Friday Sep 26, 2014

Join Community Events at JavaOne 2014

Once a year, the global Java community gathers on the Sunday before JavaOne at three community events. Glassfish and Java EE users join the Executive Panel and GlassFish Adoption Story and Deep Dive. NetBeans enthusiasts get together at the NetBeans Community Day, a whole day of panels. User group leaders and members attend the user group forum. Join them this year on Sunday, September 28 at Moscone South [Read More]

Tuesday Sep 23, 2014

Join Community Events at JavaOne 2014

Once a year, the global Java community gathers on the Sunday before JavaOne at three community events. Glassfish and Java EE users join the Executive Panel and GlassFish Adoption Story and Deep Dive. NetBeans enthusiasts get together at the NetBeans Community Day, a whole day of panels. User group leaders and members attend the user group forum. Join them this year on Sunday, September 28 at Moscone South 

[Read More]

Monday Sep 15, 2014

Get the Latest on GlassFish at JavaOne

Find out the latest on GlassFish and Java EE in two sessions at Sunday’s Oracle Users Forum at JavaOne.

First, the “GlassFish Roadmap and Executive Panel” [UGF9120]  will cover the current status and future roadmap for GlassFish and Java EE. Oracle’s John Clingan, Anil Gaur, and Cameron Purdy will be on hand to answer your questions at this informal session. Come with questions, leave with answers.

That session will be immediately followed by “GlassFish Adoption Story and Deep Dive” [UGF9123] , where you will hear about who is adopting GlassFish and Java EE in real life. Egyptian Java User Group (EGJUG)] Leader Mohamed Taman will share the story of the first-known production deployment of GlassFish 4 and Java EE 7 in a deployment for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the World Food Programme (WFP). This session will also explore the newest cool features in GlassFish, including the extensible GlassFish command-line framework. 

Friday Sep 12, 2014

JavaOne Server-Side Java Track Preview

Java EE 7 has been out for a little over a year, and Java EE 8 planning has begun. With JavaOne fast approaching, I talked with Oracle Java Evangelist David Delabassee to find out what’s going on with Java EE and what’s happening at the JavaOne Server-Side Java track.

What can attendees look forward to at the Server-Side Java track?

There are two big topics: Java EE 7 in real-life deployments and Java EE 8 platform plans.  


[Read More]

Tuesday Sep 09, 2014

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 Released!

Monday Dec 16, 2013

Technical Article: RESTful GlassFish Monitoring and Management

In this new OTN technical article, RESTful GlassFish Monitoring and Management, Java EE expert Adam Bien shows you how to exploit the built-in monitoring and management capabilities of GlassFish to automate application deployment and gain insight into application performance.

"IT is all about streamlining and automation, so it is somewhat ironic that we developers still tolerate repetitive and boring manual tasks, such as deployment," Bien explains. "Also, our ignorance about easily accessible information for application servers, such as monitoring data, is surprising" he notes.

Application servers have emitted useful monitoring data and provided basic management capabilities for years, but both capabilities have been ignored. The DevOps movement is making these built-in monitoring and management capabilities interesting again. 

The article describes the GlassFish management API, which allows you to manipulate the GlassFish application server's configuration, including its monitoring capabilities. It also describes the GlassFish monitoring API, which provides a read-only facility for accessing the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), the GlassFish application server, and the GlassFish application server's metrics and counters.

Read the full article RESTful GlassFish Monitoring and Management on OTN.

Monday Nov 04, 2013

GlassFish and JavaEE Roadmap Update

As announced at JavaOne, GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 is scheduled for 2014. 
Oracle is planning updates as needed to GlassFish Server Open Source Edition, which is commercially unsupported
. Oracle has announced the following updates to the GlassFish roadmap:

  • The trunk will eventually transition to GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5 as a Java EE 8 implementation. 
The Java EE 8 Reference Implementation will be derived from GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5. This replicates what has been done in past Java EE and GlassFish Server releases.
  • Oracle will no longer release future major releases of Oracle GlassFish Server with commercial support – specifically Oracle GlassFish Server 4.x with commercial Java EE 7 support will not be released.
Commercial Java EE 7 support will be provided from WebLogic Server.
  • Oracle GlassFish Server will not be releasing a 4.x commercial version.

 

Oracle is committed to the future of Java EE. Java EE 7 has been released and planning for Java EE 8 has begun. GlassFish Server Open Source Edition continues to be the strategic foundation for Java EE reference implementation going forward. The primary role of GlassFish Server Open Source Edition has been, and continues to be, driving adoption of the latest release of the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition. 

For more information, read Java EE and GlassFish Server Roadmap Update blog on the The Aquarium. 

Tuesday Sep 24, 2013

Session Report: JSR 341: Expression Language 3.0

Ed Burns, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, and Kinman Chung, Principle Member of Technical Staff, both at Oracle, presented a session on Monday in which they described new features in JSR 341, Expression Language (EL) 3.0. They discussed the APIs for the use of EL in standalone environments and EL syntax for new operators, plus lambda expressions, and support for collection objects, all the while offering copious code illustrations.

Burns remarked that he was pleased that Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star Adam Bien had referred to EL 3.0 as “the hidden gem of Java EE”. “I don’t know how hidden it is,” said Burns, “but I think it’s a gem.”

He discussed the origins of EL, which has a long and active history in the Java platform. EL began in 2004 as part of the Java Standard Tag Library (JSTL 1.0), moved to JSP 2.0 in 2006, and became an independent specification with JSR 341 in 2011. It is used in JSF, CDI, and Avatar. Now, 9 years after its inception, it is an independent specification that is heavily used in JSF.   

Burns observed that the presence of EL is the key differentiator between Java server and non-java server stacks. “Java server-based web frameworks are likely to use EL,” said Burns. “When you show someone who is not familiar with EL how easy it is to move things together from disparate parts of your application, it’s very compelling.”

The most important feature that EL 3 brings is lambda expressions – developers do not have to wait until Java SE 8 is released. It all runs on Java EE 7, which requires Java SE 7 -- which means that it is currently available. Burns gave a brief discussion of lambda expressions, which basically behave like an anonymous function -- lambdas in EL are EL expressions. They offer full access to the EL environment within the body of the EL lambda expression, something not available from Java SE lambdas. “You won’t be able to refer to other EL things from a plain old SE lambda expression,” said Burns.

The goal of EL 3 is to provide greater expressive power for applications and to use it outside of Java EE. Burns and Chung provided an overview of collection operations and explained EL’s support for stand-alone environments. EL 3 is easy to use outside of Java EE and provides standard data structures: ELContext; ELResolvers; and local variable and function repositories.

They explained that it enables direct EL operations and has: EL expression evaluation; Bean definition; and Function definition. They emphasized that other key parts of Java EE can also be used standalone, such as: Bean Validation; Persistence (JPA); and Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI). They encouraged developers to consider the possibilities for cloud deployment in: Defining functions and variables and defining beans.

They spent the rest of the session illustrating their key points with a healthy dose of code.

Links and Downloads:
* JSR 341: http://www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=341
    Download spec and API javadocs

* Project home: https://java.net/projects/el-spec/
   Report spec bugs or RFE for el.next

* RI: https://java.net/projects/uel/
   Maven artifacts available from Maven Central
   Download source and report RI bugs

* Integrated in Glassfish 4.0: https://glassfish.java.net/

You can listen to this session in early October on Parleys.com.

Friday Sep 13, 2013

Josh Juneau – Learning More at JavaOne

Jython expert Josh Juneau on Java development today.[Read More]

Thursday Jun 27, 2013

An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7

Up on otn/java is a new article by Oracle senior software engineer Mahesh Kannan, titled “An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7.0,” which explains the new batch processing capabilities provided by JSR 352 in Java EE 7. Kannan explains that “Batch processing is used in many industries for tasks ranging from payroll processing; statement generation; end-of-day jobs such as interest calculation and ETL (extract, load, and transform) in a data warehouse; and many more. Typically, batch processing is bulk-oriented, non-interactive, and long running—and might be data- or computation-intensive. Batch jobs can be run on schedule or initiated on demand. Also, since batch jobs are typically long-running jobs, check-pointing and restarting are common features found in batch jobs.”

JSR 352 defines the programming model for batch applications plus a runtime to run and manage batch jobs. The article covers feature highlights, selected APIs, the structure of Job Scheduling Language, and explains some of the key functions of JSR 352 using a simple payroll processing application. The article also describes how developers can run batch applications using GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.0.

Kannan summarizes the article as follows:

“In this article, we saw how to write, package, and run simple batch applications that use chunk-style steps. We also saw how the checkpoint feature of the batch runtime allows for the easy restart of failed batch jobs. Yet, we have barely scratched the surface of JSR 352. With the full set of Java EE components and features at your disposal, including servlets, EJB beans, CDI beans, EJB automatic timers, and so on, feature-rich batch applications can be written fairly easily.”

Check out the article here.

About

Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

duke
Links


Search

Archives
« February 2015
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1
2
4
7
8
9
10
12
13
14
15
16
18
19
20
21
22
24
25
26
27
28
       
       
Today