Wednesday Sep 26, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Adam Bien

Among the most celebrated developers in recent years, especially in the domain of Java EE and JavaFX, is consultant Adam Bien, who, in addition to being a JavaOne Rock Star for Java EE sessions given in 2009 and 2011, is a Java Champion, the winner of Oracle Magazine’s 2011 Top Java Developer of the Year Award, and recently won a 2012 JAX Innovation Award as a top Java Ambassador.

Bien will be presenting the following sessions:

  • TUT3907 - Java EE 6/7: The Lean Parts
  • CON3906 - Stress-Testing Java EE 6 Applications Without Stress
  • CON3908 - Building Serious JavaFX 2 Applications
  • CON3896 - Interactive Onstage Java EE Overengineering

I spoke with Bien to get his take on Java today. He expressed excitement that the smallest companies and startups are showing increasing interest in Java EE. “This is a very good sign,” said Bien. “Only a few years ago J2EE was mostly used by larger companies -- now it becomes interesting even for one-person shows. Enterprise Java events are also extremely popular. On the Java SE side, I'm really excited about Project Nashorn.”

Nashorn is an upcoming JavaScript engine, developed fully in Java by Oracle, and based on the Da Vinci Machine (JSR 292) which is expected to be available for Java 8.  

Bien expressed concern about a common misconception regarding Java's mediocre productivity. “The problem is not Java,” explained Bien, “but rather systems built with ancient patterns and approaches. Sometimes it really is ‘Cargo Cult Programming.’ Java SE/EE can be incredibly productive and lean without the unnecessary and hard-to-maintain bloat. The real problems are ‘Ivory Towers’ and not Java’s lack of productivity.”

Bien remarked that if there is one thing he wanted Java developers to understand it is that, "Premature optimization is the root of all evil. Or at least of some evil. Modern JVMs and application servers are hard to optimize upfront. It is far easier to write simple code and measure the results continuously. Identify the hotspots first, then optimize.”

He advised Java EE developers to, “Rethink everything you know about Enterprise Java. Before you implement anything, ask the question: ‘Why?’ If there is no clear answer -- just don't do it. Most well known best practices are outdated. Focus your efforts on the domain problem and not the technology.”

Looking ahead, Bien said, “I would like to see open source application servers running directly on a hypervisor. Packaging the whole runtime in a single file would significantly simplify the deployment and operations.”

Check out a recent Java Magazine interview with Bien about his Java EE 6 stress monitoring tool here.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.



Wednesday Jun 13, 2012

Duke's Choice Award Nominations Close Friday!

The Duke's Choice Awards celebrate extreme innovation in the world of Java technology. Nominate an individual, a group or company who show the best in Java innovation. Nominate at www.Java.net/dukeschoice. Nominations are open until this Friday, June 15! Nominate using an easy online form.

What can winning a Duke's Choice Award do for you? Let's find out. Last year, Trish Gee, senior developer, and the LMAX Exchange team won a Duke's Choice Award for the LMAX Disruptor. An innovative, multi-threaded, open-source concurrent programming framework, the LMAX Disruptor is designed for high-performance and low-latency transaction processing. LMAX Exchange wants to build the fastest trading platform in the world. We asked her about the impact of winning a Duke's Choice award.

Oracle Technology Network: What was it like to win a Duke's Choice Award?

Gee: It was a big surprise and a really exciting thing to win the Duke's Choice Award! I submitted our nomination thinking that we were doing something interesting in the Java ecosystem, but I expected that we were a bit niche, and a bit too unknown, to win. It was really cool to win, and even more amazing when Oracle folks I spoke to had actually heard of the Disruptor and understood what it was about. In particularly I really enjoyed the awards ceremony at JavaOne and the chance to meet the other award winners. I've met a few of them since at other conferences so it was great to have that in common and to have been introduced in the past.

Oracle Technology Network: What benefits have you gotten from being a "Duke's Choice Award Winner?"

Gee: Other than putting the "Duke's Choice Winner" logo on all our conference slides?? Personally I think it makes people pay attention a little more - at the start of this year there were still lots of people who had never heard of the Disruptor or of LMAX, but when they see an award like that, some of them sit up and start to listen - it's not just any old open source project that's there to sell something.

The biggest benefit that open sourcing the Disruptor has given LMAX is in the recruitment area - since December we've nearly doubled the number of developers in the team. Previously we always found it hard to attract and retain the right sort of talent - London is a great city to be a Java developer in - and since we started talking about the Disruptor we've found good developers seeking us, and other developers we've approached being open to working for our company. Winning the Duke's Choice Award has definitely been a part of this, it lends credibility to what we've done and given us visibility on a global scale.

Oracle Technology Network: How is LMAX project doing today?

Gee: LMAX is doing better than ever - we're smashing the financial targets we've set for ourselves, we have more users than ever, and as I said we're in the process of growing the technology team so we can scale up to the demands from our users and from our business. We're in an interesting stage at the moment, we're getting big enough and successful enough to be growing out of start-up mode, and we've got some interesting challenges as we scale the company, the teams, and the platform.

Oracle Technology Network: What are you up to these days?

Gee: I'm still at LMAX, still coding away as a Real Life Developer. As well as that, JavaOne gave me the push I needed to start presenting at these conferences, so I've presented at a number of international conferences and obviously quite a few London-based ones, mostly talking about the Disruptor. I'll be at JavaOne again this year presenting my "User's Guide to the Disruptor", and I'm on a panel for the London Java Community's presentation on the JCP. The LJC and associated JCP work keeps me nearly as busy as LMAX, so much so that one thing I've not been doing as much of this year is the blogging that got me to this position in the first place. Oh, and I wrote that Disruptor article for Java Magazine!

Read more about Trish in the "Heroes of Java" series by . Her Twitter handle is @Trisha_Gee. Now go nominate someone for the Duke's Choice Awards!

Thursday May 24, 2012

Judges Selected for Duke's Choice Awards

The 2012 Duke's Choice Awards judges have been selected (or coerced), and it is an impressive list of community members:

  • Yara Senger, SouJava
  • John Yeary, Greenville Java Users Group
  • Glen Peterson, JUG member and CTO PlanBase, Inc.
  • Martijn Verburg, London City JUG
  • Justin Kestelyn, OTN
  • Michelle Kovac, Java Marketing & Operations
  • Arun Gupta, Java Evangelist & Glassfish community member
  • Sharat Chander, Java Evangelist team manager

In addition to the nine winners selected by the judging panel, a Community Choice winner will be selected via the java.net polling tool. The Community Choice vote will go live July 1st at java.net.

 A 10-year old tradition in the Java community, the Duke's Choice Awards awards are granted to the best and most innovative projects using Java. The primary judging criteria for this prestigious award is innovation, putting small developer shops on an equal footing with multinational giants. The ten most innovative submissions will be announced in the September/October issue of Java Magazine and showcased at Java One in San Francisco.

The Duke's Choice Awards celebrate extreme innovation in the world of Java technology. Nominate an individual, a group or company who show the best in Java innovation. There are no predetermined categories--it's all about innovation. Nominate via the easy online form at www.Java.net/dukeschoice. Nominations are open until June 15, 2012.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

And The Winners Are.......The Duke's Choice Award

On Sunday evening, Oct. 2, at the JavaOne Open House, Oracle welcomed and celebrated the 2011 Duke's Choice Award winners, all talented developers who have demonstrated extreme innovation in the creation of Java-powered applications.

Drum roll: And the winners are...

Arquillian Project - Arquillian is a platform for simplifying Java integration testing.  We transparently handle the pesky scaffolding like server startup, framework initialization and deployment - leaving you to focus on the task at hand: writing your test logic.

• dooApp - Infiltrea is an end-to-end solution, built with JavaFX and Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE), designed for green building professionals whose job is to measure the air tightness of buildings.

Inductive Automation - Ignition is a Java-based web application that includes a business scorecard to integrate different manufacturing machines using a central web-server. It creates systems that cover the full spectrum between Human Machine Interface (HMI), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) and Manufacturing Execution System (MES), enabling rapid project development and deployment.

• Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) jHome - A complete home automation API open-source for Glassfish/Java EE, enabling developers to control anything in their homes such as lamps, LED lights, and coffee machines.

• JFrog - JFrog's Artifactory is the world's first binary repository manager. Built with the Content Repository API for Java (JCR) specification, it is helping to change the way developers build and manage software modules by delivering high concurrency and unmatched data integrity.

JRebel - JRebel is a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) plug-in that enables Java developers to instantly see any code change made to an application. It allows developers to skip the build and redeploy phases and has prevented 39 million redeploys.

• LMAX - The LMAX Disruptor is a multi-threaded, open-source concurrent programming framework designed for high-performance and low-latency transaction processing. Part of LMAX's Java-based trading platform, the LMAX Disruptor replaces and outperforms java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue by up to 80 times.

Rockwell Automation - Rockwell Automation is creating its next generation, Java-enabled HMI device line of products that will allow for the automated communication and exchange of data to factory floor lines.

Sodbeans Project - The Sodbeans Project is an open-source, NetBeans-based module suite designed to enhance accessibility for the blind in modern programming environments. The NetBeans module suite includes a new programming language designed for ease-of-use, a text-to-speech engine designed to make NetBeans compatible with screen readers on multiple platforms and a number of features designed to make programming easier for the blind.

The Netty Project - The Netty Project is a Java-based new I/O (NIO) client server framework that enables quick and easy development of network applications. It greatly simplifies and streamlines network programming such as TCP and UDP socket server.

Congratulations to all!

Tuesday Oct 04, 2011

And The Winners Are.......The Duke's Choice Award

On Sunday evening, Oct. 2, at the JavaOne Open House, Oracle welcomed and celebrated the 2011 Duke's Choice Award winners, all talented developers who have demonstrated extreme innovation in the creation of Java-powered applications.

Drum roll: And the winners are...

Arquillian Project - The Arquillian project simplifies integration testing for Java-based applications. It provides an easy mechanism for developers to test application code inside a remote or embedded container, or by interacting as a client of the container.

• dooApp - Infiltrea is an end-to-end solution, built with JavaFX and Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE), designed for green building professionals whose job is to measure the air tightness of buildings.

Inductive Automation - Ignition is a Java-based web application that includes a business scorecard to integrate different manufacturing machines using a central web-server. It creates systems that cover the full spectrum between Human Machine Interface (HMI), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) and Manufacturing Execution System (MES), enabling rapid project development and deployment.

• Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) jHome - A complete home automation API open-source for Glassfish/Java EE, enabling developers to control anything in their homes such as lamps, LED lights, and coffee machines.

• JFrog - JFrog's Artifactory is the world's first binary repository manager. Built with the Content Repository API for Java (JCR) specification, it is helping to change the way developers build and manage software modules by delivering high concurrency and unmatched data integrity.

JRebel - JRebel is a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) plug-in that enables Java developers to instantly see any code change made to an application. It allows developers to skip the build and redeploy phases and has prevented 39 million redeploys.

• LMAX - The LMAX Disruptor is a multi-threaded, open-source concurrent programming framework designed for high-performance and low-latency transaction processing. Part of LMAX's Java-based trading platform, the LMAX Disruptor replaces and outperforms java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue by up to 80 times.

Rockwell Automation - Rockwell Automation is creating its next generation, Java-enabled HMI device line of products that will allow for the automated communication and exchange of data to factory floor lines.

Sodbeans Project - The Sodbeans Project is an open-source, NetBeans-based module suite designed to enhance accessibility for the blind in modern programming environments. The NetBeans module suite includes a new programming language designed for ease-of-use, a text-to-speech engine designed to make NetBeans compatible with screen readers on multiple platforms and a number of features designed to make programming easier for the blind.

The Netty Project - The Netty Project is a Java-based new I/O (NIO) client server framework that enables quick and easy development of network applications. It greatly simplifies and streamlines network programming such as TCP and UDP socket server.

Congratulations to all!
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