Wednesday Mar 30, 2016

Last Interactive Online Java Webinar with Q&A

The Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) delivers interactive Java technical content from Java Champions and Oracle experts to your desk.  

The interactive, online event, is sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). The April 5 event is the last one in this VTS series. It features six Java technical sessions about Java EE, cloud, and Java SE API. Register now

The Java Track includes three code-heavy sessions:

Java on Mobile: Thanks to innovations in mobile JVM's and the availability of JavaFX on iOS and Android, it is now possible to write applications once (in Java) and deploy them on the major mobile platforms. In this session, we will show how easy it is to create a highly-polished Material Design Java application, and to deploy it on an Android device and an iOS device with exactly the same code used in both deployments.

Asynchronous programming in Java 8: how to use CompletableFuture: This presentation aims to explain how the patterns introduced by this interface and its implementing class are new to the Java platform, and how they fill the gap in the old Future patterns.The different models are precisely presented: how to create complex asynchronous processing pipelines, how to deal with exceptions, how to test complex code. 

Down-to-Earth Microservices with Java EE: the session explores microservices using a simple but representative example using Java EE. You'll see how the Java EE programming model and APIs like JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2 and JTA aligns with the concept of microservices.

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers: Java SE 8 brings a bounty of improvements. In this session, you will learn about Lambda expressions, a new Date and Time API, the Streams API, Completable Futures, Nashorn, Repeatable Annotations, String joiners, etc.

Thinking Beyond ORM in JPA:  This session discusses native-query support in JPA along with stored procedures and result set mappings in JPA 2.1. The presented code samples illustrate the details of the API, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Our analysis reveals applicable use cases and most popular approaches. The summary provides guidelines on how and when to utilize native queries.

Visualizing Data in the Cloud with Oracle JET: Oracle JET is a free and open source toolkit, providing a solid basis for enterprise JavaScript applications, including built-in solutions for accessibility, modularity, and data visualization. In this code-driven session, you will learn everything you need to know to create maintainable enterprise applications in JavaScript!

Tuesday Aug 14, 2012

Enterprise JavaFX Deployment with LightView: Part 3 now on otn/java

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, now up on otn/java, titled “Enterprise JavaFX Deployment with LightView: Part 3,” explores ways to use Maven 3 to build and deploy the LightView application in all available deployment modes. In addition, Bien shows how to sign and deploy LightView with a Java EE 6 application.

Bien explains the basics:

“LightView uses the HTTP (REST) protocol to communicate with the back-end server. For the realization of back-end communication, an external library—the Jersey client—is used. LightView connects with the back end (LightFish) at startup time, so it is not suitable to lazy-load the Jersey dependencies for optimization purposes. Furthermore, multiple JAR files are hard to handle for standalone applications; you have to set up the class path correctly and keep all the moving parts consistent. The most convenient way to deploy Java (and JavaFX) applications is simply by starting them with java -jar my-killer-app.jar and deploying a single file that contains all the dependencies.”

He shows how the class files are packaged with the javafxpackager, which is shipped with the JavaFX 2 SDK, using the exec-maven-plugin and explains the core tasks achieved by Maven and describes the what javafxpackager does behind the scenes. He then shows how the LightView application operates and interacts with LightFish.

Bien concludes by emphasizing that the richness of JavaFX lies in the fact that it is another Java library. “Because JavaFX is ‘just’ an additional Java library, all of the established build, test, and deployment infrastructure can be reused. You can develop JavaFX applications using any integrated development environment (IDE) you like. And best of all, you can use a single language in a project, from the Java EE back end to the JavaFX front end.”

Check out the article here.

Wednesday Feb 15, 2012

GlassFish Adds Agility to Java EE Deployment

A new article by Julien Ponge on the front page of otn/java, titled “Adding Some Agility to Java EE Application Deployment with GlassFish,” reports on four noteworthy features in GlassFish that increase agility to Java EE application deployment.

* Session data preservation across redeployments

* Servlet fragments

* Application-scoped resources

* Application versioning

The article relies on a running example called TaskEE, a simple task list application that functions as a deployable application in which tasks are stored in a volatile Web session. Ponge shows how to morph TaskEE into TaskEEPA in order to store tasks in a relational database rather than a Web session.

Directly from the article:
“Deploying and managing Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) applications seems like a fairly established activity. Applications can be deployed, undeployed, and upgraded through a combination of deployment and undeployment. Applications use various types of resources, such as JDBC connection pools or Java Message Service (JMS) destinations. Such resources need to be created, configured, and administered using an application server means, such as configuration files, command-line tools, and graphical interfaces. While the tasks do not vary much from one Java EE application server to another, each one is free to provide a broader set of features that make the developer’s and the infrastructure team’s jobs more enjoyable.”

Read the complete article here.

Friday Sep 09, 2011

Client-Side Improvements in Java 6 and Java 7 Article on OTN

Java Champion Josh Marinacci has a new article titled “Client-Side Improvements in Java 6 and Java 7” up on otn/java’s "Developer Spotlight". The article takes a tour of Swing, looks at installation, and explores substantial improvements to the client and desktop parts of Java SE 6 and Java SE 7, including the applet plug-in, the Java Deployment Toolkit, shaped and translucent windows, heavyweight-lightweight mixing, and Java Web Start.

Marinacci concludes: “Finally, desktop Java apps benefit from many of the general improvements in Java SE 7. The improved file I/O APIs offer fine-grained control over file permissions, symbolic links, and notification of file changes, plus the ability to have the operating system move and copy files at native speed.

With the improvements in Java SE 7 and a new Java language version of JavaFX available this summer, things are looking bright for client-side Java.”

Read the complete article here.


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