of GlassFish Server Open Source Edition has been, and continues to be, driving adoption of the latest release of the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition. 

For more information, read Java EE and GlassFish Server Roadmap Update blog on the The Aquarium. 

Tuesday Sep 24, 2013

Session Report: JSR 341: Expression Language 3.0

Ed Burns, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, and Kinman Chung, Principle Member of Technical Staff, both at Oracle, presented a session on Monday in which they described new features in JSR 341, Expression Language (EL) 3.0. They discussed the APIs for the use of EL in standalone environments and EL syntax for new operators, plus lambda expressions, and support for collection objects, all the while offering copious code illustrations.

Burns remarked that he was pleased that Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star Adam Bien had referred to EL 3.0 as “the hidden gem of Java EE”. “I don’t know how hidden it is,” said Burns, “but I think it’s a gem.”

He discussed the origins of EL, which has a long and active history in the Java platform. EL began in 2004 as part of the Java Standard Tag Library (JSTL 1.0), moved to JSP 2.0 in 2006, and became an independent specification with JSR 341 in 2011. It is used in JSF, CDI, and Avatar. Now, 9 years after its inception, it is an independent specification that is heavily used in JSF.   

Burns observed that the presence of EL is the key differentiator between Java server and non-java server stacks. “Java server-based web frameworks are likely to use EL,” said Burns. “When you show someone who is not familiar with EL how easy it is to move things together from disparate parts of your application, it’s very compelling.”

The most important feature that EL 3 brings is lambda expressions – developers do not have to wait until Java SE 8 is released. It all runs on Java EE 7, which requires Java SE 7 -- which means that it is currently available. Burns gave a brief discussion of lambda expressions, which basically behave like an anonymous function -- lambdas in EL are EL expressions. They offer full access to the EL environment within the body of the EL lambda expression, something not available from Java SE lambdas. “You won’t be able to refer to other EL things from a plain old SE lambda expression,” said Burns.

The goal of EL 3 is to provide greater expressive power for applications and to use it outside of Java EE. Burns and Chung provided an overview of collection operations and explained EL’s support for stand-alone environments. EL 3 is easy to use outside of Java EE and provides standard data structures: ELContext; ELResolvers; and local variable and function repositories.

They explained that it enables direct EL operations and has: EL expression evaluation; Bean definition; and Function definition. They emphasized that other key parts of Java EE can also be used standalone, such as: Bean Validation; Persistence (JPA); and Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI). They encouraged developers to consider the possibilities for cloud deployment in: Defining functions and variables and defining beans.

They spent the rest of the session illustrating their key points with a healthy dose of code.

Links and Downloads:
* JSR 341: http://www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=341
    Download spec and API javadocs

* Project home: https://java.net/projects/el-spec/
   Report spec bugs or RFE for el.next

* RI: https://java.net/projects/uel/
   Maven artifacts available from Maven Central
   Download source and report RI bugs

* Integrated in Glassfish 4.0: https://glassfish.java.net/

You can listen to this session in early October on Parleys.com.

Friday Sep 13, 2013

Josh Juneau – Learning More at JavaOne

Jython expert Josh Juneau on Java development today.[Read More]

Thursday Jun 27, 2013

An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7

Up on otn/java is a new article by Oracle senior software engineer Mahesh Kannan, titled “An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7.0,” which explains the new batch processing capabilities provided by JSR 352 in Java EE 7. Kannan explains that “Batch processing is used in many industries for tasks ranging from payroll processing; statement generation; end-of-day jobs such as interest calculation and ETL (extract, load, and transform) in a data warehouse; and many more. Typically, batch processing is bulk-oriented, non-interactive, and long running—and might be data- or computation-intensive. Batch jobs can be run on schedule or initiated on demand. Also, since batch jobs are typically long-running jobs, check-pointing and restarting are common features found in batch jobs.”

JSR 352 defines the programming model for batch applications plus a runtime to run and manage batch jobs. The article covers feature highlights, selected APIs, the structure of Job Scheduling Language, and explains some of the key functions of JSR 352 using a simple payroll processing application. The article also describes how developers can run batch applications using GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.0.

Kannan summarizes the article as follows:

“In this article, we saw how to write, package, and run simple batch applications that use chunk-style steps. We also saw how the checkpoint feature of the batch runtime allows for the easy restart of failed batch jobs. Yet, we have barely scratched the surface of JSR 352. With the full set of Java EE components and features at your disposal, including servlets, EJB beans, CDI beans, EJB automatic timers, and so on, feature-rich batch applications can be written fairly easily.”

Check out the article here.

Tuesday Jul 03, 2012

The Enterprise Side of JavaFX: Part Two

A new article, part of a three-part series, now up on the front page of otn/java, by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX,” shows developers how to implement the LightView UI dashboard with JavaFX 2. Bien explains that “the RESTful back end of the LightView application comes with a rudimentary HTML page that is used to start/stop the monitoring service, set the snapshot interval, and activate/deactivate the GlassFish monitoring capabilities.”

He explains that “the configuration view implemented in the org.lightview.view.Browser component is needed only to start or stop the monitoring process or set the monitoring interval.”

Bien concludes his article with a general summary of the principles applied:

“JavaFX encourages encapsulation without forcing you to build models for each visual component. With the availability of bindable properties, the boundary between the view and the model can be reduced to an expressive set of bindable properties. Wrapping JavaFX components with ordinary Java classes further reduces the complexity. Instead of dealing with low-level JavaFX mechanics all the time, you can build simple components and break down the complexity of the presentation logic into understandable pieces. CSS skinning further helps with the separation of the code that is needed for the implementation of the presentation logic and the visual appearance of the application on the screen. You can adjust significant portions of an application's look and feel directly in CSS files without touching the actual source code.”

Check out the article here.

Wednesday Jun 13, 2012

The Enterprise Side of JavaFX - Part One

A new article, now up on otn/java, by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX,” shows developers how to use LightView to convert REST services into a bindable set of properties. The article, Part One of a three-part series, presents the enterprise and business side of JavaFX with minimal animations, effects, and transitions, and a focus on structuring the presentation logic and integration with back-end services.

Bien makes use of LightFish, LightView and much more:

“LightFish is an open source monitoring application that periodically fetches and persists snapshots from a “GlassFish Under Test” machine and makes them available in real time via a simplified REST API.

LightFish comes with a basic Web interface to manage the data-capturing interval that is implemented with JavaServer Faces 2. LightView is a JavaFX 2 real-time visualizer that integrates the Web UI directly and accesses the monitoring data via REST and long polling. It could be considered to be a ‘stress test dashboard.’”

Look for Part Two of the series, which will directly integrate the JavaServer Faces 2 UI with WebView.

Check out the article here.

Tuesday Apr 24, 2012

Spring to Java EE Migration – Part 4, the Finale

In a new article, now up on otn/java, titled “Spring to Java EE Migration, Part 4,” David Heffelfinger presents the final part of his series in which he demonstrates the ease of migration from the Spring Framework to Java EE. Here he compares equivalent functionality in Java EE and Spring in areas such as MVC design pattern implementation, data access, transaction management, and dependency injection.

He concludes the series with these remarks:

“In this series of articles, we developed a Java EE version of Spring’s Pet Clinic application. We saw how the advanced tooling provided by NetBeans enables us to quickly develop a Java EE application…. Once we were done building the Java EE version of the application, we compared it with the Spring version, noting that the original version has several dependencies whereas the Java EE version has none, because it takes advantage of all the services provided by the Java EE application server.

Finally, we compared how to implement similar functionality such as MVC and DAO implementation, transaction management, and dependency injection with Spring and Java EE. In every case with Spring, some XML configuration needs to be done besides adding annotations to the code. Java EE relies on convention, and in most cases, no XML configuration is needed in order to implement these services.

Although newer versions of Spring rely a lot less on explicit XML configuration than earlier versions, there are always a few little lines here and there that we need to add to an XML configuration file in order to get most of the Spring annotations to work, violating the DRY (don’t repeat yourself) principle...

Additionally, Spring applications tend to have several dependencies, because they are meant to run in a “lightweight” Servlet container such as Tomcat or Jetty and these containers don’t provide all the required functionality. In contrast, Java EE applications are meant to be deployed in a full-blown Java EE 6 application server such as Oracle GlassFish Server...

For these reasons, I always recommend Java EE over Spring for enterprise application development.”

Have a look at the article here.

Thursday Mar 01, 2012

NetBeans IDE 7.1.1 Released, with Support for GlassFish 3.1.2

The NetBeans team had a leap day release with NetBeans IDE 7.1.1. An update to NetBeans IDE 7.1, the new release comes with support for GlassFish 3.1.2--another leap day delivery--and the Java ME SDK.

Additional changes in NetBeans IDE 7.1.1 include the integration of recent patches and minor performance improvements. The release is multilingual, with downloads available in English, Brazilian Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, and Simplified Chinese.

 There are two ways to get the new changes:

  • To get the integration of recent patches without GlassFish 3.1.2 or the Java ME SDK: Launch your current installation of NetBeans IDE 7.1, and an update alert will appear. Click the notification box to install the updates. OR to perform the update manually, select Tools-->Plugins-->Reload Catalog (Updates Tab).

 What's on your mind? Join the NetBeans team on Twitter, Facebook and Google+ and let's discuss!

Original news item


Wednesday Feb 29, 2012

GlassFish 3.1.2 Released

Oracle GlassFish Server 3.1.2 has just been released and is ready to download. Oracle GlassFish Server 3.1.2 improves upon its ease-of use features, flexibility and improved developer productivity with several enhancements. Do you want an application server that's both state-of-the-art and production-ready? Johan Vos, CTO at LodgON, says GlassFish is his favorite application server because  "GlassFish contains the most advanced, state-of-the art technology that is seen in similar products a few years later and the quality of GlassFish is very high, the software is ready to be used in production." Here are the highlights of the Oracle GlassFish Server 3.1.2 release:

  • Improved console startup time over previous versions of Oracle GlassFish Server.
  • Enhanced configuration of Java Message Service (JMS) clusters for fault tolerance and failover capabilities.
  • Easier Load Balancer configuration for faster throughput and reduced latenc.
  • Enhanced security with SSL Encrypted traffic between the Domain Administration Server and remote instances.

  • Support for the WebSocket Protocol RFC 6445, enabling bi-directional communication between a client and server, adding a web-origin based security model for browsers
.
  • New DCOM support.  Windows users now have the flexibility to administer Glassfish clusters and instances remotely using SSH or DCOM.

  • New Support for non-Multicast clustering.  GlassFish High-Availability clustering is now possible in environments where multicast is disabled.

  • Improved EclipseLink integration to enable data binding with JAX-WS.  EclipseLink integration provides TopLink Grid support for using Coherence as a 2nd level data cache.

Learn the differences between Oracle GlassFish Server and GlassFish Server Open Source Edition at glassfish.java.net. You can download GlassFish 3.1.2 from the Oracle Technology Network.

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