Friday Sep 26, 2014

Strategy, Technical and Community Keynotes

Start JavaOne with the Strategy and Technical keynotes to learn about the strategy and roadmaps as well as technical insights. The keynotes will be on Sunday, September 28 from 12:45p.m. to 3:00p.m., at Moscone North, Hall D. If you can't make it to JavaOne, Watch them live online

In Strategy keynote, you will learn how to create the future with Java from leading Oracle experts in the Java development organization. They will showcase how Java is driving developer innovation, revolutionizing application development, and improving application services for IoT, enterprise architectures, and cloud computing.

In the Technical keynote, the architects of Java 8 will give you their insights into this revolutionary release, and start to reveal what is coming in Java 9, Java 10, and beyond.

[Read More]

Tuesday Sep 02, 2014

Greg Wilkins' Jetty/Servlet Sessions at JavaOne 2014

By Guest Blogger Reza Rahman

For the Java EE track at JavaOne 2014 we are highlighting some key sessions and speakers to better inform you of what you can expect, right up until the start of the conference.

To this end we recently interviewed Greg Wilkins. Greg is the mastermind behind Jetty and a long-time key contributor to the JCP, particularly for the foundational Servlet specification. In fact Greg is likely to be instrumental in the upcoming Servlet 4 specification slated to be included in Java EE 8. He will likely be the only person in the Servlet 4 expert group that is also part of the IETF HTTP 2 working group. We wanted to talk to Greg about his Jetty/Servlet sessions at JavaOne 2014 and HTTP 2 generally:

font-family: Arial, Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 18px;">Greg has several sessions on the track that he talked about:

  • Jetty Features: In his open-ended Birds-of-a-Feather session, Greg will share the latest features added and to be considered in Jetty.
  • Into the Wild with Servlet Async IO: In this deeply technical session, Greg will be exploring the ins-and-outs of the Servlet 3.1 asynchronous I/O feature. If this is a topic that interests you, the session is probably your best opportunity to gain knowledge from a true subject matter expert.

Bear in mind, Oracle's own Ed Burns will have a detailed session on Servlet 4/HTTP 2. Besides Greg's sessions, we have a very strong program for the Java EE track and JavaOne overall - just explore the content catalog. If you can't make it, you can be assured that we will make key content available after the conference just as we have always done.

Friday Sep 06, 2013

Java Champion/Rock Star Adam Bien at JavaOne 2013

Java Champions are developers who have made important contributions to the Java community; JavaOne Rock Stars are developers who have given highly rated sessions at JavaOne. Adam Bien is both – and one of the most distinguished Java developers in the community. He is an Expert Group member for the Java EE 6/7, EJB 3.X, JAX-RS and JPA 2.X JSRs and is an architect and developer for Java SE and Java EE projects. He has edited several books about JavaFX, J2EE, and Java EE, and is the author of Real World Java EE Patterns—Rethinking Best Practices, and Real World Java EE Night Hacks.

Bien is a Top Java Ambassador 2012, and JavaOne 2009, 2011, 2012 Rock Star. If all this were not enough, he was, in 2010, named Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year.

His 2013 sessions include:

CON2196: “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications”
CON2229: “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications”
CON2230:  “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications”
CON2231: “Demystifying Java EE”
UGF10369: “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development”

Q: Tell us about your JavaOne sessions.

Bien: In “Cool NetBeans Tips and Tricks for Java EE 7 Development,” I will introduce my favorite NetBeans features. I think I may surprise some attendees with NetBean's productivity and effectiveness.

In “Architecting Enterprise JavaFX 8 Applications,” I would like to introduce a Model View Presenter Architecture with Dependency Injection based on a "framework," only containing two classes. I would also like to highlight the interaction with SceneBuilder, the JavaFX WYSIWYG editor, without being too heavily dependent on it.

In the session "Demystifying Java EE," I will discuss some recurring misconceptions about the concepts and inner workings of Java EE. There is no magic in Java EE – Java EE 7 is very effective, if you follow some rules.

In “Lean and Opinionated Java EE 7 Applications,” I will introduce opinionated approaches and best practices for the design and implementation of Java EE 7 applications. I'm probably going to shock some architects, but the developers should like this session.

In “Unit Tests Don’t Break: Stress-Testing Java EE Applications,” I plan to stress test a Java EE 7 application and monitor the results in real time. Stress testing is incredibly important and sometimes not even a part of the development cycle.

Q: In addition to your sessions, what do you have planned for JavaOne?

Bien: JavaOne is one of the few conferences where I attend other sessions -- from dawn to dusk. In recent years there was not always time to pick lunch. At NetBeans/GlassFish days before JavaOne I will probably meet some Java friends, while at the actual JavaOne I’ve never managed to do that. The technical content is too good and there is not enough time between the sessions.

Q: Tell us about what’s happening with Enterprise JavaFX 8 apps.

Bien: In the recent edition of airhacks.com I started with HTML 5, but most of the attendees waited for Java FX 8 news. There are a lot of Swing applications out there. Migration from Swing to JavaFX is one of the FAQs. Also JavaFX is "just" Java. You can develop now from the User Interface to the back end using the same language, tools, and environments. You can use the same debugger, profiler or memory analyzer for all of your application tiers and layers. JavaFX suits perfectly enterprise application needs.

Q: What have you been working on lately?

Bien: I’ve helped my customers implement Java EE 7 and JavaFX applications. Also, I ported lightfish.adam-bien.com to Java EE 7 and GlassFish v4 and was even able to simplify the code. I also ported Apache FTP Mina to JavaEE7: http://e2ftp.adam-bien.com

Q: What are your expectations for Java EE 7? For Java SE 8?

Bien: I was already very happy with Java EE 6, so Java EE 7 can only exceed my expectations. I'm using daily builds of JavaFX coming with JDK 1.8 for my "leisure" activities. Here I would expect more stability and even better performance. 

Q: How do you assess the state of Java today?

Bien: Java is more interesting for building apps, than ever. And the interest is huge. This year there is an increased tendency to sell out workshops, sessions and conferences. Java 8 together with Java EE 7 and JavaFX 8 will make it even more interesting.

Java has only one problem: its age. We tend to forget how performant, scalable, ubiquitous, and "cutting edge" the Java ecosystem actually is.

Q: What should Java developers understand about unit testing?

Bien: Don't overdo it. Statistics do not matter. Test complex stuff first -- and there is no difference between writing tests for Java SE and Java EE applications

Q: Tell us about ways NetBeans can be used for Java EE 7 development?

A: With NetBeans I'm still able to surprise seasoned developers with productivity without any magic. As a contractor/freelancer I really don't like to spend any time with IDE maintenance and setup. With NetBeans I'm able to set up my full Java EE environment in about a minute on Linux, Windows or Mac. Without any plugins, configurations or restarts. For that reason, I'm using NetBeans daily builds without any friction. What I like the most: NetBeans supports me with integrated code completion, JavaDoc, hints and occasional helpers on demand (like, e.g., creation of beans.xml or persistence.xml) without excessive code generation or opaque wizards. You can achieve 80% with two shortcuts: ctrl + space and alt + enter.

Adam Bien’s Blog

Wednesday Jan 16, 2013

JavaFX and Java EE with Johan Vos!

Johan Vos is the co-founder and CTO of LodgOn, a company focused on “Java software for enabling communities.” In an interview, he shares his experience creating applications with JavaFX for the front-end and Java EE in the back-end. For one of clients, he created a badge-based rewarding system, which tracks user participation in social media and at events.

He sees a wealth of opportunities with JavaFX as client development platform and with Java EE as a back-end.  The challenge lies in “how you can connect the back-end servers with small devices like tablets, phones and embedded devices.” The opportunity is that “they have one thing in common which is Java”

A member of the GlassFish community, he considers JAX-RS 2.0 as an essential technology and standard. “REST interfaces and the JAX-RS API provide a standard that allows back-end applications to connect with any front-end clients”. He created the open-source project DataFX, “a JavaFX client that connects to any REST based back-end” and the open-source framework DaliCore that manages social media resources in Java EE applications. 

Watch the video interview

Thursday Sep 27, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Raghavan Srinivas

Raghavan Srinivas, affectionately known as “Rags,” is a two-time JavaOne Rock Star (from 2005 and 2011) who, as a Developer Advocate at Couchbase, gets his hands dirty with emerging technology directions and trends. His general focus is on distributed systems, with a specialization in cloud computing. He worked on Hadoop and HBase during its early stages, has spoken at conferences world-wide on a variety of technical topics, conducted and organized Hands-on Labs and taught graduate classes.

He has 20 years of hands-on software development and over 10 years of architecture and technology evangelism experience and has worked for Digital Equipment Corporation, Sun Microsystems, Intuit and Accenture. He has evangelized and influenced the architecture of numerous technologies including the early releases of JavaFX, Java, Java EE, Java and XML, Java ME, AJAX and Web 2.0, and Java Security.

Rags will be giving these sessions at JavaOne 2012:
  • CON3570 -- Autosharding Enterprise to Social Gaming Applications with NoSQL and Couchbase
  • CON3257 -- Script Bowl 2012: The Battle of the JVM-Based Languages (with Guillaume Laforge, Aaron Bedra, Dick Wall, and Dr Nic Williams)


Rags emphasized the importance of the Cloud: “The Cloud and the Big Data are popular technologies not merely because they are trendy, but, largely due to the fact that it's possible to do massive data mining and use that information for business advantage,” he explained.

I asked him what we should know about Hadoop. “Hadoop,” he remarked, “is mainly about using commodity hardware and achieving unprecedented scalability. At the heart of all this is the Java Virtual Machine which is running on each of these nodes. The vision of taking the processing to where the data resides is made possible by Java and Hadoop.”

And the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “I read recently that Java projects on github.com are just off the charts when compared to other projects. It's exciting to realize the robust growth of Java and the degree of collaboration amongst Java programmers.”

He encourages Java developers to take advantage of Java 7 for Mac OS X which is now available for download. At the same time, he also encourages us to read the caveats.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

Tuesday Sep 18, 2012

The 2012 JAX Innovation Awards

A new article, now up on otn/java, titled “The 2012 JAX Innovation Awards” reports on  important Java developments celebrated by the Awards, which were announced in July of 2012. The Awards, given by S&S Media Group, aim to, "Reward those technologies, companies, organizations and individuals that make outstanding contributions to Java." The Awards fall into three categories: Most Innovative Java Technology, Most Innovative Java Company, and Top Java Ambassador. In addition, a finalist who did not win an award receives a Special Jury prize, "in acknowledgement of their unique contribution and positive impact on the Java ecosystem."

The winners were: JetBrains for Most Innovative Java Company; Adam Bien as Top Java Ambassador; Restructure 101, created by Headway Software, as Most Innovative Technology; and Charles Nutter, Special Jury award. Each winner received a $2,500 prize. The five finalists in each category were invited to attend the JAX Conference in San Francisco, California. This year's winners each received a $2,500 prize.

JetBrains Fellow, Ann Oreshnikova, listed her favorite JetBrains innovations:

* Nullability annotations and nullability checker
* CamelCase navigation and completion
* Continuous Integration in grid (on multiple agents), in TeamCity
* IntelliJ Platform and its language support framework
* MPS language workbench
* Kotlin programming language

When asked what currently excites him about Java, Adam Bien, winner of the Java Ambassador Award, expressed enthusiasm over the increasing interest of smaller companies and startups for Java EE. “This is a very good sign,” he said. “Only a few years ago J2EE was mostly used by larger companies -- now it becomes interesting even for one-person shows. Enterprise Java events are also extremely popular. On the Java SE side, I'm really excited about Project Nashorn.”

Special Jury Prize Winner, Charles Nutter of Red Hat, remarked that, “JRuby seems to have hit a tipping point this past year, moving from ‘just another Ruby implementation’ to ‘the best Ruby implementation for X,’ where X may be performance, scaling, big data, stability, reliability, security, and a number of other features important for today's applications.

Check out the complete article here.

Monday Sep 10, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two

A new article by Oracle’s Java Champion Jim Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML -- Part Two,” now up on otn/java, shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language to define the UI for enterprise applications. Weaver, the author of Pro JavaFX Platform, extends the SearchDemoFXML example used in Part One to include more concepts and techniques for creating an enterprise application using FXML.

Weaver concludes the article by summarizing its content, “FXML provides the ability to radically change the UI without modifying the controller. This task can be accomplished by loading different FXML documents, leveraging JavaFX cascading style sheets, and creating localized resource bundles. Named parameters can be used with these features to provide relevant information to an application at startup.”


Check out the article here.





Tuesday Aug 14, 2012

Enterprise JavaFX Deployment with LightView: Part 3 now on otn/java

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, now up on otn/java, titled “Enterprise JavaFX Deployment with LightView: Part 3,” explores ways to use Maven 3 to build and deploy the LightView application in all available deployment modes. In addition, Bien shows how to sign and deploy LightView with a Java EE 6 application.

Bien explains the basics:

“LightView uses the HTTP (REST) protocol to communicate with the back-end server. For the realization of back-end communication, an external library—the Jersey client—is used. LightView connects with the back end (LightFish) at startup time, so it is not suitable to lazy-load the Jersey dependencies for optimization purposes. Furthermore, multiple JAR files are hard to handle for standalone applications; you have to set up the class path correctly and keep all the moving parts consistent. The most convenient way to deploy Java (and JavaFX) applications is simply by starting them with java -jar my-killer-app.jar and deploying a single file that contains all the dependencies.”

He shows how the class files are packaged with the javafxpackager, which is shipped with the JavaFX 2 SDK, using the exec-maven-plugin and explains the core tasks achieved by Maven and describes the what javafxpackager does behind the scenes. He then shows how the LightView application operates and interacts with LightFish.

Bien concludes by emphasizing that the richness of JavaFX lies in the fact that it is another Java library. “Because JavaFX is ‘just’ an additional Java library, all of the established build, test, and deployment infrastructure can be reused. You can develop JavaFX applications using any integrated development environment (IDE) you like. And best of all, you can use a single language in a project, from the Java EE back end to the JavaFX front end.”

Check out the article here.

Tuesday Jul 03, 2012

The Enterprise Side of JavaFX: Part Two

A new article, part of a three-part series, now up on the front page of otn/java, by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX,” shows developers how to implement the LightView UI dashboard with JavaFX 2. Bien explains that “the RESTful back end of the LightView application comes with a rudimentary HTML page that is used to start/stop the monitoring service, set the snapshot interval, and activate/deactivate the GlassFish monitoring capabilities.”

He explains that “the configuration view implemented in the org.lightview.view.Browser component is needed only to start or stop the monitoring process or set the monitoring interval.”

Bien concludes his article with a general summary of the principles applied:

“JavaFX encourages encapsulation without forcing you to build models for each visual component. With the availability of bindable properties, the boundary between the view and the model can be reduced to an expressive set of bindable properties. Wrapping JavaFX components with ordinary Java classes further reduces the complexity. Instead of dealing with low-level JavaFX mechanics all the time, you can build simple components and break down the complexity of the presentation logic into understandable pieces. CSS skinning further helps with the separation of the code that is needed for the implementation of the presentation logic and the visual appearance of the application on the screen. You can adjust significant portions of an application's look and feel directly in CSS files without touching the actual source code.”

Check out the article here.

Wednesday Jun 20, 2012

Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part One

A new article, the first of two parts, now up on otn/java by Oracle Evangelist and JavaFX expert, James L. Weaver, titled “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML, Part One,” shows developers how to leverage the power of the FX Markup Language (FXML) to define the UI in enterprise applications.

As Weaver explains, “JavaFX 2.0 is an API and runtime for creating Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). JavaFX was introduced in 2007, and version 2.0 was released in October 2011. One of the advantages of JavaFX 2.0 is that the code can be written in the Java language using mature and familiar tools.”

He goes on to show how to use the potential of FX Markup Language, which comes with JavaFX 2.0, to efficiently define the user interface for enterprise applications. FXML functions to enable the expression of the UI using XML. “Classes that contain FXML functionality are located in the javafx.fxml package,” says Weaver, “and they include FXMLLoader, JavaFXBuilderFactory, and an interface named Initializable.”

Weaver’s article offers a sample application that shows how to use the capabilities of FXML and JavaFX 2.0 to create an enterprise app.

Have a look at the article here.
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