Monday Oct 17, 2011

Java Community Keynote: Enabling Collaboration, Enabling Innovation

IBM, Java, and the Cloud

The morning JavaOne 2011 Community Keynote began with IBM, presented by Jason McGee, IBM Distinguished Engineer, Chief Architect, Cloud Computing. McGee focused on Java and Cloud computing-the challenges in the language and the JVM for running in the Cloud, how to make your applications elastic and scale well in the Cloud, and the latest innovations (driven by IBM and others) for deploying applications to the Cloud.

McGee explored several recent IBM offerings for the Cloud-including WebSphere eXtreme Scale, a Java based, in-memory data grid product for elastic scalability in Cloud environments; and IBM Workload Deployer, a Cloud deployment and management system for existing virtualized hardware. McGee ended by reiterating IBM's commitment to the Java community, noting their membership in OpenJDK as of 2010.

Community: Best Practices, Innovation, and Learning Resources

Sharat Chander, Principle Product Director, JavaOne Program Committee Chairperson, Oracle began his portion of the keynote by offering a moment of silence in respect for the passing of Apple's Steve Jobs, noting his passion and innovation in the world of technology. The Apple logo briefly appeared on the large screen.

Chander emphasized that Java isn't just about technology, it's also about community. Within this context, he first recognized Mike DeNicola, John Rose, and Patrick Curran, for their outstanding participation and leadership within the JCP this past year. And as part of ever-broadening the Java community, Chander next paid tribute to the Java Dutchess program-with over 400 groups around the world, globally connecting women in Java technology.

From there, Donald Smith, Director of Product Management, Java Platform Group, Oracle invited onstage a panel of representatives from the global Java community: Martijn Verburg, London Java Community; John Duimovich, OpenJDK; Deepak Bhole, OpenJDK; Stephen Chin, SvJugFx; and Bruno Souza, SouJava. The group noted that this was the first JavaOne conference with a community-themed keynote. In true connected community fashion, the group invited those watching the presentation to informally vote (via text message) on Java technologies and initiatives of current and future interest.

The panel members all urged active participation in Java User Groups, from both a technical and professional advancement perspective. Such community involvement not only drives open standards, they declared, but also drives innovation among vendors. The OpenJDK representatives then explored the challenges and promises of the initiative, agreeing that participants should have high expectations for openness, and to push on that. They strongly urged developers to download OpenJDK, and to use it.

Community: Moving Java Forward

Smith explored with the panel how the Java community can best take part in moving Java forward. The consensus was that the process ideally involves vision, innovation, and execution, and that the community can participate at all of these levels-getting involved via JUGs, as well as testing and submitting bug reports, and thereby helping Oracle and other Java vendors build the best and most innovative technologies. One technique being explored at some JUGs, to better facilitate participation, is to both stream them live and offer audio archives via Parleys.com. Within the context of making community content as available as possible, Oracle announced their agreement with Parleys.com to host many of the JavaOne sessions on the learning site-including video, demos, and synchronized audio/slides.

Duke's Choice Award Winners

What JavaOne would be complete without acknowledging the Duke's Choice Award Winners (this year with community input in the selection and review process). Featured onstage were representatives of Rockwell Automation, for their Java Embedded factory floor automation solutions; Sodbeans Project, for their NetBeans-based accessibility suite to aid blind software developers; and JHome, a Glassfish/Java EE-based home automation system for the control of almost any device in the home, including lamps, gates, coffee machines, and more.
Java Posse Comes to Town

To the tune of Spaghetti Western soundtrack music, representatives of the fabled Java Posse next took the stage (to Sharat Chander's mock amazement). The Java Posse site has long been known for its podcasts offering news, discussions, interviews, and "general mayhem" surrounding the world of Java. The Java Posse members emphasized what they see as the three elements of Java-the language, the platform, and (most importantly), the Java community. "We have a development community that other development platforms dream of having," they said. They promised in-depth appearances from many of the Duke's Choice Award winners. And in parting the stage, they deputized Chander as an official honorary member of the Java Posse, presenting him with a 10-gallon hat.

In closing, JavaOne participants were urged to get involved and make their voices heard-to participate in the JavaOne Community Steering Committee, to participate in the JavaOne Program Committee, to submit speaker papers, to participate in the OpenJDK project, and to join a local JUG. Chander parted by noting that JavaOne 2012 would feature a community member as one of the keynote speakers.



Learn More:

WebSphere eXtreme Scale
IBM Workload Deployer
Java Dutchess
2011 Duke's Choice Award Winners
Parleys.com
The Java Posse

The Ninth Annual Java Community Process Program Awards

In a festive room full of Java luminaries and fine food at JavaOne 2011, the 9th annual JCP Program Awards were handed out Tuesday night at the Anzu Restaurant of the Nikko Hotel. The award categories were: JCP Member/Participant of the Year; Most Innovative JSR; and Outstanding Spec Lead.

The nominees in their respective categories were:

JCP Member/Participant of the Year

--Mike DeNicola, of Fujitsu, for his role as JCP.next Working Group Lead: While not officially Spec Lead of JSR 348, Mike has contributed a lot in getting the JCP reform plans where they are at a great pace, compared to earlier efforts. Helping the JCP to be fit for the next decades of Java following the Oracle-Sun merger.

--SouJava: For tirelessly promoting the JCP, JSRs, openness, transparency and our community at large (to say nothing of Bruno Souza's marvelous cape!).

--IBM: For their participation in the OpenJDK project, which has significantly increased the momentum of Java SE.   

--London Java Community: For their efforts to involve the developer community in the activities of the JCP.   

--Doug Lea: After a long and distinguished tenure on the JCP EC, Doug Lea (along with Tim Peierls and The Apache Software Foundation) felt he had no choice but to resign at the end of 2010. In doing so, he demonstrated integrity, independence, and courage that truly sets him apart. If the JCP is to retain any shred of legitimacy and relevance in the future, it will be through the actions other members who display the traits exemplified by Doug: integrity, independence, and courage, coupled with unparalleled technical expertise and a genuine love for the Java ecosystem.

Most Innovative JSR

--JSR 321: Trusted Computing API for Java. Beside a picture book example for Agile and Transparent Expert Group work, JSR 321 also anticipated another vision of JCP.next, by being the first JSR with a known implementation in a language other than Java, called Hybrid JSR by JCP.next (Part 2 and beyond). Apart from all that, Trusted Java holds the key to a safer more reliable and trusted usage of PaaS/Cloud or other Pervasive Technologies like Social Networking and Mobile.

--JSR 334: Small Enhancements to the Java Programming Language (Project Coin): Due to the process it was run under and the requirement of participants to 'put some skin in the game'.

--JSR 292:  Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform: As the first JSR specifically designed to support languages other than Java, JSR 292 will ensure the long-term success of the Java VM.

Outstanding Spec Lead

--John Rose: (JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform) Due to his excellence in ensuring consensus across the community -- both EG members and the wider JVM language community.

--Alex Buckley: (JSR 901, Java Language Specification and JSR 924: Java Virtual Machine Specification.) For his leadership.

--Mark Reinhold: For his leadership and promotion of the first Java SE platform JSR in several years.

The Winners

JCP Member/Participant of the Year: Mike DeNicola of Fujitsu

Most Innovative JSR: JSR 292, John Rose, Oracle, spec lead for JSR 292

Outstanding Spec Lead: John Rose, Oracle: JSR 292 Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform


Community Leadership Award

Finally, the JCP Executive Committee gave a special Community Leadership Award to  Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, who was recognized for the fabulous job he has done coping with a period of substantial change and conflict in the JCP over the past 18 months.

Obviously, the work of John Rose and his team was singularly honored. But as Rose himself graciously emphasized, it was itself a great honor to be counted among his fellow nominees.

Congratulations to all involved!

JCP.next, JSR 348 -- Towards a New Version of the Java Community Process

At JavaOne 2011, Tuesday's mid-day JCP discussion, presented by Heather VanCura, Oracle Manager, JCP Program, and Patrick Curran, Chair, Java Community Process, Oracle, explored some big news about the JCP. Oracle's commitment to greater transparency, participation, and openness is coming through loud and clear in JSR 348, "Towards a new version of the Java Community Process" -- otherwise known as JCP.next.

The main improvements, at this stage, involve gaining greater transparency by requiring, rather than suggesting, that all development is done on open mailing lists and issue trackers.  Furthermore, the recruiting process for Expert Group members will be publicly viewable, and ways to disclose TCK testing process results will be investigated - currently, the public is rarely aware of the results of the TCK testing process. All of these developments are designed to result in a more public, open, accessible and transparent JCP.

JSR 348 passed through a Pubic Review Ballot in mid-September with results for the SE/EE Executive Community showing 14 YES votes, one Abstain (Google) and one non-vote (VMWare). Oracle expects the initial version of JSR 348 to be concluded in October 2011, offering simple changes that will be quickly implemented. A subsequent second JSR, to be filed soon afterward, will tackle more complex issues, including any changes required to the Java Specification Participation Agreement (JSPA).

The JSPA is defined by the JCP as "a one-year, renewable agreement between you [[the participant in the agreement]] and Oracle America. It entitles you to review and comment on JSRs during the Community Review period - after they are initially approved by their sponsoring Expert Group and before they are open for Public Review. The agreement carries an annual fee, depending on your Member category."

The success of the Java community depends upon an open and transparent JCP, so JCP.next is worthy of our praise and attention.

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Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

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