Wednesday Jan 29, 2014

Gamification for User Groups

At the gamification session of the International Oracle User Group Community (IOUC), leaders discussed how to drive membership. Typically, they give away licenses, books and goodies to encourage attendance at monthly meetings. Others have used gamification to get their communities to brainstorm on mascot names, or post pictures and comments on social media. Hackathons also require the use of similar techniques to keep attendees motivated to create applications over several days. SouJava leader Bruno Souza successfully ran hackathons that combined brainstorming, team building, training, hacking sessions and prizes to keep participants engaged.

“Turn life into a game, drive engagement of audiences, make the experience more enjoyable and get users to come back ” are the key advantages of gamification according to user group leader Jim Bethancourt.

The forum platform Stack Overflow is a great example of running a thriving community of developers with its point systems. Contributors get rewarded with points for their useful entries and visitors easily find the most relevant and best-rated entries.

The ArabOUG has implemented a point system to keep its community active. The group gives out points to the members, who contribute applications, articles, and translations. It partnered with training organizations and other services to give its members free training and services in exchange for points. As a result, members don’t have to pay for services using online payments, which governments in many countries in North Africa and the Middle East don’t allow.

In an interview, ArabOUG leader Mohamed Chargui  explains in more detail his experience using gamification.

Monday Jan 13, 2014

Java EE 8 Community Survey - Part 2!

By Guest BloggerDavid Delabassee 

The second part of the Java EE 8 Community Survey is now open!

During the last 5 weeks, we have been positively surprised by the community responses on the first part of the survey. We have received a lot of valuable feedback! That means we have *a lot of data* to process, a really nice problem to face! Thanks to all who participated in Part 1! If you haven't, there still time to answer Part 1.

Part 2 of the survey is focusing on topics such as Cloud, Security, Logging, Deployment, Testability, etc. We are again soliciting your feedback on those different topics.

In a few weeks from now, once the results of the 2 parts have been distilled and summarized, we will share those results with the community. The next step would then be to ask you to help us prioritize those features.

Thanks in advance for helping us to set the initial directions of Java EE 8 by participating in Part 2 of the Community Survey.

Wednesday Nov 06, 2013

So Much Happening at Devoxx

Devoxx, the premier Java conference in Europe, has been sold out for a while. The organizers (thanks Stephan and crew!) cap the attendance to make sure all attendees have a great experience, and that speaks volumes about their priorities. The speakers, hackathons, labs, and networking are all first class. The Oracle Technology Network will be there, and if you were smart/lucky enough to get a ticket, come find us and join the fun:

IoT Hack Fest

Build fun and creative Internet of Things (IoT) applications with Java Embedded, Raspberry Pi and Leap Motion on the University Days (Monday and Tuesday). Learn from top experts Yara & Vinicius Senger and Geert Bevin at two Raspberry Pi & Leap Motion hands-on labs and hacking sessions. Bring your computer. Training and equipment will be provided. Devoxx will also host an Internet of Things shop in the exhibition floor where attendees can purchase Arduino, Raspberry PI and Robot starter kits. Bring your IoT wish list!

Video Interviews

Yolande Poirier and I will be interviewing members of the Java Community in the back of the Expo hall on Wednesday and Thursday. Videos are posted on Parleys and YouTube/Java. We have a few slots left, so contact me (you can DM @Java) if you want to share your insights or cool new tip or trick with the rest of the developer community. (No commercials, no fluff. Keep it techie and keep it real.) 

Oracle Keynote

Wednesday morning Mark Reinhold, Chief Java Platform Architect, and Brian Goetz, Java Language Architect will provide an update on Java 8 and beyond.

Oracle Booth

Drop by the Oracle booth to see old and new friends.  We'll have Java in Action demos and the experts to explain them and answer your questions. We are raffling off Raspberry Pi's each day, so be sure to get your badged scanned. We'll have beer in the booth each evening. Look for @Java in her lab coat. 

See you at Devoxx! 

Monday Oct 14, 2013

JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things

A new article, now up on otn/java titled “JavaOne 2013 Review: Java Takes on the Internet of Things,” takes a look back at the lively happenings at JavaOne 2013, which reprised the 2012 JavaOne "Make the Future Java" theme. The articles quotes JavaOne keynoter Peter Utzschneider, Vice President, Java Product Management at Oracle, who said, "There is a lot going on in the industry, with massive shifts and innovation happening which pose huge challenges and opportunities for Java."

He observed that Oracle shares a common goal with the Java community—to make Java better, stronger, more robust, and relevant for decades to come.

The article reviews the extraordinary success of the Java platform:
* There are 9 million Java developers worldwide.
* It's the #1 choice for developers.
* It's the #1 development platform.
* 3 billion mobile phones run Java.
* 100 percent of Blu-ray disc players ship with Java.
* 97 percent of enterprise desktops run Java.
* 5 billion Java Cards are in use.
* 7 billion Java Cards have been sold.
* 89 percent of desktops run Java.
* 125 million TV devices run Java.
* Five of the top-five OEMs ship Java.

A central theme of JavaOne 2013 was how Java makes a perfect fit for the coming Internet of Things (IoT):

“First,” the article points out, “the Internet of Things (IoT) is here to stay and is likely to alter our daily lives in coming years. As embedded devices get cheaper, more powerful, and more connected, and as the IoT grows, Java developers will face radical new challenges—not the least of which is security. Along with this, cloud computing has taken hold, complementing the IoT and making big and fast data available and ready to be analyzed.”

Nandini Ramani, VP of Engineering, Java Client and Embedded Platforms, Oracle, pointed out that the Java platform is in the process of being unified: "First, Moore's Law is making devices more capable. Second, Java SE is being shrunk to fit into the embedded space and smaller devices. And third, Java ME is being brought up to be in parity with Java SE."

Find out about the Duke’s Choice and Java Community Process Awards, the JavaOne DEMOgrounds, the JavaOne Codegarten and much more.
Link to it here.

Tuesday Sep 24, 2013

The Eleventh Annual Java Community Process Program Awards

by Timothy Beneke and Janice J. Heiss

In a festive room teeming with over 200 people, including many celebrated Java luminaries,
along with excellent food and drink, the 9th annual JCP Program Awards were handed out atop the majestic Hilton Hotel on Monday night. As the JCP states, “The Java Community Process (JCP) program celebrates success. Members of the community nominate worthy participants, Spec Leads, and Java Specification Requests (JSRs) in order to cheer on the hard work and creativity that produces ground-breaking results for the community and industry in the Java Standard Edition (SE), Java Enterprise Edition (EE), or Java Micro Edition (ME) platforms.”

The JCP added a new awards category this year for Adopt-a-JSR program participants, bringing the total to four: JCP Member/Participant of the Year, Outstanding Spec Lead, Most Significant JSR, and Outstanding Adopt-a-JSR Participant.

The room was full of good cheer, playful humor, a music band of Java developers, and enthusiastic appreciation of much that has been accomplished on behalf of Java technology in the previous year.

The nominees and winners in their respective categories were:

JCP Member/Participant of the Year

--Azul Systems, Gil Tene

--London Java Community (LJC), Ben Evans, Martijn Verburg, Richard Warburton, Graham Allan

--Mohamed Taman

The winner was Azul System’s Gil Tene. The JCP said, “Gil has worked diligently to provide clear advice on matters of Software Patents, IP and licensing that seeks to benefit both non-profits/individuals etc as well as organizations with vested commercial interests in Java. It's not easy delving into the depths of the legal aspects and the potential impacts of changes to the JCP, but with help from folks like Gil we're hopeful for a solid and fair outcome.”

Tene characterized his approach to the JCP as follows: “I represent Azul Systems on the JCP EC, but I try to apply an approach of ‘do the right thing first’ in my choices and positions. Coming from a small company that depends on Java and its ecosystem for its livelihood, I see my role as representing the interests of an entire sector of non-big-company commercial folks and of individual and professional developers out there, and providing some offset and balance to the normal mix of such boards.”

Outstanding Spec Lead

--Brian Goetz, Oracle

--Jitendra Kotamraju, Oracle

--Anatole Tresch, Credit Suisse

--Chris Vignola, IBM

The winner, Oracle’s Brian Goetz, was recognized, “For tirelessly working away at an incredibly complex JSR - JSR 335, Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language. From a community point of view, we've appreciated his willingness to listen and consider ideas from other technologists as well as spending time with groups of developers to understand the impact of Lambdas on Java.”

Goetz offered a statement in response to the award for his leadership in creating Lambda Expressions for the Java Language, which also won for most significant JSR. He said that lambdas, “represent a coordinated co-evolution of the Java SE platform, including the VM, language, and core libraries to provide developers with a powerful upgrade -- quite likely the largest ever -- to the Java SE programming model. We started this JSR in early 2010, but the topic of closures-in-Java had already been in play in the community for many years prior, and, of course, there was a broad diversity of opinions as to what direction, how far, and how fast to evolve the Java programming model. In the end, the most significant dimension of the challenge turned out to be: how do we integrate these new features in the language and libraries without them feeling grafted on after-the-fact. I think developers will find programming with this ‘new and improved Java’ to be a very pleasant experience -- I know I have.”

Most Significant JSR

--JSR 335, Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language

--JSR 344, JavaServer Faces (JSF) 2.2

--JSR 352, Batch Applications for the Java Platform

--JSR 354, Money and Currency API

--JSR 355, JCP Executive Committee Merge

The winner, as previously mentioned, was JSR 335, Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language, which the JCP praised as follows:

“This brings Java kicking and screaming into the modern programming language age and is seen as a catalyst for the second age of Java. It's underlying discoveries and improvements with regards to Type Inference has also resulted in a stronger JVM for all.”

Spec lead Brian Goetz, in picking up the award, remarked, “This is something we’ve been working on for three-and-a-half-years and it’s nice to be looking at it through the rear-view mirror.”

Outstanding Adopt-a-JSR Participant

--BeJUG, Johan Vos

--CeJUG, Helio Frota, Hildeberto Mendonça

--JUG Chennai, Rajmahendra (Raj) Hegde

--Morocco JUG and EGJUG, Mohamed Taman, Faissal Boutaounte

The winner was Morocco JUG and EGJUG, Mohamed Taman, and Faissal Boutaounte, who were praised, “For adopting JSR 339, JAX-RS 2.0 specification, along with many other JSRs. One JIRA issue filed by Morocco JUG on JSR 339 was classified as a ‘release-stopper’. A quick JIRA search using the ‘adoptajsr’ tag shows that most of the JIRA issues have been created by MoroccoJUG members. Several presentations and source code have been organized by these groups. Mohamed presented sessions about the upcoming technologies to widen the range of users in the future, especially Java EE 7 JSRs and spreading of community progress and contributions that make us encouraged to participate. Mohamed sent a clear message that Africa is here and is full of talented people who are willing to take it to the next level. Mohamed was responsible for translating an Arabic Adopt-s-JSR web page to allow more Arabs to participate.”

Taman said that, “Currently, I hold two positions, one as a Business Solutions Systems Architect and design supervisor and Java Team leader, at a big financial services company in Egypt, which affects all the country by building solutions affecting Egyptians every day, by providing more facilities for businesses and enhancing the economy… I am passionate about Java. I really love it and have fun coding, and love seeing it grow, day by day, as if it were my kid.”

The Annual Java Community Process Program Awards at  JavaOne is an event and party not to be missed!

The Java Community Process

Friday Jul 19, 2013

The 2013 Java Theme Community Challenge

Launching today!
Name the "Community Keynote" at JavaOne this year by submitting a crazy, fancy, funny, geeky slogan about what you LOVE about Java! Find 140 characters (not a coincidence) to describe your personal connection with the world's most pervasive programming language and share it with us.

The Challenge is open to individuals or organizations. 10 of the most outstanding submissions will be selected by a combined committee from SouJava, LJC and iJUG e.V. and Oracle. Those 10 enter a public community voting round at  java.net for 10 days. The winning entry will be announced on the website shortly thereafter. The winner will receive a full conference pass to 2013 JavaOne San Francisco.

More details in the Official Rules

The Duke's Choice Awards Nominations Close Monday

duke's choice awards 2013

The Duke's Choice Award program is open to all members of the Java community and nominations are accepted by anyone, including Oracle employees, for any compelling use of Java technology. The most important ingredient is innovation. Let's recognize and celebrate the innovation that Java delivers!

Winners will be notified at least one month prior to JavaOne in mid-August and announced in the September issue of Java Magazine and on stage at JavaOne in San Francisco. They will receive a free JavaOne full conference pass and a Duke Award Statue. It's easy, just submit nominations online.

Deadline for submission is Monday July 22th, 2013 5pm PST.

Monday May 06, 2013

Want to be in the Java Magazine?

Writing a Fix This code challenge is the easiest way to get published in Java Magazine. Give readers the chance to flex their brain muscles, have fun, and learn something new.

Java Magazine reaches more than 150,000 subscribers and is loaded with technical articles, community news, and success stories from an array of businesses. The magazine's success is the result of the expert writers who write about technologies that they have first hand experience with.

Pick a topic you are most familiar with and send as many code challenges as you want. The challenge can be about any Java technology, whether it is Java SE, Java EE, Java ME, or Java Embedded.

Submit a Fix This challenge today!  Just follow these simple steps:   

1. State the problem, including a short summary of the tool/technique, in about 75 words.

2. Send us the code snippet, with a short set-up so readers know what they are looking at (such as, "Consider the following piece of code to have database access within a Servlet.")

3. Provide four multiple-choice answers to the question, "What's the fix?"

4. Give us the answer, along with a brief explanation of why.

5. Tell us who you are (name, occupation, etc.)

6. Email the above to JAVAMAG_US at ORACLE.COM with "Fix This Submission" in the title.

Thursday Mar 21, 2013

Java Magazine March/April: Java Is Community

The March/April issue of Java Magazine is all about community. A thriving community is vital to Java technology and the Java language. We give you a hands-on guide to Java citizenship--from taking the first steps to participation to taking on leadership positions and launching events. Learn how to host a hackathon, become a Java Champion, revive your JUG, and much more!mag cover

For this issue, we took our tagline, "by and for the Java community," to heart. It features the first-ever guest editor: Agnes Crepet, Lyon JUG leader and Duchess leader. Agnes was a great resource and helped us put together this issue of Java Magazine. She suggested story ideas, wrote about reinvigorating your JUG, and gave guidance throughout the process. The way she enthusiastically agreed to be guest editor is just another great example of the Java community in action. Many other community members came together to make this issue a success, and we are grateful.

Also in the issue:

  • Java In Robotics — Meet Java pioneer Paul Perrone and some of his robots.
  • Using Java 8 Lambda Expressions — We continue our series on exploring lambda expressions.
  • Responsive Interportlet Communication with Ajax — Build portlets that communicate with each other and update dynically on the client.
  • JavaFX in Spring — Stephen Chin uses Spring to build out data screens in a JavaFX application.

Java Magazine is a FREE, bi-monthly, online publication. It includes technical articles on the Java language and platform; Java innovations and innovators; JUG and JCP news; Java events; links to online Java communities; and videos and multimedia demos. Subscriptions are free, registration required.

Do you have feedback about Java Magazine? Send a tweet to @oraclejavamag.

Friday Feb 22, 2013

Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7

Oracle’s Java evangelist and noted Java EE expert, Arun Gupta, presented a session at the annual IOUC (International Oracle User Community) Summit, held January 14–16, 2013, at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California, where more than 100 top user group leaders from around the world gathered to share best practices, provide feedback, and receive updates from leading Oracle developers.

Gupta’s talk, titled "The Java EE 7 Platform: Higher Productivity and Embracing HTML5," presented a glimpse into the rich possibilities that will be available in Java EE 7 upon its release in the spring of 2013. He covered several major developments, including:

* Java API for RESTful Web Services 2.0
* Java Message Service 2.0
* Java API for JSON Processing 1.0
* Java API for WebSocket 1.0
* Bean Validation 1.1
* Batch Applications for the Java Platform 1.0
* Java Persistence API 2.1
* Servlet 3.1
* Concurrency Utilities for Java EE 1.0
* JavaServer Faces 2.2

Gupta focuses on ways in which Java EE 7 offers higher productivity; less boilerplate; richer functionality; more default options; and HTML5 support in the form of WebSocket and JSON. He also observed that the cloud is in need of more standards. From the article:

"There are not enough standards in the cloud with W3C and other standards bodies. More standards are needed so that we can define a Java API for the cloud. Premature standardization can also be a problem if not enough innovation has taken place. So what is the right thing for the platform? We have reached out to the community, the core group members, and the executive committee of the Java Community Process and have focused on providing higher productivity and on embracing the HTML5 platform more closely. We are going to use dependency injection a lot more, which will give developers the ability to write less boilerplate code and offer richer functionality such as batch applications and caching. Similarly, for HTML5, we are embracing WebSocket functionality and the ability to parse and generate a JSON structure. We are providing support for HTML5-friendly markup as part of JSF.”

Gupta summarized the strengths of the various JSRs and closed by encouraging developers to participate in Adopt-a-JSR, a project that enables them to, “pursue their interest in particular Java EE 7 JSRs and download code, play with it, report bugs, and offer feedback to Java EE 7 specification leads.”

Check out the article here.

About

Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

duke
javeone logo
Links


Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
2
5
6
7
12
13
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today