Wednesday Mar 18, 2015

Join JavaOne in Brazil

The premier Java conference in Latin America will bring together Java experts and enthusiasts for three days from June 23 to 25, 2015. Register before May 4 and you will save R$900 off the onsite price. 

Visionaries and world-renowned speakers will present conference and hands-on sessions covering five tracks, which include clients and user interface; core Java platform; Java and the Internet of Things; server side Java and the new track about Java, DevOps and the cloud.

Don’t wait, register now!

Thursday Sep 04, 2014

Interview with Nikita Salnikov-Tarnovski

Nikita Salnikov-Tarnovski is the co-founder of Plumbr, the memory leak detection product. Besides his daily technical tasks he is an active blogger, a JavaOne RockStar and a frequent conference speaker at Devoxx, JavaOne Russia, 33rd Degree, TopConf, JavaDay, GeekOut, Joker, and Jazoon.

Q: What are your JavaOne sessions about this year?

Salnikov-Tarnovski: My two talks are about identifying and solving memory leaks in applications, one conference session titled “keep memory leaks at bay” and one tutorial called “where is my memory.” Both sessions relate to how Java applications consume and use memory while running. I will discuss how to monitor your production environment; how to detect memory leaks and other memory inefficiencies; what to do if your application fails because of memory leak or becomes unbearable slow due to Garbage Collection taking too long, and so on.

Q: Are you giving tips and tricks during those sessions on how they can use Plumbr’s product?

Salnikov-Tarnovski: Last year, I talked about Java memory leaks and I used our product to present solutions. This year, I will talk about general methodology and techniques on how these problems can be detected and solved with the aid of the best tools on the market including our tool and any other freely available tools.

Q: Why are memory leaks important?

Salnikov-Tarnovski: Memory leaks are one of the top reasons why Java applications crash in production. Other memory related problems, such as inefficient Garbage Collection can make your application just stall for some arbitrarily long time. And your clients will be effected. E.g. when you hit the search button on Amazon.com and this all of a sudden takes too long, it is probably because GC kicked in and said: “Wait some 10 seconds, I will look for some garbage”.

Q: Aside from your sessions, what do you have planned for JavaOne?

Salnikov-Tarnovski: The main reason why I attend conferences - apart from talking about our product, of course – is to meet the many bright speakers and attendees. When you're a senior engineer with 12 years of experience, you want to go to conferences like JavaOne to meet your peers - people who are smarter than you- because you can learn a lot from them. You can discuss your problems and get feedback, and share your ‘war’ stories. This is the main reason why I attend conferences and I advise all my fellow engineers to go to JavaOne and other Java conferences. I'm planning to go to Java conferences as long as I am in this profession.

Learn more about Core Java sessions in the JavaOne content catalog

Wednesday Nov 21, 2012

Get Started with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder

Up on otn/java is a very useful article by Oracle Java/Middleware/Core Tech Engineer Mark Heckler, titled, “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder.”  Heckler, who has development experience in numerous environments, shows developers how to develop a JavaFX application using Scene Builder “in less time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee, while learning your way around in the process”.

He begins with a warning and a reassurance: “JavaFX is a new paradigm and can seem a bit imposing when you first take a look at it. But remember, JavaFX is easy and fun. Let's give it a try.”

Next, after showing readers how to download and install JDK/JavaFX and Scene Builder, he informs the reader that they will “create a simple JavaFX application, create and modify a window using Scene Builder, and successfully test it in under 15 minutes.”

Then readers download some NetBeans files:
EasyJavaFX.java contains the main application class. We won't do anything with this class for our example, as its primary purpose in life is to load the window definition code contained in the FXML file and then show the main stage/scene. You'll keep the JavaFX terms straight with ease if you relate them to the theater: a platform holds a stage, which contains scenes.

SampleController.java is our controller class that provides the ‘brains’ behind the graphical interface. If you open the SampleController, you'll see that it includes a property and a method tagged with @FXML. This tag enables the integration of the visual controls and elements you define using Scene Builder, which are stored in an FXML (FX Markup Language) file.

Sample.fxml is the definition file for our sample window. You can right-click and Edit the filename in the tree to view the underlying FXML -- and you may need to do that if you change filenames or properties by hand - or you can double-click on it to open it (visually) in Scene Builder.”

Then Scene Builder enters the picture and the task is soon done.

Check out the article here.

Friday Oct 12, 2012

JavaOne 2012 in Review

Noted freelance writer Steve Meloan has a new article up on otn/java, titled, “JavaOne 2012 Review: Make the Future Java” in which he summarizes the happenings at JavaOne 2012.

Along the way, he reminds us that if the future turns out to be anything like the past, Java will do fine:

The repeated theme for this year's conference was ‘Make the Future Java,’ and according to recent stats, the groundwork is already firmly in place:

    There are 9 million Java developers worldwide.
    Three billion devices run Java.
    Five billion Java Cards are in use.
    One hundred percent of Blu-ray Disc players ship with Java.
    Ninety-seven percent of enterprise desktops run Java.
    Eighty-nine percent of PC desktops run Java.

This year's content curriculum program was organized under seven technical tracks:

    Core Java Platform
    Development Tools and Techniques
    Emerging Languages on the JVM
    Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud
    Java EE Web Profile and Platform Technologies
    Java ME, Java Card, Embedded, and Devices
    JavaFX and Rich User Experiences”

Meloan artfully reminds us of how JavaOne makes learning fun.

Have a look at the article here.

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