Thursday Jun 27, 2013

An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7

Up on otn/java is a new article by Oracle senior software engineer Mahesh Kannan, titled “An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7.0,” which explains the new batch processing capabilities provided by JSR 352 in Java EE 7. Kannan explains that “Batch processing is used in many industries for tasks ranging from payroll processing; statement generation; end-of-day jobs such as interest calculation and ETL (extract, load, and transform) in a data warehouse; and many more. Typically, batch processing is bulk-oriented, non-interactive, and long running—and might be data- or computation-intensive. Batch jobs can be run on schedule or initiated on demand. Also, since batch jobs are typically long-running jobs, check-pointing and restarting are common features found in batch jobs.”

JSR 352 defines the programming model for batch applications plus a runtime to run and manage batch jobs. The article covers feature highlights, selected APIs, the structure of Job Scheduling Language, and explains some of the key functions of JSR 352 using a simple payroll processing application. The article also describes how developers can run batch applications using GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.0.

Kannan summarizes the article as follows:

“In this article, we saw how to write, package, and run simple batch applications that use chunk-style steps. We also saw how the checkpoint feature of the batch runtime allows for the easy restart of failed batch jobs. Yet, we have barely scratched the surface of JSR 352. With the full set of Java EE components and features at your disposal, including servlets, EJB beans, CDI beans, EJB automatic timers, and so on, feature-rich batch applications can be written fairly easily.”

Check out the article here.

Wednesday Jan 16, 2013

JavaFX and Java EE with Johan Vos!

Johan Vos is the co-founder and CTO of LodgOn, a company focused on “Java software for enabling communities.” In an interview, he shares his experience creating applications with JavaFX for the front-end and Java EE in the back-end. For one of clients, he created a badge-based rewarding system, which tracks user participation in social media and at events.

He sees a wealth of opportunities with JavaFX as client development platform and with Java EE as a back-end.  The challenge lies in “how you can connect the back-end servers with small devices like tablets, phones and embedded devices.” The opportunity is that “they have one thing in common which is Java”

A member of the GlassFish community, he considers JAX-RS 2.0 as an essential technology and standard. “REST interfaces and the JAX-RS API provide a standard that allows back-end applications to connect with any front-end clients”. He created the open-source project DataFX, “a JavaFX client that connects to any REST based back-end” and the open-source framework DaliCore that manages social media resources in Java EE applications. 

Watch the video interview

Wednesday Feb 15, 2012

GlassFish Adds Agility to Java EE Deployment

A new article by Julien Ponge on the front page of otn/java, titled “Adding Some Agility to Java EE Application Deployment with GlassFish,” reports on four noteworthy features in GlassFish that increase agility to Java EE application deployment.

* Session data preservation across redeployments

* Servlet fragments

* Application-scoped resources

* Application versioning

The article relies on a running example called TaskEE, a simple task list application that functions as a deployable application in which tasks are stored in a volatile Web session. Ponge shows how to morph TaskEE into TaskEEPA in order to store tasks in a relational database rather than a Web session.

Directly from the article:
“Deploying and managing Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) applications seems like a fairly established activity. Applications can be deployed, undeployed, and upgraded through a combination of deployment and undeployment. Applications use various types of resources, such as JDBC connection pools or Java Message Service (JMS) destinations. Such resources need to be created, configured, and administered using an application server means, such as configuration files, command-line tools, and graphical interfaces. While the tasks do not vary much from one Java EE application server to another, each one is free to provide a broader set of features that make the developer’s and the infrastructure team’s jobs more enjoyable.”

Read the complete article here.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

Getting Started with Embedded Java -- Sense, Control, Connect, Store, Sync

At JavaOne 2011, Terrence Barr, Senior Technologist, Mobile & Embedded, Oracle Germany, presided over a two-hour HOL (Hands-On-Lab) on Monday in which he taught developers how to build an embedded Java solution that senses and controls the environment, stores data, and connects to back-end databases for synchronization and further processing. The session offered considerable detail along with step-by-step exercises as participants learned how to create the embedded EnviroTracker system and application which tracks and processes environmental data. The application interfaces with a microcontroller to read sensor input (ambient light brightness), to control output (and LED), and then further processes the sensor data.

The lab focused on:
• The benefits of Java technology in the embedded space
• The components of embedded Java platforms
• Setting up an embedded Java platform
• Interfacing between the embedded Java platform, the microcontroller, and I/O
• Accessing and controlling I/O from Java
• Processing sensor data

Barr took developers through seven basic tasks or exercises:

1. Create the EnviroTracker
2. Install the OJEC (Oracle Java ME Embedded Client) on the Development Host
The Oracle Java Micro Edition Embedded Client (OJEC) implements the CDC Platform configuration.
3. Develop and Test Your First Embedded Java Application..
4. Install OJEC on the Target Platform and Run Your Java Application
5: Understand I/O and the Arduino Microcontroller
6: EnviroTracker V1: First Contact
7: EnviroTracker V2: Continuous Monitoring and Processing

By the end of a rigorous and demanding, but satisfying two hours, attendees had built a real-world embedded system and created the EnviroTracker Application to track environmental sensor data. They learned how to install and use embedded Java runtimes and tools, and how to interface with I/O devices and microcontrollers from Java applications.

The take home message: Creating sophisticated embedded Java systems and applications is easy due to the platform independence of the Java language and runtime, the scalability of pre-existing Java skills to embedded development, and the comprehensive support provided by mature and feature-rich developer tools.

For more info, go to Terrence Barr's blog.

Thursday Aug 18, 2011

Templating with JSF 2.0 Facelets

A new article on otn/java, “Templating with JSF 2.0 Facelets,” by Deepak Vohra, offers a concise explanation of how to use Facelets, which in JavaServer Faces (JSF) 2.0, has replaced JavaServer Pages (JSP) as the default view declaration language (VDL). With Facelets, developers no longer need to configure a view handler as they once did in JSF 1.2.

From the article itself:

“Facelets is a templating framework similar to Tiles. The advantage of Facelets over Tiles is that JSF UIComponents are pre-integrated with Facelets, and Facelets does not require a Facelets configuration file, unlike Tiles, which requires a Tiles configuration file.

JSF Validators and Converters may be added to Facelets. Facelets provides a complete expression language (EL) and JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL) support. Templating, re-use, and ease of development are some of the advantages of using Facelets in a Web application.

In this article, we develop a Facelets Web application in Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse 11g and deploy the application to Oracle WebLogic Server 11g. In the Facelets application, an input text UIComponent will be added to an input Facelets page. With JSF navigation, the input Facelets page is navigated to another Facelets page, which displays the JSF data table generated from the SQL query specified in the input Facelets page. We will use Oracle Database 11g Express Edition for the data source. Templating is demonstrated by including graphics for the header and the footer in the input and the output; the graphics have to be specified only once in the template.”

Read the complete article here.

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