Friday Sep 06, 2013

JavaOne 2013 with Markus Eisele: Sins and Security in Java EE

Markus Eisele shares his expertise on Java EE.[Read More]

Wednesday Jun 20, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part One

A new article, the first of two parts, now up on otn/java by Oracle Evangelist and JavaFX expert, James L. Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML, Part One,” shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language (FXML) to define the UI in enterprise applications.

As Weaver explains, “JavaFX 2.0 is an API and runtime for creating Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). JavaFX was introduced in 2007, and version 2.0 was released in October 2011. One of the advantages of JavaFX 2.0 is that the code can be written in the Java language using mature and familiar tools.”

He goes on to show how to use the potential of FX Markup Language, which comes with JavaFX 2.0, to efficiently define the user interface for enterprise applications. FXML functions to enable the expression of the UI using XML. “Classes that contain FXML functionality are located in the javafx.fxml package,” says Weaver, “and they include FXMLLoader, JavaFXBuilderFactory, and an interface named Initializable.”

Weaver’s article offers a sample application that shows how to use the capabilities of FXML and JavaFX 2.0 to create an enterprise app.

Have a look at the article here.

Wednesday May 23, 2012

Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications, Part Two

Java Champion, Oracle Java Evangelist, and JavaFX expert Jim Weaver, has published Part Two of his article, "Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications" on otn/java. Weaver continues to explore the possibilities of the TweetBrowser application, focusing now on new techniques and best practices that include:

* Leveraging a JavaFX cascading style sheet
* Implementing springs and struts in the UI
* Using a ternary operation in binding expressions
* Defining JavaFX properties
* Leveraging a Popup to implement a dialog box
* Using WebView to display a Web page

As Weaver emphasizes, there is a vast array of techniques and best practices that can be used in JavaFX applications. For example:

The JavaFX cascading style sheet (CSS) enables users to modify the appearance of an application.

The springs and struts concept enables a fixed horizontal strut and a variable horizontal spring so that an application can appear the way developers want it to appear, regardless of the size of the scene or the type of platform.

Go here to learn more about the rich possibilities of JavaFX 2.0 and enterprise applications.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

JCP.next, JSR 348 -- Towards a New Version of the Java Community Process

At JavaOne 2011, Tuesday's mid-day JCP discussion, presented by Heather VanCura, Oracle Manager, JCP Program, and Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, explored some big news about the JCP. Oracle's commitment to greater transparency, participation, and openness is coming through loud and clear in JSR 348, "Towards a new version of the Java Community Process" -- otherwise known as JCP.next.

The main improvements, at this stage, involve gaining greater transparency by requiring, rather than suggesting, that all development is done on open mailing lists and issue trackers.  Furthermore, the recruiting process for Expert Group members will be publicly viewable, and ways to disclose TCK testing process results will be investigated - currently, the public is rarely aware of the results of the TCK testing process. All of these developments are designed to result in a more public, open, accessible and transparent JCP.

JSR 348 passed through a Pubic Review Ballot in mid-September with results for the SE/EE Executive Community showing 14 YES votes, one Abstain (Google) and one non-vote (VMWare). Oracle expects the initial version of JSR 348 to be concluded in October 2011, offering simple changes that will be quickly implemented. A subsequent second JSR, to be filed soon afterward, will tackle more complex issues, including any changes required to the Java Specification Participation Agreement (JSPA).

The JSPA is defined by the JCP as "a one-year, renewable agreement between you [[the participant in the agreement]] and Oracle America. It entitles you to review and comment on JSRs during the Community Review period - after they are initially approved by their sponsoring Expert Group and before they are open for Public Review. The agreement carries an annual fee, depending on your Member category."

The success of the Java community depends upon an open and transparent JCP, so JCP.next is worthy of our praise and attention.

About

Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

duke
javeone logo
Links


Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
2
5
6
7
12
13
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today