Friday Jun 21, 2013

JCP Survey!

The London Java Community (LJC), which is an Executive Committee member of the Java Community Process (JCP), is asking Java developers to participate in a JCP survey titled "What should the JCP be doing?

The JCP is the mechanism that decides on future standards related to Java technology. Those standards give users like you a choice of technologies to develop with and more independence from vendor solutions.  

The JCP cares about community feedback and has successfully encouraged community participation using transparent tracking processes. Take the survey, your feedback matters. 

Thursday Jun 06, 2013

A Java EE 7 Sneak Peek!

Next week, Wednesday the 12th, Oracle executives and technical experts will present the ins and outs of Java EE 7 in a live webcast

In this presentation, technical expert Arun Gupta gives a preview of the new and updated JSRs in Java EE 7. He also lays out the plans for Java EE 8. 

Join us for the live webcast: Introducing Java EE 7 on June 12th, 2013. It is free! 

Friday Mar 08, 2013

The Tech Events over 2 days

Today is International Women's Day and Global Tech Women founder Deanna Kosaraju commemorates the event by organizing the Voices Global Conference, a live streaming event celebrating women in technology. Women technologists from over 20 countries present a collection of technical talks including software for data center, testing, breakthrough innovation frameworks, community building, humanitarian projects, leadership, and more. Attendees can participate in group discussions, network online or at local gatherings, and watch the sessions online. All the sessions are streamed live and recorded. Registration is open. 

Another conference starting today is Java Developers Conference (JDC) in Cairo, Egypt. The conference brings together 600 developers and students for the biggest Java conference in Middle East and North Africa today and tomorrow. The Egyptian Java User Group (EGJUG) is organizing the two-day forum for knowledge exchange with its 4 tracks and 40 sessions in English and Arabic. 

Oracle technologist Mike Keith presents "creating a configuration standard for Java EE". Architect Christ Bailey has a talk titled "From Java Code to Java Heap The Adventurous Developer's guide to JVM Languages." Software Architect and JCP member Mohamed Taman  presents "a hack session titled JEE7.next() revealing the power of Websocket, JSON APIs & HTML5." Technologist Jernej Kase talks about "increasing Java EE development productivity to the max - for free." 

Also this weekend, Daniel Sachse is organizing a Google hangout hack night Saturday March 9, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. PST. Participants are expected to contribute to a JSR about Java EE technologies such as CDI and JSF among others. 


Thursday Feb 28, 2013

Java Tsunami on the Thames

London prepares for a surge of developer brainpower during the Devoxx UK conference on Tuesday and Wednesday, March 26th and 27th. Meet & Greet, global Java community, and Hackergarten are nice add-ons. Don't miss it - Register today

The fun really starts on Monday evening with an attendee Meet & Greet where attendees can relax, grab a drink and something to eat and, of course, meet fellow attendees and the speakers. 

In addition to U.K speakers, many international guests are scheduled, notably from the US. Twenty-eight user groups from across Europe are attending too. A veritable army of experts will be on hand to share their expertise with Devoxx attendees.  

Hackergarten takes place during the conference. There's no time limit; participants can stay and code for as long as they want. Just bring a laptop and write a plugin, a tutorial, a small feature, or a bug fix for a project that interests you alongside several open-source experts willing to share their knowledge. The organizers of two community projects called Adopt-a-JSR and Adopt Open JDK will be there to explain how to contribute to the future Java releases. 

Wednesday Feb 27, 2013

Java EE 7 Open and Transparent

In his blog titled "Transparency and Community Participation in Java EE 7", Java Evangelist Arun Gupta explains the "high level of transparency for all of the Java Specification Requests (JSRs) under the Java EE 7 umbrella" and the increase of up to 7.5x participation by Java developers from previous releases. 

Since October 2011, JCP 2.8 has set eight new transparency rules for all new projects. The rules require the disclosure of such information as Expert Group member information, technical discussions, public feedback, JSR schedule, RI and TCK processes, and public documentation. Arun shows how the transparency rules apply to the JSR 342 project. 

About 20 Java User Groups (JUGs) from around the world contributed to the fourteen Java EE 7 JSRs. In many cases, the JUGs involved contributed to several JSRs via the community run initiative Adopt-a-JSR.

Arun lists JUGs events, their presentations and the code they contributed as a results of those events. They are great examples for other JUGs to get involved. Java EE still has projects open and Individuals as well as JUGs can contribute in three steps: join a JUG, participate in Adopt-a-JSR, choose a Java EE 7 JSR.

Friday Feb 22, 2013

Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7

Oracle’s Java evangelist and noted Java EE expert, Arun Gupta, presented a session at the annual IOUC (International Oracle User Community) Summit, held January 14–16, 2013, at Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, California, where more than 100 top user group leaders from around the world gathered to share best practices, provide feedback, and receive updates from leading Oracle developers.

Gupta’s talk, titled "The Java EE 7 Platform: Higher Productivity and Embracing HTML5," presented a glimpse into the rich possibilities that will be available in Java EE 7 upon its release in the spring of 2013. He covered several major developments, including:

* Java API for RESTful Web Services 2.0
* Java Message Service 2.0
* Java API for JSON Processing 1.0
* Java API for WebSocket 1.0
* Bean Validation 1.1
* Batch Applications for the Java Platform 1.0
* Java Persistence API 2.1
* Servlet 3.1
* Concurrency Utilities for Java EE 1.0
* JavaServer Faces 2.2

Gupta focuses on ways in which Java EE 7 offers higher productivity; less boilerplate; richer functionality; more default options; and HTML5 support in the form of WebSocket and JSON. He also observed that the cloud is in need of more standards. From the article:

"There are not enough standards in the cloud with W3C and other standards bodies. More standards are needed so that we can define a Java API for the cloud. Premature standardization can also be a problem if not enough innovation has taken place. So what is the right thing for the platform? We have reached out to the community, the core group members, and the executive committee of the Java Community Process and have focused on providing higher productivity and on embracing the HTML5 platform more closely. We are going to use dependency injection a lot more, which will give developers the ability to write less boilerplate code and offer richer functionality such as batch applications and caching. Similarly, for HTML5, we are embracing WebSocket functionality and the ability to parse and generate a JSON structure. We are providing support for HTML5-friendly markup as part of JSF.”

Gupta summarized the strengths of the various JSRs and closed by encouraging developers to participate in Adopt-a-JSR, a project that enables them to, “pursue their interest in particular Java EE 7 JSRs and download code, play with it, report bugs, and offer feedback to Java EE 7 specification leads.”

Check out the article here.

Monday Feb 04, 2013

FOSDEM 2013



The annual Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting took place last weekend in Belgium. The free event brought together 5,000 hackers from the open source community. There were 477 speakers and 488 sessions with a mix of keynotes, lightning talks, certification exams and developer rooms talks.


Tasha Carl, Java architect and the leader of the Brussels Java user group, wrote a blog about FOSDEM and the Free Java developer room. She mentioned Java talks and posted pictures making you feel as if you were there. "The Free Java dev room at FOSDEM is since many years the biggest OpenJDK meet-up around. You can not only see, but really high-five celebrities like – this year – Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle, Sean Coffey, Oracle JDK engineer and maintainer of OpenJDK 7u, Steve Poole, developer and evangelist working since ever  for IBM on the JVM, Simon Phipps, Andrew Haley, Charles Nutter, JRuby lead developer speaking about InvokeDynamic,…" she commented.


In another blog, Mani mentioned that "the OpenJDK topic has got massive coverage with 17 speakers, speaking and holding events covering various topics." Java community leaders including Martijn Verburg and Ben Evans were involved in the Java track. In addition to Brussels JUG, members of LJC JUG, CEJUG and others participated at the event.


In her blog, Heather VanCura shares the Java Community Process (JCP) presentation titled "JCP State of the Nation and Future Directions," as well as links to JCP.Next and the community program Adopt-a-JSR programs.


Friday Feb 01, 2013

The JCP Evolution!

Recent changes to the Java Community Process (JCP) program "focus on the way the organization itself is structured and organized" explained Patrick in this interview.  The changes will result from the implementation of three Java Specification Requests (JSRs). The first JSR, the JSR 348, makes the process more open and transparent to facilitate developers' participation. It was released a year ago and Heather witnessed increased transparency in projects,  additional participation and a simplified release process. "They are using public issue trackers and public discussion alias on projects. More people from the community are commenting and participating in the JSRs. The process of releasing final and maintenance releases is more agile," she commented.

She explained the different options for developers' participation in the JCP. Java user groups may become JCP members at no charge and contribute as a group. Individuals and user groups can contribute to the community initiative Adopt-A-JSR. Developers can give feedback on the transparency of a JSR process. Individuals, corporations and non-profit organizations (JUGs for example) can join the JCP. They then can comment on specs, join an expert group and become a spec lead





Information about the JCP program is available at jcp.org. Watch the recent presentation about Adopt-a-JSR with Martin Verburg and Java EE 7 JSR projects with Arun Gupta

Thursday Jan 24, 2013

OpenJDK, Adopt-A-JSR and Adopt OpenJDK Projects!

In two interviews, Martijn Verburg, leaders of the London Java user group and Cecilia Borg, Project Manager at Oracle explain the OpenJDK and two community projects Adopt-a-JSR and Adopt OpenJDK.  

"The Java Platform is huge and, to a lot of people, it is too big" explained Cecilia. "OpenJDK is divided into 22 different groups and 40 different projects to make it easy to participate." She recommends starting small by "subscribing to one of the mailing lists at openjdk.java.net" and contributing small bug fixes, for example.  It is important that contributors learn as much as possible and pick a project that feels right for them.


"The idea of Adopt-a-JSR is to have ordinary Java developers get involved with the creation of standards" indicates Martijn.  "Adopt-a-JSR is about Java EE and ME standards."  "The work on the Java language and the JVM is done as part of OpenJDK and Adopt OpenJDK projects," Verburg continues. He outlines how to start on those projects. Contributors can be individuals but also JUG leaders, who organize coding events to work on Java standards. 

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