Tuesday Apr 15, 2014

Internet of Things Workshop for Kids

Devoxx4Kids is offering workshops for kids 6th grade and older to learn the basics of the Internet of Things in Mountain View, California on Sunday, May 4th. Register your child now for the morning or afternoon session!

These workshops will cover the basic concepts applied for interfacing the real world to the digital world, like sensors and controllers, circuits, voltage, current, analog and digital signals. Kids will learn via hands-on activities using the Arduino Uno, an open-source micro-controller. It can control simple components like switches, LEDs, and light sensors. Arduino kits will be provided for hands-on experience in a shared setting. 

The Internet of Things is growing each day. Objects from everyday life, like water heaters, energy meters, and weather stations are now connecting to each other and people, computers and the Internet. Now is the time for your child to learn about this exciting area!

Internet of Things for Kids

Sunday, May 4, 2014
9:00 AM to 12:00 PM or 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

Hackerdojo, Mountain View, CA 

Price: $10.00/per person

REGISTRATION REQUIRED, no on-site registration. 

Note: Please download and install the software as described prior to the workshop.

Devoxx4Kids is focused on educating parents to teach their kids and show that it is possible to be creative with computers. The goal is to introduce parents and their kids to programming, robotics and engineering in a fun way. This is achieved by organizing sessions where attendees can develop computer games, program robots and also have an introduction to electronics. 

Thursday Mar 27, 2014

Create Apps with the Gemalto Concept Board

"The Gemalto concept board has 2G and 3G support, so you can send text messages, place a call, write Java Midlets and Arduino shields support" explains Vinicius Senger.

In this video, he presents step-by-step tutorials on how to configure the Gemalto boards and to create a project controlling LED lights. You can download this project as well as the fan caller demo here. Visit the IoT Developer Challenge website for more training videos. Once you have a working project, submit a video and the code of your project for a chance to win a JavaOne trip! 

In the video below, Vinicius explains how to create a fan caller 


Thursday Nov 21, 2013

Coding at Internet of Things (IoT) Hack Fest

Devoxx IoT Hack Fest offered the chance for attendees to code with Java Embedded for multiple devices. Attendees built embedded applications using devices and sensors in just a couple of days. A pre-configured panel, created by Globalcode founder Vinicius Senger, a long-time Java embedded developer and trainer, connects Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Beaglebone black, and Gemalto boards to a series of sensors such as distance, motion, alcohol and temperature sensors, as well as relays and camera. Those components are accessible remotely via a web server and REST calls. A new addition to IoT Hack Fest at Devoxx was the Leap Motion. ZeroTurnaround senior developer Geert Bevin lent nine Leap Motion controllers, gave a training session and was the onsite mentor for the Leap Motion.  

During two days, attendees learned and hacked the panel and the Leap Motion. For example, Hartmut Lang hacked a sensor distance and the blink(1) component with Java Embedded Suite, Jersey API. He turned on a ThingM blink(1) multi-colored USB light via the proximity sensor on the Java Embedded Panel. The proximity data is accessible through a Java sever running on a Raspberry PI with an Arduino bridge. REST calls give access to the current sensor data. This was then translated to Java calls that control the intensity of the blink(1) light. Everything was programmed in Netbeans and was running on a dedicated Raspberry PI.

A number of projects were about controlling the relays using Java SE Embedded, Pi4J and JavaFX. They connected their applications to the panel with the Raspberry Pi's and relays. Others worked with JavaFX and Raspberry Pi. They created a distance measurement using Fuzzy Logic, Arduino, Java Embedded Suite, RXTX, Things API and JavaFX to control lights. Thomas Kriechbaum worked with Java SE Embedded, Apache Camel, MQTT for Android, MQTT with Camel and Mosquito to control actuators and reading sensors. Geert Van Landeghem built an animation framework for LCD displays using Java SE Embedded, Pi4J/I2C and LCDPlate Adafruit

Senior software architect Claude Falguière created an interactive game to teach kids the principle of programmed operations. This is done by leading a robot through a maze. Changing the directions of the robot is done via hand gestures with the leap Motion controller. Each direction change is recorded as a card and shown as the list of operations. These can be manipulated and started again.

An ant-chasing game, written in Scratch used the Leap Motion plugin with a Java application for the gesture-interpreting gateway. Players moved their fingers around in the air and an ant chased its movements. 

Geert Bevin created an application controlling multi-colored led strip with hand gestures. The Leap Motion controller detects hand position in 3D-space and sends the X/Y/Z data straight to the led strip to control the intensity of the red/green/blue lights. The led strip was connected to a Raspberry PI with an Arduino bridge and could be piloted through REST calls running on an embedded Java server. In this video, Geert explains the project.  

More projects online at the IoT Community on Java.net

Monday Oct 17, 2011

Getting Started with Embedded Java -- Sense, Control, Connect, Store, Sync

At JavaOne 2011, Terrence Barr, Senior Technologist, Mobile & Embedded, Oracle Germany, presided over a two-hour HOL (Hands-On-Lab) on Monday in which he taught developers how to build an embedded Java solution that senses and controls the environment, stores data, and connects to back-end databases for synchronization and further processing. The session offered considerable detail along with step-by-step exercises as participants learned how to create the embedded EnviroTracker system and application which tracks and processes environmental data. The application interfaces with a microcontroller to read sensor input (ambient light brightness), to control output (and LED), and then further processes the sensor data.

The lab focused on:
• The benefits of Java technology in the embedded space
• The components of embedded Java platforms
• Setting up an embedded Java platform
• Interfacing between the embedded Java platform, the microcontroller, and I/O
• Accessing and controlling I/O from Java
• Processing sensor data

Barr took developers through seven basic tasks or exercises:

1. Create the EnviroTracker
2. Install the OJEC (Oracle Java ME Embedded Client) on the Development Host
The Oracle Java Micro Edition Embedded Client (OJEC) implements the CDC Platform configuration.
3. Develop and Test Your First Embedded Java Application..
4. Install OJEC on the Target Platform and Run Your Java Application
5: Understand I/O and the Arduino Microcontroller
6: EnviroTracker V1: First Contact
7: EnviroTracker V2: Continuous Monitoring and Processing

By the end of a rigorous and demanding, but satisfying two hours, attendees had built a real-world embedded system and created the EnviroTracker Application to track environmental sensor data. They learned how to install and use embedded Java runtimes and tools, and how to interface with I/O devices and microcontrollers from Java applications.

The take home message: Creating sophisticated embedded Java systems and applications is easy due to the platform independence of the Java language and runtime, the scalability of pre-existing Java skills to embedded development, and the comprehensive support provided by mature and feature-rich developer tools.

For more info, go to Terrence Barr's blog.

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