Thursday Jan 19, 2012

A File I/O Tutorial Featuring NIO.2

A tutorial on the front page of otn/java titled “A File I/O Tutorial Featuring NIO.2” explains the new file I/O mechanism introduced in the Java 7 release. The java.nio.file package and its related package, java.nio.file.attribute, provide comprehensive support for file I/O and for accessing the default file system. Though the API has many classes, developers need only focus on a few key entry points. The tutorial makes it clear that the API is intuitive and easy to use.

The tutorial begins by asking, “What is a path?” and then introduces the Path class, which is the primary entry point for the package. It explains Methods in the Path class related to syntactic operations and moves on to the other primary class in the package, the Files class, which contains methods related to file operations. It then introduces some concepts common to many file operations and explains methods for checking, deleting, copying, and moving files.

The tutorial offers a concise summary of the API with suggestions for further learning.

“The java.nio.file package provides extensive support for file and file system I/O. This is a very comprehensive API, but the key entry points are as follows:
•    The Path class has methods for manipulating a path.
•    The Files class has methods for file operations, such as moving, copy, deleting, and also methods for retrieving and  setting file attributes.
•    The FileSystem class has a variety of methods for obtaining information about the file system.”

More information on NIO.2 can be found on the OpenJDK: NIO project website on java.net. This site includes resources for features provided by NIO.2 that are beyond the scope of this tutorial, such as multicasting, asynchronous I/O, and creating your own file system implementation.


Read the complete article here.

Wednesday Sep 07, 2011

Unit Testing for Java EE tech article on OTN

A new article, titled “Unit Testing for Java EE,” by Java Champion Adam Bien, is up on otn/java’s front page. Bien points out that too many developers believe that testing Java EE applications is too hard, inconvenient, or complex, something that has not been true since the advent of Java EE 5 more than five years ago.

Bien explains: “There is nothing special about unit testing Java EE 6 applications. You only have to add the JUnit library into your pom.xml file (see Listing 5) and put your classes into the src/test/java directory. All JUnit tests will be executed automatically during the standard Maven lifecycle: mvn clean install.”

He goes on to make use of “Mockito” an easy-to-use, open source mocking library. Bien writes:

“Mockito is able to create ‘smart proxies’ (a.k.a. mocks) from classes or interfaces. These proxies do not come with any behavior, but they are still perfectly usable. You can invoke methods, but will get the default values, or null, back. The behavior of the mocks can be recorded after their creation with when(mock.getAnswer()).then(42) syntax.

Mockito is perfectly suitable for ‘simulating’ any inconvenient classes, resources, or services. You can start with Mockito just by knowing a single class org.mockito.Mockito. The when-then ‘domain specific language’ is composed of static methods from the Mockito class. The org.mockito.Mockito class is well documented. In fact, the whole documentation set was generated from the JavaDoc markup in the org.mockito.Mockito class.”

Read the complete article here.

Wednesday Jul 20, 2011

Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0

A new article by Java Champion and JavaFX expert, Jim Weaver, titled “Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0,” shows developers how to animate their nodes in scenes the easy way, using the JavaFX 2.0 TranslateTransition class. JavaFX comes with its own transition classes, whose purpose is to provide convenient ways to do commonly used animation tasks. The article shows how to use the TranslateTransition class to animate a node, moving it back and forth between two positions in the UI.

From the article:

“JavaFX 2.0 comes with several transition classes (that extend the Transition class) whose purpose is to animate visual nodes in your application. JavaFX also contains many builder classes that provide the ability to express a user interface in a declarative-style. In addition, JavaFX has a powerful property binding capability in which properties may be bound to expressions to automatically keep them updated.”

Read the article here.

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