Tuesday Dec 03, 2013

Hackergarten at Conferences

In this video interview, senior architects Andres Almiray and Swen Reimers discussed hackagarten event taking place during the conferences. "A hackergarten is group of people coming together for a couple of hours. We decide the open source projects we want to code on. It can be fixing a bug, adding a new feature, creating a screencast, testing features and giving feedback to the project. The goal is to contribute to an open source project" explained Andres.

Devoxx Hackergarten focused on Java EE Lambda projects this year. Swen was the project lead and mentor for the Lambda projects. Some of them worked on JavaFX and Lambda event threads. "We discussed why things would not fit in an API, the lambda syntax, and what is available or not" Swen mentioned. They are running hackergarten around the world. The next ones will be at JFokus, JavaLand and the monthly events in Basel, Switzerland.

Monday Nov 25, 2013

Lego, Robots and Java!

In this video, Java Evangelist Angela Caicedo talked about her new Duchess robot built with Lego Mindstorm. "We are moving into the Internet of Things and I am looking for cool devices that we can connect and use Java" said Angela   

The robot is connected to touch and color sensors, has a gyroscope to orient and prevent it from falling, 2 motors for the wheels and another for arms, and an infrared sensor for the remote control. 

Tuesday Nov 12, 2013

Don't Miss Out at Devoxx!!!

Come by IoT Hack Fest which starts with the session: kickstart your Raspberry Pi and/or Leap Motion project, part II on Tuesday from 9:30am to 12:00pm to learn how to start a project with the Raspberry Pi and Leap Motion. In the afternoon, you can still join a project and create your own project with the help of experts on Raspberry Pi, Leap Motion and other boards. 

At the Oracle booth, Java experts will be available  to answer your  questions and demo the new features of the Java Platform, including Java Embedded, JavaFX, Java SE and Java EE. This year, the chess game that was first demoed at JavaOne keynotes last September will be showcased at Devoxx. 

Duke is coming to Devoxx this year. You can get your picture taken with Duke on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday (Nov. 12-14) from 12:00 to 18:00

Beer bash will be Tuesday from 17:30-19:30 and Wednesday/Thursday from 18:00 to 20:00 at the booth. Oracle is raffling off five Raspberry Pi's and a number of books every day. Make sure to stop by and get your badge scanned to enter the raffle. Raffles are Tuesday at 19:15 and Wednesday/Thursday at 19:45 at the Oracle booth. 

The main conference sessions from Oracle Java experts are: 
Wednesday 13 November
Beyond Beauty: JavaFX, Parallax, Touch, Raspberry Pi, Gyroscopes, and Much More
Angela Caicedo, Senior Member, Technical Staff, Oracle Room 7, 12:00–13:00
Lambda: A Peek Under the Hood, Brian Goetz, Software Architect, Oracle Room 8, 12:00–13:00
In Full Flow: Java 8 Lambdas in the Stream, Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle Room 8, 14:00–15:00
The Modular Java Platform and Project Jigsaw, Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect, Java Platform Group, Oracle, Room 8, 15:10–16:10
The Curious Case of JavaScript on the JVM, Attila Szegedi, Principal Member, Technical Staff, Oracle, Room 5, 16:40–17:40
Is It a Car? Is It a Computer? No, It’s a Raspberry Pi JavaFX Informatics System.
Simon Ritter, Principal Technology Evangelist, Oracle Room 7, 16:40–17:40

Thursday 14 November
Java EE 7: What’s New in the Java EE Platform Linda DeMichiel, Consulting Member, Technical Staff, Oracle, Room 8, 10:50–11:50
Java Microbenchmark Harness: The Lesser of the Two Evils, Aleksey Shipilev, Principal Member, Technical Staff, Oracle. Room 6, 14:00–15:00
Practical Restful Persistence, Shaun Smith, Senior Principal Product Manager, Oracle Room 8, 17:50–18:50

Friday 15 November
Avatar.js, Server-Side JavaScript on the Java Platform, Jean-Francois Denise, Software Developer, Oracle Room 8, 11:50–12:50

Monday Nov 11, 2013

Hack Fest Going Strong!

Today was the first day of  the IoT Hack Fest at Devoxx, the Java developer conference in Belgium.  The IoT Hack Fest started with the Raspberry Pi & Leap Motion hands-on lab. Vinicius Senger introduced the Java Embedded, Arduino and Raspberry Pi. Java Champion and ZeroTurnaround Geert Bevin presented the Leap Motion, a controller sensing your hands and fingers to play games by controlling the mouse for example. "Programmers are cooler than musicians because they can create an entire universe using all senses" explained Geert

Participants started building applications in teams using Raspberry Pi, sensors and relays. One team tested the performance of Tomcat, Java EE and Java Embedded Suite on the Raspberry Pi. Another used built an text animation using a LCD screen. Some teams are using the Leap Motion to close and open programs on the desktop and others are using it as a game control. 



Thursday Oct 03, 2013

Hands on with Oracle Java Cloud Service in Java Magazine

The latest issue of Java Magazine, which takes as its theme “Seize the Cloud,” has an article by IndicThreads founder Harshad Oak, titled “Hands on with Oracle Java Cloud Service, Part One,” that provides an introduction to Oracle’s platform-as-a-service (PaaS) Java offerings. PaaS is about renting a software platform and running a custom business application on it, thus enabling developers to focus on the business application and not have to worry about the hardware or core software platform, according to Oak.

Oak points out that, “Java EE has been the primary software platform for enterprise and server-side development for more than a decade, and it is increasingly the platform of choice even on the cloud.”

He explains that Oracle’s cloud push began in 2011, and has subsequently launched several cloud solutions that support more than 25 million cloud users worldwide. “Oracle Java Cloud Service and Oracle Database Cloud Service have been Oracle’s most visible PaaS solutions so far,” comments Oak. “Oracle’s other PaaS offerings are Oracle  Developer Cloud Service, Oracle Storage Cloud Service, and Oracle Messaging Cloud Service. Oracle Developer Cloud Service simplifies development with an automatically provisioned development platform that supports the complete development lifecycle. Oracle Storage Cloud Service enables businesses to store and manage digital content in the cloud. Oracle Messaging Cloud Service provides an infrastructure that enables communication between software components by sending and receiving messages via a single messaging API, establishing a dynamic, automated business workflow environment.”

All in all, the article examines the Java PaaS space and presents guidelines in selecting a Java PaaS service. It offers a basic description of Oracle’s Java PaaS solution—Oracle Java Cloud Service—and its capabilities. Looking ahead, Part 2 will go deeper into Oracle Java Cloud Service by showing how to develop and deploy a Java EE application on it.

Check out the latest issue of Java Magazine.

Thursday Sep 26, 2013

Session Report: 50 New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 minutes

 by Timothy Beneke

On Tuesday afternoon, noted Java EE authors Arun Gupta and Antonio Goncalves offered a whirlwind tour of new features in “Java EE 7: Fifty New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 Minutes”. Gupta is legendary at Oracle for his hard work and astute grasp of the Java EE platform. His blog offers a wealth of insight into Java EE and other Java matters. He is the author, most recently, of Java EE 7 Essentials published by O’Reilly. Goncalves is one of the most highly regarded writers on EE anywhere and the author of Beginning Java EE 7, published by Apress.

Java EE 7’s new features enhance HTML5 support, increase developer productivity, and further improve how enterprise demands can be met. Developers will write significantly less boilerplate code, have better support for the latest Web applications, and gain access to enhanced scalability and richer, simpler functionality. The session did a stellar job of spelling out the details to a packed house.

With four new components (WebSocket, JSON-P, batch, and concurrency), and three old ones significantly updated (JAX-RS, JMS, and EL), along with other significant changes to the platform, a lot of new functionality has been added.

They divided the new Java EE 7 features into 19 categories and explained an average of two to three features in each category.  Here were the categories:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346)
Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349)
Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318)
Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236)
JPA 2.1 (JSR 338)
JTA 1.2 (JSR 907)
EJB 3.2 (JSR 345)
JMS 2.0 (JSR 343)
Servlet 3.1 (JSR 340)
Web Socket 1.0 (JSR 356)
Expression Language 3.0 (JSR 341)
JSF 2.2 (JSR 344)
JAX-RS 2.0 (JSR 339)
JSON-P 1.0 (JSR 353)
Batch 1.0 (JSR 352)
JavaMail 1.5 (JSR 919)
JCA 1.7 (JSR 322)
Java Connector Architecture
Default Resources

Here are just a few of the high points:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346) enables finer scanning control and the ability to veto the processing of a class or package. Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349) allows for method validation and the ability to pre/post conditions on method and constructors. Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318) focused on the ability to associate an Interceptor associated with a constructor and the ability to prioritize interceptor bindings.

For Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236), the emphasis was on ManagedExecutor with a focus on:
* User threads in Java EE applications
* The ability to support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* And to extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)

Further emphasis in concurrency was on ManagedThreadFactory and DynamicProxy.

Dynamic Proxy:
* Creates dynamic proxy objects, and adds contextual information available for applications running in Java EE environment
* It supports Classloading, JNDI, Security, …

Also covered as part of concurrency: ManagedExecutor
* User threads in Java EE applications
* Support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* Extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)
– java.util.concurrent package

In addition: ManagedScheduledExecutor
* Managed version of ScheduledExecutorService
* Submit delayed or periodic tasks

For JPA 2.1 (JSR 338), standardized database schema generation and the ability to define additional indexes in schema generation were emphasized. JTA 1.2 (JSR 907) was praised for its capacity for transaction management on Managed Beans as a CDI interceptor binding; in addition, it offers CDI scope whose lifecycle is scoped to the currently active JTA transaction.

They discussed WebSocket and annotated server endpoint which enables full-duplex bi-directional communication over a single TCP connection.

JSON Builder creates an object model (or an array) in memory by adding elements. JsonParser is an event-based parser that can read JSON data from a stream.

All in all, it was an impressive display of Java SE 7 expertise.

Java EE 7 Essentials by Arun Gupta

Beginning Java EE 7 by Antonio Goncalves

Be sure to check out Parleys.com in early October to listen to the entire session. It's well worth it.

Wednesday Sep 25, 2013

Session Report: Demystifying Java EE

Adam Bien, who is not only a Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star, but was named in 2010 as Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year, spoke to an enthusiastic crowd where he addressed some core issues about Java EE. He encouraged questions – “The more heretical or offensive the better.” It was obvious that Bien loves to think about and code in Java. He remarked, “The more I code the happier I am”. Spoken like a hard-core Java developer!

First, he asked, “What is Java EE? Innovation vs. Standardization”?  For Bien, Java EE is nothing but a release of co-existing APIs. Before Java EE, there was a mess with lots of application servers, with absolutely no chance of finding two application servers with similar APIs. Java EE resulted in a huge simplification. Now with Java EE 7 a wealth of are applications available. Java EE, insisted Bien, was never about innovation because building a standard precludes innovation. “Java EE will always lag behind,” he observed. “For instance, Hibernate will always have more features than JPA. Spring will always have more features than CDI. Java EE is the 80% that makes products work. It was never about innovation.”

He boiled down the whole point of Java EE: “What matters are small WARs – the smaller the WAR, the faster the build and deployment. The faster the build and deployment, the more productive you become,” he insisted. He explained that Java EE enables you to not put everything into the WAR and place as much as possible on the application server and less on the WAR. He explained that most of his WARs in Java EE 6 or Java EE 7 projects are very small

Bien asked, “Are EJBs bloated?” He explained that the question implies some voodoo stuff behind the scenes making EJBs bloated. He offered a means to answer this question.

He went on to answer a wealth of questions in a way that was thoughtful, incisive, witty and, at times, a bit provocative.

Here's some of the topics/issues (pulled directly from his slides) that Adam touched on in this fast-paced session:

*Do we need transactions?
*Is Dependency Injection Black Magic, VooDoo, or both?
*Is EJB pooling needed? Are EJBs bloated? What happens, if you violate the EJB programming restrictions?
*Why AOP didn't take off in Java EE?
*Stateless vs. Stateful programming model?
*HA without a Cluster?
*Are there any POJOs out there? What happens during deployment?
*Is Java EE faster than J2EE? Does JMS 2.0 scale and perform well? Is Java EE only suitable for the "big" enterprise?
*Is JSF the silver bullet? What is the deal with CORBA and RMI?
*How to unit test Java EE applications? Why we don't build a best of breed server from scratch?

This was a lively, entertaining and information-packed session. Just what you would expect from a pro developer as Adam Bien. I highly recommend viewing this session.

Adam Bien’s Blog
Check out Parleys.com where you can listen to the session in early October.

Tuesday Sep 24, 2013

Session Report: JSR 341: Expression Language 3.0

Ed Burns, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, and Kinman Chung, Principle Member of Technical Staff, both at Oracle, presented a session on Monday in which they described new features in JSR 341, Expression Language (EL) 3.0. They discussed the APIs for the use of EL in standalone environments and EL syntax for new operators, plus lambda expressions, and support for collection objects, all the while offering copious code illustrations.

Burns remarked that he was pleased that Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star Adam Bien had referred to EL 3.0 as “the hidden gem of Java EE”. “I don’t know how hidden it is,” said Burns, “but I think it’s a gem.”

He discussed the origins of EL, which has a long and active history in the Java platform. EL began in 2004 as part of the Java Standard Tag Library (JSTL 1.0), moved to JSP 2.0 in 2006, and became an independent specification with JSR 341 in 2011. It is used in JSF, CDI, and Avatar. Now, 9 years after its inception, it is an independent specification that is heavily used in JSF.   

Burns observed that the presence of EL is the key differentiator between Java server and non-java server stacks. “Java server-based web frameworks are likely to use EL,” said Burns. “When you show someone who is not familiar with EL how easy it is to move things together from disparate parts of your application, it’s very compelling.”

The most important feature that EL 3 brings is lambda expressions – developers do not have to wait until Java SE 8 is released. It all runs on Java EE 7, which requires Java SE 7 -- which means that it is currently available. Burns gave a brief discussion of lambda expressions, which basically behave like an anonymous function -- lambdas in EL are EL expressions. They offer full access to the EL environment within the body of the EL lambda expression, something not available from Java SE lambdas. “You won’t be able to refer to other EL things from a plain old SE lambda expression,” said Burns.

The goal of EL 3 is to provide greater expressive power for applications and to use it outside of Java EE. Burns and Chung provided an overview of collection operations and explained EL’s support for stand-alone environments. EL 3 is easy to use outside of Java EE and provides standard data structures: ELContext; ELResolvers; and local variable and function repositories.

They explained that it enables direct EL operations and has: EL expression evaluation; Bean definition; and Function definition. They emphasized that other key parts of Java EE can also be used standalone, such as: Bean Validation; Persistence (JPA); and Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI). They encouraged developers to consider the possibilities for cloud deployment in: Defining functions and variables and defining beans.

They spent the rest of the session illustrating their key points with a healthy dose of code.

Links and Downloads:
* JSR 341: http://www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=341
    Download spec and API javadocs

* Project home: https://java.net/projects/el-spec/
   Report spec bugs or RFE for el.next

* RI: https://java.net/projects/uel/
   Maven artifacts available from Maven Central
   Download source and report RI bugs

* Integrated in Glassfish 4.0: https://glassfish.java.net/

You can listen to this session in early October on Parleys.com.

Tuesday Sep 17, 2013

A Conversation with Java Champion Johan Vos

A new interview is now up on otn/java. In it, Johan Vos, a highly regarded Java Champion whose focus is on combining the strengths of back-end systems and embedded devices, provides his insightful take on what’s happening in the world of Java technology. His favorite technologies are currently Java EE/Glassfish at the backend and JavaFX at the front-end. He is a co-author of Pro JavaFX 2, and will be offering two sessions at JavaOne 2013.  

In the interview, Vos summarizes his sessions:

“In ‘Building Social Software on Top of Java EE 7 with DaliCore,’ I’ll show how you can integrate social software functionality into Java EE 7 applications. Many enterprise applications can benefit from some kinds of integration with e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc., without jeopardizing the user’s privacy and without giving up ownership of the data. The DaliCore framework adds the concept of User and OnlineAccount to the Java EE world, and provides the coupling with existing social networks. This saves lots of project-specific boilerplate code. This approach works both in web-applications as well as in desktop applications.

In ‘DataFX: The Best Way to Get Real-World Data into Your JavaFX Application,’ Hendrik Ebbers and I will present DataFX 2, a framework that helps JavaFX developers to populate JavaFX controls with real-world data. Now that JavaFX is beyond the stage of demos and POCs, it becomes important that the fake data used in demos be replaced with real data, often coming from back-end servers and databases. Apart from the regular cases where a JDBC source or a RESTful web service is queried, we will also show how changes in the local data can be propagated to the backend again...”

In discussing his efforts to combine Java EE and JavaFX, Vos remarks: “I am convinced that these two technologies are complementary, and while they are completely decoupled, the combination of them can lead to great end-to-end projects. As a POC, and in order to get more realistic use cases that could benefit both DaliCore and DataFX, I started to write a JavaFX application that offers community functionality. The front-end of that application is written in JavaFX, and the back-end is using DaliCore on top of Java EE 7. In this application, lots of data is sent from and to the back-end.”

In addition, Vos discusses his experiences with Java EE 7 and Java SE 8, the revolution that lambda expressions bring to Java, the client aspect of Java, how JavaFX fits into Java SE 8, and much more.

Check out the interview here.

Friday Sep 13, 2013

Josh Juneau – Learning More at JavaOne

Jython expert Josh Juneau on Java development today.[Read More]
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