Tuesday Oct 18, 2011

JavaOne 2011 Recap

The 2011 JavaOne Conference, the sixteenth, had its own distinctive identity. The Conference theme, “Moving Java Forward,” coincided with the spirit that seemed to pervade the attendees – after more than a year-and-a-half of stewardship over Java, there was a clear and reassuring feeling that Oracle was doing its part to support Java and the Java community. Attendees that I spoke to felt that the conference was well put together and that the Java platform was being well served and indeed, moving forward.

For me, personally, it was a week in which my feet barely touched the ground as I rushed through tours from session to laptop to session, dashing off blogs and racing back to events, socials, awards ceremonies, BOF's and more.

The Keynotes

Start with the keynotes. Monday’s Technical Keynote debuted and open-sourced JavaFX 2.0, looked ahead to Java EE on the cloud and reminded us that there are about 6.5 billion people in the world and five billion Java Cards.

Tuesday’s Java Strategy Keynote offered Oracle's long-term vision for investment and innovation in Java.

Thursday’s Java Community Keynote while touched by the awareness of Steve Jobs’ passing, celebrated Java User Groups, Duke’s Choice and JCP award winners, and was capped off with the inimitable Java Posse.

Sessions, Sessions, and more Sessions

And then there were the sessions!

JavaFX 2.0, which was represented in more than 50 sessions, deserves special mention.

There was a lively panel discussion of the future of Java EE and the cloud.

Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter, in his session, showed off a fun gadget that worked via JavaFX 2.0.

Oracle’s Greg Bollella and Eric Jensen, gave a session titled “Telemetry and Synchronization with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB” that presented a vision of the potential future of Cyber-Physical Systems

Java Champion Michael Hüttermann explained best Agile ALM practices in a session.

Oracle’s Joseph Darcy took developers deeper into the heads and tails of Project Coin.

A JCP panel talked about JCP.next and the future of the JCP.

The JCP Awards gave recognition to some well-deserving people.

Oracle’s Kelly O’Hair gave a session on OpenJDK development best practices.

Oracle’s Terrence Barr showed developers how to get started with Embedded Java(http://blogs.oracle.com/javaone/entry/getting_started_with_embedded_java).

The Duke's Choice Awards reminded us of the sheer ingenuity of Java and Java developers.

Adam Bien, Java Champion, Java Rock Star and winner of Oracle Magazine’s ninth annual Editors' Choice award as Java Developer of the Year was all over the place.

Go to Parley’s.com to take in some of the great sessions.

The Heads and Tails of Project Coin

JavaOne 2011 - Joseph Darcy, Member of the Oracle Technical Staff, spoke to a very large,
packed conference room in his “The Heads and Tails of Project Coin” (22641) session Tuesday.
Project Coin, a central part of Java 7, was described by Darcy as “a suite of language and
library changes to make things programmers do everyday easier.”

Project Coin makes life easier by removing extra text to make programs more readable;  
encouraging the writing of programs that are more reliable; and by integrating well with past and future changes.
Darcy emphasized that these are small language changes related to specification, implementation and testing;
there are no JVM changes. Project Coin was written to coordinate with forthcoming larger language changes.

Project Coin has strong IDE support:
• IntelliJ IDEA 10.5 and later                                                                                                
• Eclipse 3.7.1 and later                                                                                                                  
• NetBeans 7.0 and later

The six Project Coin features are:  
• Binary literals and underscores in literals                                                                                
• Strings in switch                                                                                                                          
• Diamond                                                                                                                                     
• Multi-catch and more precise rethrow                                                                                
• try-with-resources                                                                                                               
• Varargs warnings

Diamond and varargs warnings enable easier-to-use generics. Multi-catch and try-with-resources allow for more concise error handling. Strings-in-switch and literal improvements result in greater consistency and clarity.

Darcy proceeded to demonstrate five of the six Project Coin features to a highly engaged audience.
Check out his session slides and you can also view this talk @ http://parleys.com/d/2663.

What’s ahead for Project Coin in Java 8? Look for very small language changes on the horizon.

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