Wednesday Sep 24, 2014

Java University with Sang Shin

Sang Shin is the founder and chief instructor at JPassion.com, a popular online learning site offering hands-on courses on Java, Java EE, the Spring framework, Java development tools, Java performance, JavaScript, jQuery, HTML5, Groovy and Grails, MySQL, Android, web services, Ruby on Rails, and Hadoop. Before founding JPassion.com, Shin was a lead technology architect and evangelist at Sun Microsystems. He frequently gives talks on various technologies to worldwide developer audiences.

Q: Tell us about the topic you will present at Java University during JavaOne.

Shin: It’s a full-day workshop about Java performance tuning
[Read More]

Thursday Feb 21, 2013

Register Now for Devoxx UK and Devoxx France 2013

There's only a little over a month to go before Devoxx UK on March 26 and 27 in London and Devoxx France on March 27 to 29 in Paris. The conference schedules are up and space is tight, so register today before they are sold out!

"Cloud, architecture and security" is a new conference track this year. Other tracks are Java SE, methodologies, Java EE, web & big data, new languages on the JVM, and future Devoxx. Developers will get a shot at peer discussions in Bird-of-a-Feathers, learn tips and tricks during quickies and get in-depth technical information in hour-long talks or in the three hour hands-on-labs.  "You could learn something that will help in your day job. Maybe it's a better use of patterns, technologies or methodologies you're utilizing right now" explains Trisha Gee, one of the Devoxx organizers

The conference also presents great networking opportunities with leaders in the Java community and renowned speakers who wrote popular technical books. Some of those well-known speakers are Kirk Pepperdine, Peter Pilgrim, Stephen Chin, Arun Gupta, and Markus Eisele, just to name a few.

Oracle is a European Platinum Partner of the three Devoxx conferences in the U.K., France and Belgium. Come and join us in London and Paris next month.

Monday Oct 22, 2012

Book: DevOps for Developers

We all know development and operations often act like silos, with "Just throw it over the wall!" being the battle cry. Many organizations unwittingly contribute to gaps between teams, with management by (competing) objectives; a clash of Agile practices vs. more conservative approaches; and teams using different sets of tools, such as Nginx, OpenEJB, and Windows on developers' machines and Apache, Glassfish, and Linux on production machines. At best, you've got sub-optimal collaboration, at worst, you've got the Hatfields and the McCoys

The book DevOps for Developers helps bridge the gap between development and operations by aligning incentives and sharing approaches for processes and tools. It introduces DevOps as a modern way of bringing development and operations together. It also means to broaden the usage of Agile practices to operations to foster collaboration and streamline the entire software delivery process in a holistic way.

Some single aspects of DevOps may not be new, for example, you may have used the tool Puppet for years already, but with a new mindset ("my job is not just to code, it's to serve the customer in the best way possible") and a complete set of recipes, you'll be well on your way to success. DevOps for Developers also by provides real-world use cases (e.g., how to use Kanban or how to release software). It provides a way to be successful in the real development/operations world.

DevOps for Developers is written my Michael Hutterman, Java Champion, and founder of the Cologne Java User Group. "With DevOps for Developers, developers can learn to apply patterns to improve collaboration between development and operations as well as recipes for processes and tools to streamline the delivery process," Hutterman explains.

Friday Nov 18, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 at Devoxx 2011

JavaFX had a big presence at Devoxx 2011 as witnessed by the number of sessions this year given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers.

  •     “JavaFX 2.0 -- A Java Developer's Guide” by Java Champions Stephen Chin and Peter Pilgrim
  •     “JavaFX 2.0 Hands On” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “Animation Bringing your User Interfaces to Life” by Michael Heinrichs and John Yoong (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Complete Guide to Writing Custom Bindings in JavaFX 2.0” by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Java Rich Clients with JavaFX 2.0” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Properties & Bindings for Experts” (and those who want to become experts) by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “JavaFX Under the Hood” by Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Open Mic” with Jasper Potts and Richard Bair


With the release of JavaFX 2.0 and Oracle’s move towards an open development model with an open bug database already created, it’s a great time for developers to take the JavaFX plunge.


One Devoxx attendee, Mark Stephens, a developer at IDRsolutions blogged about a problem he was having setting up JavaFX on NetBeans to work on his Mac. He wrote:


“I’ve tried desperate measures (I even read and reread the instructions) but it did not help. Luckily, I am at Devoxx at the moment and there seem to be a lot of JavaFX gurus here (and it is running on all their Macs). So I asked them… It turns out that sometimes the software does not automatically pickup the settings like it should do if you give it the JavaFX SDK path. The solution is actually really simple (isn’t it always once you know). Enter these values manually and it will work.”


He simply entered certain values and his problem was solved. He thanked Java Champion Stephen Chin, “for a great talk at Devoxx and putting me out of my misery.”


JavaFX in Java Magazine

Over in the November/December 2011 issue of Java Magazine, Oracle’s Simon Ritter, well known for his creative Java inventions at JavaOne, has an article up titled “JavaFX and Swing Integration” in which he shows developers how to use the power of JavaFX to migrate Swing interfaces to JavaFX. The consensus among JavaFX experts is that JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform.


In the same issue Java Champion and JavaFX maven James Weaver has an article, “Using Transitions for Animation in JavaFX 2.0”. In addition, Oracle’s Vice President of Java Client Development, Nandini Ramani, provides the keys to unlock the mysteries of JavaFX 2.0 in her Java Magazine interview.


Look for the JavaFX community to grow and flourish in coming years.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

OpenJDK Development Best Practices

At JavaOne 2011, Oracle Principal Member of Technical Staff, Kelly O’Hair, had a session on “OpenJDK Development Best Practices” that offered a lot of useful practical advice. He discussed current OpenJDK development procedures such as building, testing, code review, and creating a changeset, and integrating that changeset into a team repository.  In addition he covered "OpenJDK Developers' Guide" topics and looked at the challenges of integrating a change.

So what are the best practices when working on the JDK?
● When in doubt, ask
● When something does not work, report it
● Always be careful, rushing in changes is dangerous
● Do no harm, have a backup or backout plan
● Stay calm, nervous people make mistakes
● Be prepared for anything, because it will happen

When editing sources:
● No TABS
● Never edit the legal notices
● Respect the existing formatting
● Small surgical changes are best, easiest to review
● Well written comments are critical
● Do not assume anything about the compilers

Testcases are critical and not optional:
● Create a new one or modify an existing testcase
● Must be solid and work on all supported systems
● Must not be a resource hog (open 20,000 files)
● Must work in a shared VM mode (like a JUnit test)
● Assume someone else might be running the same test at the same time, and that someone might be you
● Continuous Build & Test
● Test gates or baseline testing
● But before you even get started making changes you must be able to completely build it and test it on your own system, this is a fundamental
● Linux builds are the easiest, so let's see what needs to happen

He suggested best practices short cuts for building:
● Always use local disk space
● Use /tmp if it has the space
● Try export HOTSPOT_BUILD_JOBS=4
● Try export ALT_PARALLEL_COMPILE_JOBS=4
● Use export NO_DOCS=true to avoid running javadoc
● Use ALT_JDK_IMPORT_PATH=${HOME}/jdk1.8.0

Kelly offered detailed principles related to testing, testing prep, editing, code review, changeset creation, why a push fails, and the team repository model.

His core ideas:
● Pick your environment, Linux is easiest
● Pick a stable state of repos, promoted build, oldest best
● Learn to build and test it, over and over, know what to expect, create a jdk to use as your import
● Editing working set files, read the Mercurial book
● Problemlist, changeset creation

Tuesday Sep 20, 2011

Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Know

Check out this fun, informative article from java.net, titled “Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Know,” by Java consultant Nadine McKenzie, that is currently featured on otn/java.

And read java.net editor Kevin Farnham’s blog about the article here.

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