Wednesday May 18, 2016

Java Euro Tour

Bruno Souza, Edson Yanaga, and Otávio Santana are touring European JUGs talking about DevOps, big data, currency API, CDI 2 and cloud scalability. The team is also interviewing Java Champions, renowned Java speakers and community leaders in their homes and at work. Watch the replay of those interviews 

Some of the topics they present at JUGs: 
  • Containers and DevOps: full delivery cycle for Java applications  
  • Big Data and NoSQL with CDI and Cassandra 
  • First steps with the Money and Currency API, JSR 354 
  • Using CDI 2.0 in Java SE world - Contexts and Dependency Injection 2.0 (JSR-365) 
  • A Developer's Journey From Monoliths to Microservices 
  • Multi-cloud scalability: NoSQL with Cassandra, JavaEE, CDI and Containers. 
Java champions and community leaders interviewed include Andres Almiray, Ixchel Ruiz, Michael Hoffer, Wener Keil, Hendrik Ebbers, and Simon Ritter - to name a few. Watch the replay of all the interviews and follow the tour @brjavaman  

Tuesday Mar 29, 2016

Moving to Garbage First

Garbage First (G1) is likely to become the default collector in Java 9. In this presentation, Kirk Pepperdine shows different case studies on how to use the G1 with your applications. He also demonstrates tips and tricks to work around some of the hiccups. 


In this interview, Kirk Pepperdine shows his Censum performance diagnostics tool from jClarity and describes the state of G1 GC 


Waste Management in JDK 9

“Instead of a simple garbage collector to free up memory, Garbage First (G1) takes the role of a waste management consultant: freeing unused memory and identifying ways to reduce the overall amount of garbage.” explains Eric Costlow in a new blog

Costlow demonstrates how string Deduplication can significantly decrease heap usage. Using the Eclipse IDE, he runs a performance test using Java Flight Recorder to benchmark the results.

Monday Mar 28, 2016

Module System in JDK 9

From original blog post by Mark Reinhold 

The module system (JSR 376 and JEP 261), was integrated into JDK 9 last week and is now available for testing in early-access build 111.

Project Jigsaw is an enormous effort, encompassing six JEPs implemented by dozens of engineers over many years. So far we’ve defined a modular structure for the JDK (JEP 200), reorganized the source code according to that structure (JEP 201), and restructured the JDK and JRE run-time images to support modules (JEP 220).

Like the previous major change, the introduction of modular run-time images, the introduction of the module system might impact you even if you don’t make direct use of it. That’s because the module system is now fully operative at both compile time and run time, at least for the modules comprising the JDK itself. Most of the JDK’s internal APIs are, as a consequence, fully encapsulated and hence, by default, inaccessible to code outside of the JDK.

An existing application that uses only standard Java SE APIs and runs on JDK 8 should just work, as they say, on JDK 9. If, however, your application uses a JDK-internal API, or uses a library or framework that does so, then it’s likely to fail. In many cases you can work around this via the -XaddExports option of the javac and java commands. If, e.g., your application uses the internal sun.security.x509.X500Name class then you can enable access to it via the option

-XaddExports:java.base/sun.security.x509=ALL-UNNAMED 

This causes all members of the sun.security.x509 package in the java.base module to be exported to the special unnamed module in which classes from the class path are defined.

Read more

Thursday Mar 24, 2016

Docker for Repeatable Builds

Learn how to create reliable, fast and repeatable builds. Andrzej Grzesik  presents a case study of an externally facing API project with complex dependencies and different approaches to improve processes and quality. It explores build infrastructure, from under-the-desk bare metal, through ad hoc provisioned VMs, as well as containers. 

Tuesday Mar 15, 2016

JAX-RS and Hypermedia

How to build a Hypermedia-Driven RESTful Web Service. Sebastian Daschner describes different approaches to realize RESTful services with JavaEE 7 and JAX-RS. Watch his presentation as he shows best practices and different frameworks that accelerate your development.

Wednesday Mar 09, 2016

The State of the Module System

Original Post from Java Architect Mark Reinhold about the Jigsaw Project

This is an informal overview of enhancements to the Java SE Platform prototyped in Project Jigsaw and proposed for JSR 376: The Java Platform Module System. A related document describes enhancements to JDK-specific tools and APIs, which are outside the scope of the JSR.

As described in the JSR, the specific goals of the module system are to provide
• Reliable configuration, to replace the brittle, error-prone class-path mechanism with a means for program components to declare explicit dependences upon one another, along with

• Strong encapsulation, to allow a component to declare which of its public types are accessible to other components, and which are not.

These features will benefit application developers, library developers, and implementors of the Java SE Platform itself directly and, also, indirectly, since they will enable a scalable platform, greater platform integrity, and improved performance.

Contents: 
1 Defining Modules 
2 Using Modules 
3 Compatibility & Migration 
4 Services 
5 Advanced Topics 

Read the full post 

Thursday Mar 03, 2016

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers

Which Java SE 8 APIs should you use in your Java EE 7 applications? It’s been two years since Java SE 8 was released, and Java EE 7 has been around almost three years. How can you combine both technologies and boost your productivity? Of course your application server provider should support both technologies.

In his presentation, David Delabasse explains how to use eight Java SE APIs that will help you with your Java EE applications. He shows a demonstration on how to implement each of the following Java SE libraries: Date and Time APIs, JPA converters, Java Server Faces, annotations, optional, string joiner, stream API, and Nashorn Javascript Engine. 

This presentation is part of the next Virtual Technology Summit sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network. Register! It is free. For your convenience, we offer the event in three time zones as follows: 
  • Americas - March 8th- 9:30am to 1:00 PST - Register
  • APAC - March 15th - 9:30am to 1:00pm IST - Register
  • EMEA - April 5th - 9:30am to 1:00pm BST - Register
This VTS provides two tracks on Java SE and Java EE with six hands-on sessions. Check out the full VTS agenda here  

Tuesday Dec 01, 2015

Libraries Finding the Right One!

By Magazine Editor Andrew Binstock

Welcome to the November/December 2015 issue of Java Magazine. Consistent with our new, more technical direction, this issue dives into the core building blocks of software development: libraries.

Most developers use a small set of familiar libraries, venturing beyond them only when forced to. Despite the enormous number of available open source libraries, we rarely try new options, in part because we fear the time spent learning to use them might not be rewarded with a usable option. With that in mind, Java Magazine has found several libraries for common tasks that are well worth your time: JCommander (an original solution to command-line parsing that attacks the limitations of most of the widely used options), jsoup (an elegant HTML parser), and Byte Buddy (a greatly simplified way of doing runtime bytecode generation). Finally, for a tad more of a technical deep dive, we've include a detailed examination of exactly how libraries are located, loaded, and run by the JVM.

For readers who want to look at the latest in the architecture of modern apps, we begin a two-part tutorial on using Docker-the emerging, preferred type of container.

And for enterprise developers, we conclude our four-part serieson CDI in Java EE and begin a two-part series on programming with WebSockets. Part 1 of this series shows everything needed to get going: setting up a long-lived connection and moving data back and forth across it.

Our long-running cycle of JVM languages continues with an in-depth examination of Jython, the highly regarded port of Python. Our previous language in this cycle was Kotlin; our next one will be Gosu.

As usual, we bundle my editor's column (here advocating simplification of open-source licensing), our detailed book review, a series of quiz questions from certification exams, readers' letters to the editor, and a schedule of upcoming events. Subscribe today for free! 

Tuesday Aug 04, 2015

Java EE 8 Update

The train has left the station with the results of the community survey. Expert groups are working right now on specifications for the dozen or so JSRs that will be included in the release. In the interview below, David Delabasse gives an overview of the two new Java EE APIs: Java Security and MVC. The Java EE evangelist team is sharing the progress of this new release, making sure that the community stays up-to-date. David's session, a Java EE 8 overview, is now live on Parleys. 

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