Sunday Sep 28, 2014

2014 Duke's Choice Award Winners

In this, the 12th year of the Duke’s Choice Awards, we are proud to recognize 12 winners for their innovative uses of Java. The 2014 winners are an eclectic bunch of developers, innovators, and educators. Some are using the Java platform to address real-world challenges to improve road and air safety, assist refugees, and increase grain crop quality and quantity to help feed the hungry. Others are promoting Java in home automation and game development, solving important technical issues, educating Africa’s Java community, and hoping to resolve a longstanding community debate.

The 2014 Duke’s Choice Award winners are

  • Air Traffic Controller Selection System, TUBITAK BILGEM Informatics and Information Security Research Center. This computer-based testing system is used to help select and vet air traffic controllers.
  • Apache DeltaSpike, Apache Software Foundation (Community Choice Award winner). With this developer toolbox for Java Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE 6 platform, developers can introduce and test new features in Java EE before they are standardized.
  • Apache TomEE, Apache Software Foundation. The TomEE server merges a certified Java EE 6 Web Profile stack with Tomcat, the leading Java web application server by market share.
  • Autonomous Vehicle Test System, Perrone Robotics for the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Perrone Robotics worked with the IIHS to develop this Java-based system to test crash avoidance systems.
  • DukeScript, Eppleton IT Consulting and the NetBeans project. This alternative to Swing, SWT, and JavaFX runs on Android and iOS and enables true cross-platform Java.
  • IBFieldbook, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center. This application helps design field trials and generate crop analysis and enhancement solutions.
  • JavaFXPorts, LodgON (Community Choice Award winner). This open source toolkit makes graphically rich Java and JavaFX available to mobile and tablet devices running iOS and Android operating systems.
  • JCertif International. Since its founding in 2010, this organization has trained 5,000 Java developers across Africa.
  • libGDX. Programmers can use this cross-platform game development framework to write, test, and debug Java games.
  • PiDome. This home automation and Internet of Things (IoT) platform marries Java and the Raspberry Pi.
  • Project JEDI, Java Education & Development Initiative (Community Choice Award winner). This community-driven organization provides free courseware and training on Java and open source technologies to colleges and universities around the world.
  • WFP Subsidy Card, e-finance for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the World Food Programme. Based on Java smartcard technology, this card helps refugees get food through secure-card wallets.

Congratulations to all the winners. Read more about them in the latest issue of Java Magazine and celebrate with the winners at the Duke's Café Open House at JavaOne on Sunday at 7 p.m.

Monday Oct 14, 2013

JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things

A new article, now up on otn/java titled “JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things,” takes a look back at the lively happenings at JavaOne 2013, which reprised the 2012 JavaOne "Make the Future Java" theme. The articles quotes JavaOne keynoter Peter Utzschneider, Vice President, Java Product Management at Oracle, who said, "There is a lot going on in the industry, with massive shifts and innovation happening which pose huge challenges and opportunities for Java."

He observed that Oracle shares a common goal with the Java community—to make Java better, stronger, more robust, and relevant for decades to come.

The article reviews the extraordinary success of the Java platform:
* There are 9 million Java developers worldwide.
* It's the #1 choice for developers.
* It's the #1 development platform.
* 3 billion mobile phones run Java.
* 100 percent of Blu-ray disc players ship with Java.
* 97 percent of enterprise desktops run Java.
* 5 billion Java Cards are in use.
* 7 billion Java Cards have been sold.
* 89 percent of desktops run Java.
* 125 million TV devices run Java.
* Five of the top-five OEMs ship Java.

A central theme of JavaOne 2013 was how Java makes a perfect fit for the coming Internet of Things (IoT):

“First,” the article points out, “the Internet of Things (IoT) is here to stay and is likely to alter our daily lives in coming years. As embedded devices get cheaper, more powerful, and more connected, and as the IoT grows, Java developers will face radical new challenges—not the least of which is security. Along with this, cloud computing has taken hold, complementing the IoT and making big and fast data available and ready to be analyzed.”

Nandini Ramani, VP of Engineering, Java Client and Embedded Platforms, Oracle, pointed out that the Java platform is in the process of being unified: "First, Moore's Law is making devices more capable. Second, Java SE is being shrunk to fit into the embedded space and smaller devices. And third, Java ME is being brought up to be in parity with Java SE."

Find out about the Duke’s Choice and Java Community Process Awards, the JavaOne DEMOgrounds, the JavaOne Codegarten and much more.
Link to it here.


Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!



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