Tuesday Mar 29, 2016

Moving to Garbage First

Garbage First (G1) is likely to become the default collector in Java 9. In this presentation, Kirk Pepperdine shows different case studies on how to use the G1 with your applications. He also demonstrates tips and tricks to work around some of the hiccups. 


In this interview, Kirk Pepperdine shows his Censum performance diagnostics tool from jClarity and describes the state of G1 GC 


Waste Management in JDK 9

“Instead of a simple garbage collector to free up memory, Garbage First (G1) takes the role of a waste management consultant: freeing unused memory and identifying ways to reduce the overall amount of garbage.” explains Eric Costlow in a new blog

Costlow demonstrates how string Deduplication can significantly decrease heap usage. Using the Eclipse IDE, he runs a performance test using Java Flight Recorder to benchmark the results.

Monday Mar 28, 2016

Module System in JDK 9

From original blog post by Mark Reinhold 

The module system (JSR 376 and JEP 261), was integrated into JDK 9 last week and is now available for testing in early-access build 111.

Project Jigsaw is an enormous effort, encompassing six JEPs implemented by dozens of engineers over many years. So far we’ve defined a modular structure for the JDK (JEP 200), reorganized the source code according to that structure (JEP 201), and restructured the JDK and JRE run-time images to support modules (JEP 220).

Like the previous major change, the introduction of modular run-time images, the introduction of the module system might impact you even if you don’t make direct use of it. That’s because the module system is now fully operative at both compile time and run time, at least for the modules comprising the JDK itself. Most of the JDK’s internal APIs are, as a consequence, fully encapsulated and hence, by default, inaccessible to code outside of the JDK.

An existing application that uses only standard Java SE APIs and runs on JDK 8 should just work, as they say, on JDK 9. If, however, your application uses a JDK-internal API, or uses a library or framework that does so, then it’s likely to fail. In many cases you can work around this via the -XaddExports option of the javac and java commands. If, e.g., your application uses the internal sun.security.x509.X500Name class then you can enable access to it via the option

-XaddExports:java.base/sun.security.x509=ALL-UNNAMED 

This causes all members of the sun.security.x509 package in the java.base module to be exported to the special unnamed module in which classes from the class path are defined.

Read more

Tuesday Jan 20, 2015

Creative and Fun Hunting at Devoxx

Get the full development story of the Hunt Game with those two interviews. The hunt was about tracking beacons at the Devoxx venue and throughout Antwerp for points. Peters and Seghers share details about the phone application design, user experience, and beacon placements.

Hear from Johan Vos and Peter Kuterna about the programming challenge between the front-end designed by Peter and the back-end Johan built with Java EE 7, Glassfish 4.1 and Java 8 APIs.

Monday Dec 08, 2014

OTN Virtual Technology Summit - Replay

The Oracle Technology Network (OTN) is excited to invite you to watch the Virtual Technology Summit on demand. VTS is a great way to keep up with Java. Learn from Java Champions and Oracle experts as they share their insight and expertise.

In this second edition, you will get code-laden training on how to:


  • Implement solutions using the latest Java EE features
  • Use lambdas and the new streams library API
  • Tune your Java applications for high performance

Watch the sessions now! Register with your email to access all the content for free. 

Tuesday Sep 09, 2014

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 Released!

Thursday Aug 28, 2014

Java and Security at JavaOne

In a Java Magazine interview, Jim Manico (pictured on the right) describes his JavaOne session on security. "I will be speaking about the top coding techniques and essential tools, including several Oracle Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), Apache, and Google open source Java projects that will help developers build low-risk, high security applications". Jim is an author and educator of developer security-awareness training. You can find more details of his session in JavaOne content catalog

His session is part of a dedicated track about Java and Security, which addresses topics ranging from security tools and coding techniques to innovative products, and includes participation from recognized security leaders discussing policies and best practices. While the value of offensive security techniques is recognized, the focus of this track is primarily on defensive measures. 

Check out all the topics in the Java and Security track 

Thursday Oct 03, 2013

Hands on with Oracle Java Cloud Service in Java Magazine

The latest issue of Java Magazine, which takes as its theme “Seize the Cloud,” has an article by IndicThreads founder Harshad Oak, titled “Hands on with Oracle Java Cloud Service, Part One,” that provides an introduction to Oracle’s platform-as-a-service (PaaS) Java offerings. PaaS is about renting a software platform and running a custom business application on it, thus enabling developers to focus on the business application and not have to worry about the hardware or core software platform, according to Oak.

Oak points out that, “Java EE has been the primary software platform for enterprise and server-side development for more than a decade, and it is increasingly the platform of choice even on the cloud.”

He explains that Oracle’s cloud push began in 2011, and has subsequently launched several cloud solutions that support more than 25 million cloud users worldwide. “Oracle Java Cloud Service and Oracle Database Cloud Service have been Oracle’s most visible PaaS solutions so far,” comments Oak. “Oracle’s other PaaS offerings are Oracle  Developer Cloud Service, Oracle Storage Cloud Service, and Oracle Messaging Cloud Service. Oracle Developer Cloud Service simplifies development with an automatically provisioned development platform that supports the complete development lifecycle. Oracle Storage Cloud Service enables businesses to store and manage digital content in the cloud. Oracle Messaging Cloud Service provides an infrastructure that enables communication between software components by sending and receiving messages via a single messaging API, establishing a dynamic, automated business workflow environment.”

All in all, the article examines the Java PaaS space and presents guidelines in selecting a Java PaaS service. It offers a basic description of Oracle’s Java PaaS solution—Oracle Java Cloud Service—and its capabilities. Looking ahead, Part 2 will go deeper into Oracle Java Cloud Service by showing how to develop and deploy a Java EE application on it.

Check out the latest issue of Java Magazine.

Friday Mar 15, 2013

Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense

A new article by Björn Müller, now up on otn/java, titled “Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense” incisively explores the intricacies of when, where, and how JavaFX is a good technology fit.

Müller writes:
 “Our experience proves that implementing an employee desktop front end with native technology is a valid approach and that JavaFX is a good fit.

* JavaFX is available on the leading desktop operating systems (Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X)
* Although it has gone through some painful changes, its evolution proves its vendor’s level of commitment.
* As the successor to Swing, it is being used by an increasing number of Java developers. Regardless of its future, it will benefit from a strong developer community.
* Compared to Swing, it provides a clear and clean architecture and features many enhancements: styling, event management, transitions, scene graph—to name a few.
* It provides the possibility of developing up-to-date user interfaces with animations, multitouch, and the like.
* It is based on a clear and clean language: Java.
* It provides all the professional Java tooling required to debug, analyze, profile, and log a client application.
* It enables a simple app-like installation on the client side, without any prerequisites.”

Müller provides a nuanced discussion of the kinds of architecture in which JavaFX should be embedded, its uses with JavaServer Faces, and reports on his own experiences using JavaFX.

Have a look at the article here.

Tuesday Aug 14, 2012

Enterprise JavaFX Deployment with LightView: Part 3 now on otn/java

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, now up on otn/java, titled “Enterprise JavaFX Deployment with LightView: Part 3,” explores ways to use Maven 3 to build and deploy the LightView application in all available deployment modes. In addition, Bien shows how to sign and deploy LightView with a Java EE 6 application.

Bien explains the basics:

“LightView uses the HTTP (REST) protocol to communicate with the back-end server. For the realization of back-end communication, an external library—the Jersey client—is used. LightView connects with the back end (LightFish) at startup time, so it is not suitable to lazy-load the Jersey dependencies for optimization purposes. Furthermore, multiple JAR files are hard to handle for standalone applications; you have to set up the class path correctly and keep all the moving parts consistent. The most convenient way to deploy Java (and JavaFX) applications is simply by starting them with java -jar my-killer-app.jar and deploying a single file that contains all the dependencies.”

He shows how the class files are packaged with the javafxpackager, which is shipped with the JavaFX 2 SDK, using the exec-maven-plugin and explains the core tasks achieved by Maven and describes the what javafxpackager does behind the scenes. He then shows how the LightView application operates and interacts with LightFish.

Bien concludes by emphasizing that the richness of JavaFX lies in the fact that it is another Java library. “Because JavaFX is ‘just’ an additional Java library, all of the established build, test, and deployment infrastructure can be reused. You can develop JavaFX applications using any integrated development environment (IDE) you like. And best of all, you can use a single language in a project, from the Java EE back end to the JavaFX front end.”

Check out the article here.

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