Friday Oct 19, 2012

An Interview with JavaOne Rock Star Martijn Verburg

An interview with JavaOne Rock Star Martijn Verburg, by yours truly, titled “Challenging the Diabolical Developer: A Conversation with JavaOne Rock Star Martijn Verburg,” is now up on otn/java. Verburg, one of the leading movers and shakers in the Java community, is well known for his ‘diabolical developer” talks at JavaOne where he uncovers some of the worst practices that Java developers are prone to.

He mentions a few in the interview:

* “A lack of communication: Software development is far more a social activity than a technical one; most projects fail because of communication issues and social dynamics, not because of a bad technical decision. Sadly, many developers never learn this lesson.
* No source control: Some developers simply store code in local file systems and e-mail the code in order to integrate their changes; yes, this still happens.
* Design-driven design: Some developers are inclined to cram every design pattern from the Gang of Four (GoF) book into their projects. Of course, by that stage, they've actually forgotten why they're building the software in the first place.”

He points to a couple of core assumptions and confusions that lead to trouble:

“One is that developers think that the JVM is a magic box that will clean up their memory and make their code run fast, as well as make them cups of coffee. The JVM does help in a lot of cases, but bad code can and will still lead to terrible results!

The other trend is to try to force Java (the language) to do something it's not very good at, such as rapid Web development. So you get a proliferation of overly complex frameworks, libraries, and techniques trying to get around the fact that Java is a monolithic, statically typed, compiled, OO environment. It's not a Golden Hammer!”

Verburg has many insightful things to say about how to keep a Java User Group (JUG) going, about the “Adopt a JSR” program, bugathons, and much more.

Check out the article here.

Thursday Mar 01, 2012

Laying Out a User Interface with JavaFX 2.0

Java Champion and JavaFX expert Jim Weaver has a new article up on otn/java, titled “Laying Out a User Interface with JavaFX 2.0,” in which he shows developers how to use the layout capabilities of JavaFX 2.0 to make nodes in a scene graph appear where they belong and with the appropriate size.

He provides an overview of the LayoutSansTearsSolution application, shows how to make use of the SceneBuilder and BorderPaneBuilder classes, and helps readers understand the behavior of resizable nodes. Weaver explains the distinction between clamped and unbounded nodes and, finally, shows how to use CSS style sheet properties to modify the layout.

From the article:

“JavaFX has very powerful features for laying out a user interface... These features enable your applications to appear the way you want them to appear, regardless of the size of the scene or the type of platform. Understanding the behavior of each type of layout class, as well as concepts such as clamped versus unbounded nodes, will go a long way toward helping you make the UI appear exactly the way you want it.”

Read the complete article here.

Tuesday Oct 18, 2011

"Looking Back on JavaOne 2011" feature article

A JavaOne “afterglow” article, “Looking Back on JavaOne 2011” is up on otn/java. The article reviews the spirit, highlights, and feel of the 2011 JavaOne Conference.

From the article itself:

“It was at times difficult to take in all that has been achieved in the last year. The announcements at this year’s JavaOne came fast and furious -- the summer release of JDK 7 (including preview release for Mac OS X), the debut of JavaFX 2.0 (Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications), and ongoing progress on Java EE 7 (including taking Java EE into the Cloud). Meanwhile, at Monday’s Technical Keynote, it was pointed out that there are now 5 billion Java Cards in the world --contrasted with a global population of 6.5 billion. And then Tuesday’s Strategy Keynote brought Oracle’s announcement that it will open source JavaFX -- first the components, and then the rest of the framework -- as soon as there is approval from the OpenJDK community. And all the while, the OpenJDK community continues to grow, with recent members including IBM, Apple, SAP, and Twitter.”

Read the complete article.

Wednesday Jul 20, 2011

Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0

A new article by Java Champion and JavaFX expert, Jim Weaver, titled “Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0,” shows developers how to animate their nodes in scenes the easy way, using the JavaFX 2.0 TranslateTransition class. JavaFX comes with its own transition classes, whose purpose is to provide convenient ways to do commonly used animation tasks. The article shows how to use the TranslateTransition class to animate a node, moving it back and forth between two positions in the UI.

From the article:

“JavaFX 2.0 comes with several transition classes (that extend the Transition class) whose purpose is to animate visual nodes in your application. JavaFX also contains many builder classes that provide the ability to express a user interface in a declarative-style. In addition, JavaFX has a powerful property binding capability in which properties may be bound to expressions to automatically keep them updated.”

Read the article here.

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