Tuesday Apr 07, 2015

Devoxx France 2015

Taking place this week April 8 to 10 in Paris is Devoxx France, one of five Java developer conferences in Europe. The conference is in English and French and all the sessions will be available on Parleys website a couple of weeks after the conference. 

This year, Oracle is a Platinum sponsor. Check out the Oracle Java sessions:  

Java Mission Control for Earthlings
April 9, 15:10 - 16:00
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Java 9 Plan
April 9, 16:35 – 17:25
Brian Goetz, Java Language Architect, Oracle
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

Java EE 7 Batch Processing in the Real World
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java 8 EE, A Snapshot Overview
April 9, 17:40 - 18:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Java EE Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 20:30 – 21:30, Neuilly 252 AB
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Domotique et Java, Birds of Feather Session
April 9, 21:30 – 22:30, Paris 202-203 Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Batch API (JSR 352) Hands-on Lab
April 10, 11:00 – 13:50, Paris 224M-225M Lab
David Delabassee, Software Evangelist, Oracle

Project Jigsaw
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Maillot
Paul Sandoz, Software Developer, Oracle

IoT, Java, and Autonomous Drones
April 10, 14:05 – 14:55, Room: Amphi Bleu
James Weaver, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle

Finally, Security API JSR 375
April 10, 15:10 – 16:00, Room: Paris 241
Alex Kosowski, Principal Member of Technical Staff. Oracle

If you attend the conference, please swing by booth #P04 and chat with Java experts who will be onsite answering questions.

Monday Apr 21, 2014

Devoxx 2014 Vive La (Digital) Révolution!

Last week's Devoxx France conference in Paris was sold out months in advance. The conference is part of the Devoxx family and is organized by the Paris JUG for the francophone developer community.  

The conference provided an array of technical sessions, including conference sessions, hands-on labs, university sessions,  quickies, tools-in-action and birds-of-a-feather (BoF) that will become available on Parleys in coming weeks. The broad range of topics touched on Agile and DevOps methodologies, Web, HTML5, mobile, startups, cloud, Big Data, Groovy, Ceylon, Java SE and Java EE.  Senior engineer Paul Sandoz presented Java 8 lambdas in the stream, which is one of the main features of Java 8. The new feature is designed to enable bulk data. Professor José Paumard presented 50 new things that you could do with Java 8. He discussed ConcurrentHashMap, the new HashMap and Date & Time APi as well as small improvements that ease development. Not everyone will implement the lambdas right away, he said, but with Java 8 they will still be able to benefit from the new version. Java Evangelist Stephen Chin demonstrated the full power of Java 8 with lambdas running on Raspberry Pi, PandaBoard, the Lego Mindstorms EV3 and other embedded devices during his university session. 

The keynote speakers echoed this year's theme of "born to be" a developer in the digital era. They explained how developers have a strategic role and are makers of the digital revolution. For example, entrepreneur Kwam Yamgnane considers that, as craftsmen in the IT trade, the developer's job goes beyond coding to collaboration with other disciplines and understanding not just the direction of the product but also of their company and the industry. With this understanding, developers need to be creative and agile to build better products, explains senior engineer Geert Bevin. They can use the same principal to build their career and find their passion. 

The second topic of the keynote was about engineering becoming more mainstream.  With the advent of the digital revolution, everyone needs to learn about technology because of its impact on our daily lives, on our careers and on new business creation, explains INRIA researcher Serge Abiteboul. Enterpreneur Henri Fournet is training beginners in programming and business acumen at Simplon, a successful year old educational company serving low income neighborhoods. Directors Dominique Van Deth and Danny Gooris at Oracle discussed the shortage of engineers today. In order to fill out the gap, Oracle trains high school and university teachers in Java programming for free. 

In addition, there were several activities where developers could collaborate, code or just explore. At the hackergarten, developers and open source committers contributed to a dozen of open source projects.  At the future lab and hackathons, there were a number of homemade and fun projects. Attendees could learn and change the interface of JavaFX games. A robotic xylophone was controlled by Raspberry Pi and Arduino. Wafting dry-ice fog exposed the green beams of a musical light show. You could fly the Crazyflie Quadcopter and meet the development team. Stay tuned for the video made by the Devoxx France team with the Crazyflie strafing the crowd during the keynote and meet and greet reception. The Nao robot was programmed onsite to dance to M.J.'s Thriller and other music.  Home automation applications controlled temperature, water heater and lights.  At the Code-Story, experts coded applications in front of the audience. For the third year,  the Devops Mercenaries presented tools, expert accounts, and guidelines for engineering teams to implement the methodology. More focused on entrepreneurship was the 'afternoon of deciders' where developers and industry leaders met to discuss big data, as well as Seed Networking, a speed dating session between entrepreneurs and developers. Devoxx4Kids welcomed a dozen children to learn programming with the Nao robot and other programming tools like Scratch and Greenfoot. 

Join us next at Devoxx UK June 12 and 13 in London. This is going to be another amazing Devoxx experience! 

Wednesday Mar 05, 2014

JavaOne 2014 Call for Papers Now Open!

It is time to submit all those talks you have been thinking about. "We have a huge focus on community at this event, and it would be great to have many proposals from the developer community." explains JavaOne Content Chair Stephen Chin.

There is a new dedicated track for Agile development this year, making a total of nine Java tracks.  This year's tracks are: 

• Clients and UI
• Core Java Platform
• Internet of Things
• Java Virtual Machine Languages
• Java and Security
• Tools and Techniques
• Server-Side Java
• Java in the Cloud
• Agile Development

There is no time to waste! The call for papers closes April 15th at 11:59 p.m. PDT  

You will receive a complimentary pass to JavaOne with an accepted talk.

There is a rolling submission process, so submit early! 

Wednesday Mar 28, 2012

Java Champion Jorge Vargas on Extreme Programming, Geolocalization, and Latin American Programmers

In a new interview, up on otn/java, titled “An Interview with Java Champion Jorge Vargas,” Jorge Vargas, a leading Mexican developer, discusses the process of introducing companies to Enterprise JavaBeans through the application of Extreme Programming. Among other things, he gives workshops about building code with agile techniques and creates a master project to build all apps based on Scrum, XP methods and Kanban. He focuses on building core components such as security, login, and menus. Vargas remarks, “This may sound easy, but it’s not—the process takes months and hundreds of hours, but it can be controlled, and with small iterations, we can translate customer requirements and problems of legacy systems to the new system.”

In regard to his work with geolocalization, he says: “We have launched a beta program of Yumbling, a geolocalization-based app, with mobile clients for BlackBerry, iPhone, Android, and Nokia, with a Web interface. The first challenge was to design a simple universal mechanism providing information to all clients and to minimize maintenance provision to them. I try not to generalize a lot—to avoid low performance or misunderstanding in processing data. We use the latest Java EE technology—during the last five years, I’ve taught people how to use Java EE efficiently.”

Check out the interview here.


Friday Feb 17, 2012

Michael Hüttermann on Agile ALM

A new interview on otn/java with Java Champion and Agile ALM expert Michael Hüttermann titled “Agile ALM: A Conversation with Java Champion and ALM Expert Michael Hüttermann,” explores ways to streamline the software development process through strategies that include task-based development, continuous integration, practical Scrum implementation, and more.

In the interview, Hüttermann explains the purpose of Agile ALM:

“Agile ALM provides structure for Agile. It’s up to the people who implement Agile ALM to apply Agile values (such as respect and open communication), Agile strategies (such as continuous integration, continuous inspection, and continuous deployment), and Agile processes (such as Scrum). It’s very important to be open-minded regarding the tools you use and to be free to switch from one tool to another. This is part of the continuous improvement process in which developers reflect continuously about what the team is doing and how to improve.”

He goes on to explore the strengths of different tool chains:

“One appealing tool chain integrates JIRA, Hudson, Eclipse, Mylyn, and FishEye. This tool chain fosters task-based development spanning different project roles and project phases. Another interesting chain is to connect Java with Scala and Groovy in order to leverage specific features of different languages on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). This can be helpful, for example, for setting up an environment for specifying and developing software collaboratively. Scala, with the specs2 library, and Groovy, with the easyb library, are examples of writing acceptance tests or applying behavior-driven development on the JVM where programmers and testers share the same infrastructure and are, thus, forced to work together closely.”

Read the complete article here.

Tuesday Oct 18, 2011

Java Champion Michael Hüttermann on Best Agile ALM Practices

Michael HüttermannJavaOne 2011 - Java Champion and Agile ALM expert Michael Hüttermann gave a session, "Agile Application Lifecycle Management (18180)" on Tues., Oct. 4, designed to help Java developers integrate flexible agile practices and lightweight tools into software development phases. Hüttermann is the author of Agile ALM and CEO of Systemtechnologie Hüttermann. 

He covered:

* Task-based development for aligning activities with tasks, resulting in traceable artifacts

* Advanced continuous integration, which involves frequently and systematically integrating, building, and testing applications

* Agile approaches to release, configuration, deployment, and requirements management

* State-of-the-art-tool chains

The standard criticism of ALM is that it causes vendor lock-in, which increases the overall cost of an application, leaving developers with the challenge of balancing the pluses and minuses of Agile ALM. While Hüttermann admits that this has traditionally been true, his conception of Agile ALM results in flexible, high-quality processes and tool chains that are sufficiently open to change to avoid lock-in. By relying on lightweight tool chains, developers can improve flexibility because they can readily replace small units of the overall infrastructure without touching other parts. One of the main purposes of Agile ALM is to minimize accidental complexity.

Among the take-aways from the session:

* Continuous integration (CI) refers to the automation of the build, test, and release process with the goal of integrating the activities of colleagues and the work items others produce. This can result in a build ecosystem in which a new-code commit directly triggers a continuous build.

* Agile ALM defines task-based activities that are aligned with requirements, which means the activities are linked to requirements and all changes are traceable to their requirements.

* Agile ALM Tools are no longer cumbersome, monolithic vehicles that can restrict development. They need no longer cover all facets of the ALM ecosystem. Mashups of lightweight, focused, service-oriented, customizable tools are gaining momentum. Developers should feel free to switch from one tool to another.

Agile ALM aficionados should check out the forthcoming Java Magazine article by Hüttermann, set for publication in the November/December issue. If you haven't registered for the magazine, run, don't walk. It's free!

And be on the look out for a forthcoming otn/java interview with Hüttermann as well.

Finally, this JavaOne 2011 presentation can also be viewed @ http://parleys.com/d/2666.

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