Wednesday May 18, 2016

Java Euro Tour

Bruno Souza, Edson Yanaga, and Otávio Santana are touring European JUGs talking about DevOps, big data, currency API, CDI 2 and cloud scalability. The team is also interviewing Java Champions, renowned Java speakers and community leaders in their homes and at work. Watch the replay of those interviews 

Some of the topics they present at JUGs: 
  • Containers and DevOps: full delivery cycle for Java applications  
  • Big Data and NoSQL with CDI and Cassandra 
  • First steps with the Money and Currency API, JSR 354 
  • Using CDI 2.0 in Java SE world - Contexts and Dependency Injection 2.0 (JSR-365) 
  • A Developer's Journey From Monoliths to Microservices 
  • Multi-cloud scalability: NoSQL with Cassandra, JavaEE, CDI and Containers. 
Java champions and community leaders interviewed include Andres Almiray, Ixchel Ruiz, Michael Hoffer, Wener Keil, Hendrik Ebbers, and Simon Ritter - to name a few. Watch the replay of all the interviews and follow the tour @brjavaman  

Wednesday Mar 30, 2016

Last Interactive Online Java Webinar with Q&A

The Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) delivers interactive Java technical content from Java Champions and Oracle experts to your desk.  

The interactive, online event, is sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). The April 5 event is the last one in this VTS series. It features six Java technical sessions about Java EE, cloud, and Java SE API. Register now

The Java Track includes three code-heavy sessions:

Java on Mobile: Thanks to innovations in mobile JVM's and the availability of JavaFX on iOS and Android, it is now possible to write applications once (in Java) and deploy them on the major mobile platforms. In this session, we will show how easy it is to create a highly-polished Material Design Java application, and to deploy it on an Android device and an iOS device with exactly the same code used in both deployments.

Asynchronous programming in Java 8: how to use CompletableFuture: This presentation aims to explain how the patterns introduced by this interface and its implementing class are new to the Java platform, and how they fill the gap in the old Future patterns.The different models are precisely presented: how to create complex asynchronous processing pipelines, how to deal with exceptions, how to test complex code. 

Down-to-Earth Microservices with Java EE: the session explores microservices using a simple but representative example using Java EE. You'll see how the Java EE programming model and APIs like JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2 and JTA aligns with the concept of microservices.

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers: Java SE 8 brings a bounty of improvements. In this session, you will learn about Lambda expressions, a new Date and Time API, the Streams API, Completable Futures, Nashorn, Repeatable Annotations, String joiners, etc.

Thinking Beyond ORM in JPA:  This session discusses native-query support in JPA along with stored procedures and result set mappings in JPA 2.1. The presented code samples illustrate the details of the API, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Our analysis reveals applicable use cases and most popular approaches. The summary provides guidelines on how and when to utilize native queries.

Visualizing Data in the Cloud with Oracle JET: Oracle JET is a free and open source toolkit, providing a solid basis for enterprise JavaScript applications, including built-in solutions for accessibility, modularity, and data visualization. In this code-driven session, you will learn everything you need to know to create maintainable enterprise applications in JavaScript!

Tuesday Feb 16, 2016

Down to Earth Microservices and Java EE!

Not sure whether microservices make sense for your project? Will a microservices architecture improve the performance and scalability of your project? In the Down to Earth Microservices with Java EE session, Reza Rahman looks beyond the buzz and gives you a concrete approach to microservices that will help you think about how to implement them.   

Reza will explain the ins-and-outs of microservices within the well-established context of SOA and takes a close look at when it makes sense to implement them. He will walk you through an example showing how to use the lightweight Java EE programming model with Java EE. The Java EE programming model and APIs are aligned with microservices. You’ll learn how APIs such as JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2, and JTA can help you build microservices. The microservices architecture style fits well within the Java EE framework and taps into Java knowledge that you currently have.  

This presentation is part of the next Virtual Technology Summit sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network. Register, it's free! For your convenience, we offer the event in three time zones as follows: 
  • Americas - March 8th- 9:30am to 1:00 PST - Register
  • APAC - March 15th - 9:30am to 1:00pm IST - Register
  • EMEA - April 5th - 9:30am to 1:00pm BST - Register
This VTS provides two tracks on Java SE and Java EE with six hands-on sessions. Check out the full VTS agenda here

Thursday Jan 07, 2016

New Java Champion José Paumard

Congratulations to the new Java Champion: José Paumard!

José is an assistant professor at the Institut Galilée (Université Paris 13), PhD in applied mathematics from the ENS de Cachan. He has also worked as one of the lead members of the Paris JUG for 6 years, and is a co-founder of Devoxx France.

As a member of the CDI 2.0 Expert Group, he has contributed new ways of handling events, especially in the asynchronous part of the spec. He provided new patterns that have been adopted by the EG. 

José has been working as an independent programmer for 20 years and is a well-known Java / Java EE / software craftsmanship expert and trainer. His expertise includes Tomcat, JBoss, Weblogic, Websphere, Glassfish, and the most popular Java EE parts: JPA (Hibernate & Eclipselink), EJB (including version 2), JMS, JTA, the Web tier, and more.  

José speaks at conferences, including JavaOne and Devoxx; and writes technical articles for various publications including Java Magazine and Oracle Technology Network. Passionate about education, he publishes MOOC for several companies: Oracle Virtual Technology Summit, Pluralsight, Microsoft Virtual Academy and Voxxed.

His blog: blog.paumard.org/en/ Follow him @josepaumard

Java champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technologists and community leaders who are community-nominated. Learn more about Java Champions

Thursday Oct 01, 2015

New Oracle University Java Courses!

The Java EE 7: Back-End Server Application Development training was recently added to Oracle University. The course teaches you how to build and deploy enterprise applications that comply with Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 7 Full Profile. You will learn to develop applications with the following technologies: Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB), Java Persistence API (JPA), JDBC, Java Transaction API (JTA), Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI), Java Message Service (JMS), Bean Validation, Batch API, Timer services, Java EE Concurrency and more. This new class is available online

Java University at JavaOne offers deep dive training about the popular Java technology. The sessions include: 
  • Architect and Design Secure Robust Enterprise Java
  •  Applications for the Cloud and Beyond
  • Creating Engaging Games with Java FX 8: A Case Study
  • JavaScript for Java Developers: Develop Web Applications
  • Recommended Practices for Java Performance Tuning
  • Stay Current with Java SE 8: Java Oracle Certified Professional Exam Cram
  • The Latest and the Greatest of RESTful Web Services
  • Using the Power of JSF 2.X, HTML5, WebSocket, and JSON
  • Using the Power of Java 8 Lambda Expressions and Streams
Receive a free 30-day Oracle Learning Streams subscription trial when you attend the Oracle University Preconference Training event. Terms and Conditions apply.

Learn more by visiting the Oracle University and Java University pages and add a session to your conference pass today!

Monday Jan 26, 2015

Antoine Sabot-Durand Discusses CDI 2.0

Antoine Sabot-Durand, Co-Spec Lead for CDI, discusses CDI 2.0. It is slated to be a part of Java EE 8. Find out how you can learn the details about CDI 2.0 and how you can get involved. Learn more on the Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java page on Java.net.

We're always adding more videos to the YouTube/Java channel.  

Tuesday Sep 09, 2014

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 Released!

Thursday Sep 26, 2013

Session Report: 50 New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 minutes

 by Timothy Beneke

On Tuesday afternoon, noted Java EE authors Arun Gupta and Antonio Goncalves offered a whirlwind tour of new features in “Java EE 7: Fifty New Features of Java EE 7 in 50 Minutes”. Gupta is legendary at Oracle for his hard work and astute grasp of the Java EE platform. His blog offers a wealth of insight into Java EE and other Java matters. He is the author, most recently, of Java EE 7 Essentials published by O’Reilly. Goncalves is one of the most highly regarded writers on EE anywhere and the author of Beginning Java EE 7, published by Apress.

Java EE 7’s new features enhance HTML5 support, increase developer productivity, and further improve how enterprise demands can be met. Developers will write significantly less boilerplate code, have better support for the latest Web applications, and gain access to enhanced scalability and richer, simpler functionality. The session did a stellar job of spelling out the details to a packed house.

With four new components (WebSocket, JSON-P, batch, and concurrency), and three old ones significantly updated (JAX-RS, JMS, and EL), along with other significant changes to the platform, a lot of new functionality has been added.

They divided the new Java EE 7 features into 19 categories and explained an average of two to three features in each category.  Here were the categories:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346)
Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349)
Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318)
Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236)
JPA 2.1 (JSR 338)
JTA 1.2 (JSR 907)
EJB 3.2 (JSR 345)
JMS 2.0 (JSR 343)
Servlet 3.1 (JSR 340)
Web Socket 1.0 (JSR 356)
Expression Language 3.0 (JSR 341)
JSF 2.2 (JSR 344)
JAX-RS 2.0 (JSR 339)
JSON-P 1.0 (JSR 353)
Batch 1.0 (JSR 352)
JavaMail 1.5 (JSR 919)
JCA 1.7 (JSR 322)
Java Connector Architecture
Default Resources

Here are just a few of the high points:

CDI 1.1 (JSR 346) enables finer scanning control and the ability to veto the processing of a class or package. Bean Validation 1.1 (JSR 349) allows for method validation and the ability to pre/post conditions on method and constructors. Interceptors 1.2 (JSR 318) focused on the ability to associate an Interceptor associated with a constructor and the ability to prioritize interceptor bindings.

For Concurrency utilities 1.0 (JSR 236), the emphasis was on ManagedExecutor with a focus on:
* User threads in Java EE applications
* The ability to support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* And to extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)

Further emphasis in concurrency was on ManagedThreadFactory and DynamicProxy.

Dynamic Proxy:
* Creates dynamic proxy objects, and adds contextual information available for applications running in Java EE environment
* It supports Classloading, JNDI, Security, …

Also covered as part of concurrency: ManagedExecutor
* User threads in Java EE applications
* Support simple and advance concurrency design patterns
* Extend Concurrency Utilities API from Java SE (JSR 166y)
– java.util.concurrent package

In addition: ManagedScheduledExecutor
* Managed version of ScheduledExecutorService
* Submit delayed or periodic tasks

For JPA 2.1 (JSR 338), standardized database schema generation and the ability to define additional indexes in schema generation were emphasized. JTA 1.2 (JSR 907) was praised for its capacity for transaction management on Managed Beans as a CDI interceptor binding; in addition, it offers CDI scope whose lifecycle is scoped to the currently active JTA transaction.

They discussed WebSocket and annotated server endpoint which enables full-duplex bi-directional communication over a single TCP connection.

JSON Builder creates an object model (or an array) in memory by adding elements. JsonParser is an event-based parser that can read JSON data from a stream.

All in all, it was an impressive display of Java SE 7 expertise.

Java EE 7 Essentials by Arun Gupta

Beginning Java EE 7 by Antonio Goncalves

Be sure to check out Parleys.com in early October to listen to the entire session. It's well worth it.

Wednesday Sep 25, 2013

Session Report: Demystifying Java EE

Adam Bien, who is not only a Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star, but was named in 2010 as Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year, spoke to an enthusiastic crowd where he addressed some core issues about Java EE. He encouraged questions – “The more heretical or offensive the better.” It was obvious that Bien loves to think about and code in Java. He remarked, “The more I code the happier I am”. Spoken like a hard-core Java developer!

First, he asked, “What is Java EE? Innovation vs. Standardization”?  For Bien, Java EE is nothing but a release of co-existing APIs. Before Java EE, there was a mess with lots of application servers, with absolutely no chance of finding two application servers with similar APIs. Java EE resulted in a huge simplification. Now with Java EE 7 a wealth of are applications available. Java EE, insisted Bien, was never about innovation because building a standard precludes innovation. “Java EE will always lag behind,” he observed. “For instance, Hibernate will always have more features than JPA. Spring will always have more features than CDI. Java EE is the 80% that makes products work. It was never about innovation.”

He boiled down the whole point of Java EE: “What matters are small WARs – the smaller the WAR, the faster the build and deployment. The faster the build and deployment, the more productive you become,” he insisted. He explained that Java EE enables you to not put everything into the WAR and place as much as possible on the application server and less on the WAR. He explained that most of his WARs in Java EE 6 or Java EE 7 projects are very small

Bien asked, “Are EJBs bloated?” He explained that the question implies some voodoo stuff behind the scenes making EJBs bloated. He offered a means to answer this question.

He went on to answer a wealth of questions in a way that was thoughtful, incisive, witty and, at times, a bit provocative.

Here's some of the topics/issues (pulled directly from his slides) that Adam touched on in this fast-paced session:

*Do we need transactions?
*Is Dependency Injection Black Magic, VooDoo, or both?
*Is EJB pooling needed? Are EJBs bloated? What happens, if you violate the EJB programming restrictions?
*Why AOP didn't take off in Java EE?
*Stateless vs. Stateful programming model?
*HA without a Cluster?
*Are there any POJOs out there? What happens during deployment?
*Is Java EE faster than J2EE? Does JMS 2.0 scale and perform well? Is Java EE only suitable for the "big" enterprise?
*Is JSF the silver bullet? What is the deal with CORBA and RMI?
*How to unit test Java EE applications? Why we don't build a best of breed server from scratch?

This was a lively, entertaining and information-packed session. Just what you would expect from a pro developer as Adam Bien. I highly recommend viewing this session.

Adam Bien’s Blog
Check out Parleys.com where you can listen to the session in early October.

Tuesday Sep 24, 2013

Session Report: JSR 341: Expression Language 3.0

Ed Burns, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, and Kinman Chung, Principle Member of Technical Staff, both at Oracle, presented a session on Monday in which they described new features in JSR 341, Expression Language (EL) 3.0. They discussed the APIs for the use of EL in standalone environments and EL syntax for new operators, plus lambda expressions, and support for collection objects, all the while offering copious code illustrations.

Burns remarked that he was pleased that Java Champion and JavaOne Rock Star Adam Bien had referred to EL 3.0 as “the hidden gem of Java EE”. “I don’t know how hidden it is,” said Burns, “but I think it’s a gem.”

He discussed the origins of EL, which has a long and active history in the Java platform. EL began in 2004 as part of the Java Standard Tag Library (JSTL 1.0), moved to JSP 2.0 in 2006, and became an independent specification with JSR 341 in 2011. It is used in JSF, CDI, and Avatar. Now, 9 years after its inception, it is an independent specification that is heavily used in JSF.   

Burns observed that the presence of EL is the key differentiator between Java server and non-java server stacks. “Java server-based web frameworks are likely to use EL,” said Burns. “When you show someone who is not familiar with EL how easy it is to move things together from disparate parts of your application, it’s very compelling.”

The most important feature that EL 3 brings is lambda expressions – developers do not have to wait until Java SE 8 is released. It all runs on Java EE 7, which requires Java SE 7 -- which means that it is currently available. Burns gave a brief discussion of lambda expressions, which basically behave like an anonymous function -- lambdas in EL are EL expressions. They offer full access to the EL environment within the body of the EL lambda expression, something not available from Java SE lambdas. “You won’t be able to refer to other EL things from a plain old SE lambda expression,” said Burns.

The goal of EL 3 is to provide greater expressive power for applications and to use it outside of Java EE. Burns and Chung provided an overview of collection operations and explained EL’s support for stand-alone environments. EL 3 is easy to use outside of Java EE and provides standard data structures: ELContext; ELResolvers; and local variable and function repositories.

They explained that it enables direct EL operations and has: EL expression evaluation; Bean definition; and Function definition. They emphasized that other key parts of Java EE can also be used standalone, such as: Bean Validation; Persistence (JPA); and Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI). They encouraged developers to consider the possibilities for cloud deployment in: Defining functions and variables and defining beans.

They spent the rest of the session illustrating their key points with a healthy dose of code.

Links and Downloads:
* JSR 341: http://www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=341
    Download spec and API javadocs

* Project home: https://java.net/projects/el-spec/
   Report spec bugs or RFE for el.next

* RI: https://java.net/projects/uel/
   Maven artifacts available from Maven Central
   Download source and report RI bugs

* Integrated in Glassfish 4.0: https://glassfish.java.net/

You can listen to this session in early October on Parleys.com.

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