Tuesday Apr 30, 2013

Everything on the NetBeans Platform

NetBeans Principal Product Manager Geertjan Wielenga describes a myriad of software tools and applications in his blog in fields as diverse as biology, security, airport management, data analysis, data modeling, radiology, home automation, retail, and equipment safety - all of them created on the Netbeans Platform: 
  • Alphalogic, an easy to use tool with high level integration, control and monitoring for engineering systems and security systems 
  • Platypus Application Designer, a tool to develop the structure of database applications, reusable SQL queries and client/server applications
  • Sypherlink Harvester, a tool collecting metadata, database statistics, sample data and more in relational and non-relational data sources
  • Total Airport Management (TAM) 
  • Summit Management Systems, an data acquisition and floor plant monitoring tools for assembly processes
  • Integrated Service Technology, a testing and analysis solution for integrated circuits 
  • DigiMed, a radiology software for hospitals in Mexico 
  • Ksenia, a security system configuration software 
  • Vimar, a home automation management software 
  • Phyloviz, a visualization software tool for Phylogenetics
  • Delcam Crispin, a footwear CAD/CAM software 
  • Autopsy, a digital forensics platform
  • Sristy Technologies, a software solutions to analyze seismic data, drilling, completion and reservoirs for the energy sector
  • HEIDE, a multiprocessor microcontroller platform 
  • SIEUFERD, a universal user interface for relational databases 
  • Polaris Slipstream, an extensive data modeling application designed for NASA Mission visualization
  • MammoControl DIANNA, a tools analyzing and transmitting managraphy images for the German Breast Cancer Screening Program 
  • IGS-Bio, a motion capture software application
  • Klinika Medical Assistant, a EMR software used in the Philipines 
  • A series of software from Satlantic, an ocean technology company 
  • Mongkie, an integrated network visualization platform for biological data 
  • 4Vending, a vending machine management solution 
  • Piraso, an open source debugger and analyzer tool 
  • SafetyMach, a European safety requirement software 
Check his blog for details on each project. 


Monday Apr 08, 2013

Technical Article: Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” is up on otn/java. The article demonstrates how Java EE 7 with JAX-RS 2.0 has several new useful features which further simplify development, and lead to the creation of more sophisticated Java SE/EE RESTful applications.

Using a Java-friendly, but simplistic JAX-RS 2.0 example Bien takes the reader through aspects, request interception, client and configuration issues and much more. He concludes the article as follows:

“Interestingly, JAX-RS does not even require a full-fledged application server. After fulfilling the specified Context Types, a JAX-RS 2.0–compliant API can be anything. However, the combination with EJB 3.2 brings asynchronous processing, pooling (and so throttling), and monitoring. Tight integration with Servlet 3+ comes with efficient asynchronous processing of @Suspended responses through AsyncContext support and CDI runtime brings eventing. Also Bean Validation is well integrated and can be used for validation of resource parameters. Using JAX-RS 2.0 together with other Java EE 7 APIs brings the most convenient (=no configuration) and most productive (=no re-invention) way of exposing objects to remote systems.”

Check out the article here.

Wednesday Nov 21, 2012

Get Started with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder

Up on otn/java is a very useful article by Oracle Java/Middleware/Core Tech Engineer Mark Heckler, titled, “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder.”  Heckler, who has development experience in numerous environments, shows developers how to develop a JavaFX application using Scene Builder “in less time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee, while learning your way around in the process”.

He begins with a warning and a reassurance: “JavaFX is a new paradigm and can seem a bit imposing when you first take a look at it. But remember, JavaFX is easy and fun. Let's give it a try.”

Next, after showing readers how to download and install JDK/JavaFX and Scene Builder, he informs the reader that they will “create a simple JavaFX application, create and modify a window using Scene Builder, and successfully test it in under 15 minutes.”

Then readers download some NetBeans files:
EasyJavaFX.java contains the main application class. We won't do anything with this class for our example, as its primary purpose in life is to load the window definition code contained in the FXML file and then show the main stage/scene. You'll keep the JavaFX terms straight with ease if you relate them to the theater: a platform holds a stage, which contains scenes.

SampleController.java is our controller class that provides the ‘brains’ behind the graphical interface. If you open the SampleController, you'll see that it includes a property and a method tagged with @FXML. This tag enables the integration of the visual controls and elements you define using Scene Builder, which are stored in an FXML (FX Markup Language) file.

Sample.fxml is the definition file for our sample window. You can right-click and Edit the filename in the tree to view the underlying FXML -- and you may need to do that if you change filenames or properties by hand - or you can double-click on it to open it (visually) in Scene Builder.”

Then Scene Builder enters the picture and the task is soon done.

Check out the article here.

Sunday Sep 30, 2012

The Java Specialist: An Interview with Java Champion Heinz Kabutz

Dr. Heinz Kabutz is well known for his Java Specialists’ Newsletter, initiated in November 2000, where he displays his acute grasp of the intricacies of the Java platform for an estimated 70,000 readers; for his work as a consultant; and for his workshops and trainings at his home on the Island of Crete where he has lived since 2006 -- where he is known to curl up on the beach with his laptop to hack away, in between dips in the Mediterranean.

Kabutz was born of German parents and raised in Cape Town, South Africa, where he developed a love of programming in junior high school through his explorations on a ZX Spectrum computer. He received a B.S. from the University of Cape Town, and at 25, a Ph.D., both in computer science.

He will be leading a two-hour hands-on lab session, HOL6500 – “Finding and Solving Java Deadlocks,” at this year’s JavaOne that will explore what causes deadlocks and how to solve them.

Q: Tell us about your JavaOne plans.

A: I am arriving on Sunday evening and have just one hands-on-lab to do on Monday morning. This is the first time that a non-Oracle team is doing a HOL at JavaOne under Oracle's stewardship and we are all a bit nervous about how it will turn out. Oracle has been immensely helpful in getting us set up. I have a great team helping me: Kirk Pepperdine, Dario Laverde, Benjamin Evans and Martijn Verburg from jClarity, Nathan Reynolds from Oracle, Henri Tremblay of OCTO Technology and Jeff Genender of Savoir Technologies.

Monday will be hard work, but after that, I will hopefully get to network with fellow Java experts, attend interesting sessions and just enjoy San Francisco. Oh, and my kids have already given me a shopping list of things to get, like a GoPro Hero 2 dive housing for shooting those nice videos of Crete. (That's me at the beginning diving down.)

Q: What sessions are you attending that we should know about?

A: Sometimes the most unusual sessions are the best. I avoid the "big names". They often are spread too thin with all their sessions, which makes it difficult for them to deliver what I would consider deep content. I also avoid entertainers who might be good at presenting but who do not say that much.

In 2010, I attended a session by Vladimir Yaroslavskiy where he talked about sorting. Although he struggled to speak English, what he had to say was spectacular. There was hardly anybody in the room, having not heard of Vladimir before. To me that was the highlight of 2010. Funnily enough, he was supposed to speak with Joshua Bloch, but if you remember, Google cancelled. If Bloch has been there, the room would have been packed to capacity.

Q: Give us an update on the Java Specialists’ Newsletter.

A: The Java Specialists' Newsletter continues being read by an elite audience around the world. The apostrophe in the name is significant.  It is a newsletter for Java specialists. When I started it twelve years ago, I was trying to find non-obvious things in Java to write about. Things that would be interesting to an advanced audience.

As an April Fool's joke, I told my readers in Issue 44 that subscribing would remain free, but that they would have to pay US$5 to US$7 depending on their geographical location. I received quite a few angry emails from that one. I would have not earned that much from unsubscriptions. Most readers stay for a very long time.

After Oracle bought Sun, the Java community held its breath for about two years whilst Oracle was figuring out what to do with Java. For a while, we were quite concerned that there was not much progress shown by Oracle. My newsletter still continued, but it was quite difficult finding new things to write about. We have probably about 70,000 readers, which is quite a small number for a Java publication. However, our readers are the top in the Java industry. So I don't mind having "only" 70000 readers, as long as they are the top 0.7%.

Java concurrency is a very important topic that programmers think they should know about, but often neglect to fully understand. I continued writing about that and made some interesting discoveries. For example, in Issue 165, I showed how we can get thread starvation with the ReadWriteLock. This was a bug in Java 5, which was corrected in Java 6, but perhaps a bit too much. Whereas we could get starvation of writers in Java 5, in Java 6 we could now get starvation of readers. All of these interesting findings make their way into my courseware to help companies avoid these pitfalls.

Another interesting discovery was how polymorphism works in the Server HotSpot compiler in Issue 157 and Issue 158. HotSpot can inline methods from interfaces that have only one implementation class in the JVM. When a new subclass is instantiated and called for the first time, the JVM will undo the previous optimization and re-optimize differently.

Here is a little memory puzzle for your readers:

public class JavaMemoryPuzzle {
  private final int dataSize =
      (int) (Runtime.getRuntime().maxMemory() * 0.6);

  public void f() {
    {
      byte[] data = new byte[dataSize];
    }
    byte[] data2 = new byte[dataSize];
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    JavaMemoryPuzzle jmp = new JavaMemoryPuzzle();
    jmp.f();
  }
}


When you run this you will always get an OutOfMemoryError, even though the local variable data is no longer visible outside of the code block.

So here comes the puzzle, that I'd like you to ponder a bit. If you very politely ask the VM to release memory, then you don't get an OutOfMemoryError:

public class JavaMemoryPuzzlePolite {
  private final int dataSize =
      (int) (Runtime.getRuntime().maxMemory() * 0.6);

  public void f() {
    {
      byte[] data = new byte[dataSize];
    }

    for(int i=0; i<10; i++) {
      System.out.println("Please be so kind and release memory");
    }
    byte[] data2 = new byte[dataSize];
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    JavaMemoryPuzzlePolite jmp = new JavaMemoryPuzzlePolite();
    jmp.f();
    System.out.println("No OutOfMemoryError");
  }
}


Why does this work? When I published this in my newsletter, I received over 400 emails from excited readers around the world, most of whom sent me the wrong explanation. After the 300th wrong answer, my replies became unfortunately a bit curt. Have a look at Issue 174 for a detailed explanation, but before you do, put on your thinking caps and try to figure it out yourself.

Q: What do you think Java developers should know that they currently do not know?

A: They should definitely get to know more about concurrency. It is a tough subject that most programmers try to avoid. Unfortunately we do come in contact with it. And when we do, we need to know how to protect ourselves and how to solve tricky system errors.

Knowing your IDE is also useful. Most IDEs have a ton of shortcuts, which can make you a lot more productive in moving code around. Another thing that is useful is being able to read GC logs. Kirk Pepperdine has a great talk at JavaOne that I can recommend if you want to learn more. It's this: CON5405 – “Are Your Garbage Collection Logs Speaking to You?”

Q: What are you looking forward to in Java 8?

A: I'm quite excited about lambdas, though I must confess that I have not studied them in detail yet. Maurice Naftalin's Lambda FAQ is quite a good start to document what you can do with them. I'm looking forward to finding all the interesting bugs that we will now get due to lambdas obscuring what is really going on underneath, just like we had with generics.

I am quite impressed with what the team at Oracle did with OpenJDK's performance. A lot of the benchmarks now run faster.

Hopefully Java 8 will come with JSR 310, the Date and Time API. It still boggles my mind that such an important API has been left out in the cold for so long.

What I am not looking forward to is losing perm space. Even though some systems run out of perm space, at least the problem is contained and they usually manage to work around it. In most cases, this is due to a memory leak in that region of memory. Once they bundle perm space with the old generation, I predict that memory leaks in perm space will be harder to find. More contracts for us, but also more pain for our customers.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

Thursday Sep 27, 2012

Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Raghavan Srinivas

Raghavan Srinivas, affectionately known as “Rags,” is a two-time JavaOne Rock Star (from 2005 and 2011) who, as a Developer Advocate at Couchbase, gets his hands dirty with emerging technology directions and trends. His general focus is on distributed systems, with a specialization in cloud computing. He worked on Hadoop and HBase during its early stages, has spoken at conferences world-wide on a variety of technical topics, conducted and organized Hands-on Labs and taught graduate classes.

He has 20 years of hands-on software development and over 10 years of architecture and technology evangelism experience and has worked for Digital Equipment Corporation, Sun Microsystems, Intuit and Accenture. He has evangelized and influenced the architecture of numerous technologies including the early releases of JavaFX, Java, Java EE, Java and XML, Java ME, AJAX and Web 2.0, and Java Security.

Rags will be giving these sessions at JavaOne 2012:
  • CON3570 -- Autosharding Enterprise to Social Gaming Applications with NoSQL and Couchbase
  • CON3257 -- Script Bowl 2012: The Battle of the JVM-Based Languages (with Guillaume Laforge, Aaron Bedra, Dick Wall, and Dr Nic Williams)


Rags emphasized the importance of the Cloud: “The Cloud and the Big Data are popular technologies not merely because they are trendy, but, largely due to the fact that it's possible to do massive data mining and use that information for business advantage,” he explained.

I asked him what we should know about Hadoop. “Hadoop,” he remarked, “is mainly about using commodity hardware and achieving unprecedented scalability. At the heart of all this is the Java Virtual Machine which is running on each of these nodes. The vision of taking the processing to where the data resides is made possible by Java and Hadoop.”

And the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “I read recently that Java projects on github.com are just off the charts when compared to other projects. It's exciting to realize the robust growth of Java and the degree of collaboration amongst Java programmers.”

He encourages Java developers to take advantage of Java 7 for Mac OS X which is now available for download. At the same time, he also encourages us to read the caveats.

Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

Wednesday May 23, 2012

Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications, Part Two

Java Champion, Oracle Java Evangelist, and JavaFX expert Jim Weaver, has published Part Two of his article, "Best Practices for JavaFX 2.0 Enterprise Applications" on otn/java. Weaver continues to explore the possibilities of the TweetBrowser application, focusing now on new techniques and best practices that include:

* Leveraging a JavaFX cascading style sheet
* Implementing springs and struts in the UI
* Using a ternary operation in binding expressions
* Defining JavaFX properties
* Leveraging a Popup to implement a dialog box
* Using WebView to display a Web page

As Weaver emphasizes, there is a vast array of techniques and best practices that can be used in JavaFX applications. For example:

The JavaFX cascading style sheet (CSS) enables users to modify the appearance of an application.

The springs and struts concept enables a fixed horizontal strut and a variable horizontal spring so that an application can appear the way developers want it to appear, regardless of the size of the scene or the type of platform.

Go here to learn more about the rich possibilities of JavaFX 2.0 and enterprise applications.

Tuesday Mar 13, 2012

Key to the Java EE 6 Platform: NetBeans IDE 7.1

Oracle’s Geertjan Wielenga has a new article up on otn/java, titled “Key to the Java EE 6 Platform: NetBeans IDE 7.1,” in which he shows how the NetBeans IDE provides the tools, templates, and code generators to support Java EE 6 and its main specifications.

He initially observes that, “When you begin to grasp the breadth and ambition of the Java EE 6 Platform, which covers everything from the model (JPA and Bean Validation), to the controller (EJB and Servlets), to the view (JavaServer Faces), a simple entry point is difficult to find. Enter NetBeans IDE 7.1, which is Oracle’s IDE for the Java Platform, created by the same group of developers who created the Java EE 6 Platform. Here you find tools, templates, and code generators intended to be used in combination with the set of specifications that the Java EE 6 Platform encompasses.”

After offering a tour of the NetBeans IDE 7.1 tools that support Java EE 6, Wielenga ends on a cautionary note:

“While code generators and tools such as those described here are great to help you get your feet wet, a danger is that a lot of code is generated that you don't understand and that you therefore do not know how to debug and maintain. The good news is that far less code needs to be generated in Java EE 6 than before, making it far easier to understand and maintain.

Nevertheless, it is advisable to use tools of this kind intelligently. Start small, focusing on specific APIs. Get to know them via the generated code and then slowly extend the application as you become more familiar with the Java EE 6 Platform. Once you are comfortable with the spec, the tools aim to help you become more productive: combining the leanness of the Java EE 6 Platform with the tools in the IDE, you'll be rapidly creating the core of your application.”

Check out the article.


Wednesday Mar 07, 2012

Java Champion Jonas Bonér Explains the Akka Framework

In a new interview on otn/java, titled “Java Champion Jonas Bonér Explains the Akka Framework,” Jonas Bonér explores the intricacies of Akka, an open source platform for next-generation event-driven, scalable, fault-tolerant architectures on the JVM. He argues that the way concurrency is typically performed in Java with shared-state consistency is needlessly difficult, resulting in concurrent access to shared mutable state guarded by locks, which are notoriously hard to understand and get right. Locks, from Bonér’s perspective, do not compose, scale poorly, have complicated error recovery and are, generally, too low level.

From the article itself:

“Akka offers multiple solutions to the concurrency problem. It provides a toolkit for addressing concurrency, scalability, and high-availability concerns. It provides one thing to learn and one thing to use. Akka has multiple tools that will help you as a developer. Actors, futures, agents, and software transactional memory all raise the abstraction level and make it easer to write, understand, and maintain concurrent, scalable, fault-tolerant code. Instead of messing around with very low-level constructs, you think in terms of higher-level concepts such as message flows and transactions. What is usually solved by use of low-level plumbing in standard enterprise applications becomes workflow in Akka. So you start to think about how the data flows in the systems rather than how to get the concurrency and scalability exactly right.”

Read the complete article here.

Monday Jan 09, 2012

Interfaces on Demand with CDI and EJB 3.1

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, up on otn/java, “Interfaces on Demand with CDI and EJB 3.1” explains that since Java EE 6, interfaces are no longer required by the container in order to realize common use cases, thus enabling developers to use them more consciously and strategically for the realization of business logic. Bien shows how interfaces can now be used as vehicles for encapsulation or abstraction, as they were originally intended.

From the article:

“There is nothing wrong with the abstraction of every implementation with an interface if such an approach can be clearly justified, but interfaces become dubious when you have to introduce artificial naming conventions to avoid name clashes…
Interfaces should be introduced only as a contract for already existing classes, for the realization of Strategy or Bridge patterns, or when you need to design an API, such as Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), Java Message Service (JMS), and so on. In typical business applications, this occurs in only a fraction of all cases.”
Read the complete article here.


Friday Nov 18, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 at Devoxx 2011

JavaFX had a big presence at Devoxx 2011 as witnessed by the number of sessions this year given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers.

  •     “JavaFX 2.0 -- A Java Developer's Guide” by Java Champions Stephen Chin and Peter Pilgrim
  •     “JavaFX 2.0 Hands On” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “Animation Bringing your User Interfaces to Life” by Michael Heinrichs and John Yoong (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Complete Guide to Writing Custom Bindings in JavaFX 2.0” by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Java Rich Clients with JavaFX 2.0” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Properties & Bindings for Experts” (and those who want to become experts) by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “JavaFX Under the Hood” by Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Open Mic” with Jasper Potts and Richard Bair


With the release of JavaFX 2.0 and Oracle’s move towards an open development model with an open bug database already created, it’s a great time for developers to take the JavaFX plunge.


One Devoxx attendee, Mark Stephens, a developer at IDRsolutions blogged about a problem he was having setting up JavaFX on NetBeans to work on his Mac. He wrote:


“I’ve tried desperate measures (I even read and reread the instructions) but it did not help. Luckily, I am at Devoxx at the moment and there seem to be a lot of JavaFX gurus here (and it is running on all their Macs). So I asked them… It turns out that sometimes the software does not automatically pickup the settings like it should do if you give it the JavaFX SDK path. The solution is actually really simple (isn’t it always once you know). Enter these values manually and it will work.”


He simply entered certain values and his problem was solved. He thanked Java Champion Stephen Chin, “for a great talk at Devoxx and putting me out of my misery.”


JavaFX in Java Magazine

Over in the November/December 2011 issue of Java Magazine, Oracle’s Simon Ritter, well known for his creative Java inventions at JavaOne, has an article up titled “JavaFX and Swing Integration” in which he shows developers how to use the power of JavaFX to migrate Swing interfaces to JavaFX. The consensus among JavaFX experts is that JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform.


In the same issue Java Champion and JavaFX maven James Weaver has an article, “Using Transitions for Animation in JavaFX 2.0”. In addition, Oracle’s Vice President of Java Client Development, Nandini Ramani, provides the keys to unlock the mysteries of JavaFX 2.0 in her Java Magazine interview.


Look for the JavaFX community to grow and flourish in coming years.

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