Wednesday Jul 17, 2013

And The Winners Are.... the most popular articles on otn

Here is a list of the most popular articles, in terms of traffic, on otn/java in the last 12 months. It's, as usual, a rich mix of Java and Java-related technologies, types of articles and variety of authors.

Check out any that you might have missed and vote with your visit.


1.  “Getting Started with Java® SE Embedded on the Raspberry Pi" by Bill Courington and Gary Collins August 2012

2. “How to Get Started (FAST!) with JavaFX 2 and Scene Builder”  by Mark Heckler  November 2012

3. “Arun Gupta on Higher Productivity from Embracing HTML5 with Java EE 7”  by Janice J. Heiss  February 2013

4. “Java Experts on the State of Java” by Janice J. Heiss   January 2013

5. “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” by Adam Bien  April 2013

6. “Coding on Crete: An Interview with Java Specialist Heinz Kabutz” by Janice J. Heiss     January 2013  http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/java/heinzkabutz-1899134.html

7. “Why, Where, and How JavaFX Makes Sense”  by Björn Müller  March 2013

8. “The Advent of Kotlin: A Conversation with JetBrains' Andrey Breslav”  by Janice J. Heiss  April 2013

9. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX”  by Adam Bien   June 2012

10. “JSR 356, Java API for WebSocket”  by Johan Vos  April 2013

And here are five runners up.

11. “Introducing Groovy”  by Jim Driscoll  July 2012

12. “The Enterprise Side of JavaFX: Part Two”  by Adam Bien  June 2012

13. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML” by James L. Weaver  June 2012

14. “JavaOne 2012 Review: Make the Future Java” by Steve Meloan  October 2012

15. “Expressing the UI for Enterprise Applications with JavaFX 2.0 FXML - Part Two”  By James L. Weaver  September 2012

Thursday Jul 11, 2013

New Java Tutorials

Three new tutorials are now available on the Oracle Learning Library:
- New Java EE 7 tutorials and videos show how to create an application that uses the WebSocket API for real-time communication between a client and a server.
- Java SE tutorial on how the built-in Java™ security features protect you from malevolent programs

The Oracle Learning Library (OLL) is a repository of free online learning content covering Java technologies. The content ranges from videos, tutorials, articles, demos, step-by-step instructions to accomplish a specific task to in-depth, self-paced interactive learning modules. The content is developed by Oracle developers as well as trusted community members. New content is uploaded daily. 

The OLL have many features that include:
- Collections: groups of content that includes OLL content items, related training, and external links. You can choose to share your collection with others or keep your collections private. 
- My Library: A feature that helps you track all of the content that you have read, create bookmarks, and track the feedback and reviews you've created.
- OLL-Live: FREE, one-hour interactive webcasts from Oracle. At an OLL Live webcasts, you will experience an information packed session led by an Oracle expert showing you ways you can use Oracle products.

Wednesday Jul 03, 2013

Devoxx Belgium - CFP Closes On July 5th

The biggest Java conference in Europe is taking place in Antwerp, Belgium from November 11 to 15, 2013. The conference is designed by developers for developers and attracts renowned international speakers.

The review committee looks for passionate speakers who are technically knowledgeable and not afraid to speak in front of a full room of Devoxxians.

The speakers can increase CFP acceptance rate by submitting one or more talks for Tools in Action, Quickie, BOF, University session, Conference and Hands On Labs sessions.

Thursday Jun 27, 2013

An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7

Up on otn/java is a new article by Oracle senior software engineer Mahesh Kannan, titled “An Overview of Batch Processing in Java EE 7.0,” which explains the new batch processing capabilities provided by JSR 352 in Java EE 7. Kannan explains that “Batch processing is used in many industries for tasks ranging from payroll processing; statement generation; end-of-day jobs such as interest calculation and ETL (extract, load, and transform) in a data warehouse; and many more. Typically, batch processing is bulk-oriented, non-interactive, and long running—and might be data- or computation-intensive. Batch jobs can be run on schedule or initiated on demand. Also, since batch jobs are typically long-running jobs, check-pointing and restarting are common features found in batch jobs.”

JSR 352 defines the programming model for batch applications plus a runtime to run and manage batch jobs. The article covers feature highlights, selected APIs, the structure of Job Scheduling Language, and explains some of the key functions of JSR 352 using a simple payroll processing application. The article also describes how developers can run batch applications using GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.0.

Kannan summarizes the article as follows:

“In this article, we saw how to write, package, and run simple batch applications that use chunk-style steps. We also saw how the checkpoint feature of the batch runtime allows for the easy restart of failed batch jobs. Yet, we have barely scratched the surface of JSR 352. With the full set of Java EE components and features at your disposal, including servlets, EJB beans, CDI beans, EJB automatic timers, and so on, feature-rich batch applications can be written fairly easily.”

Check out the article here.

Thursday Jun 06, 2013

A Java EE 7 Sneak Peek!

Next week, Wednesday the 12th, Oracle executives and technical experts will present the ins and outs of Java EE 7 in a live webcast

In this presentation, technical expert Arun Gupta gives a preview of the new and updated JSRs in Java EE 7. He also lays out the plans for Java EE 8. 

Join us for the live webcast: Introducing Java EE 7 on June 12th, 2013. It is free! 

Friday May 31, 2013

Security and Java!

In a detailed blog, Nandini Ramani, Vice President of Software Development, summarizes Oracle steps to address security issues on the Java platform. Amongst the most recent changes,  she explains that "it is now possible to run signed applets without allowing them to run outside the sandbox, and users can prevent the execution of any applets if they are not signed". She lists the impacts of those changes and mentioned for example that "Oracle urges organizations whose sites currently contain unsigned Java Applets to sign those Applets according to the documented recommendations."  

She also explains that "Oracle has found that the public coverage of the recently published vulnerabilities impacting Java in the browser has caused concern to organizations committed to Java applications running on servers.  As a result, Oracle is taking steps to address the security implications of the wide Java distribution model, by further dissociating client/browser use of Java (e.g., affecting home users) and server use (e.g., affecting enterprise deployments). With Java 7 update 21, Oracle has introduced a new type of Java distribution: “Server JRE.”"

She added that "starting in October 2013, Java security fixes will be released under the Oracle Critical Patch Update schedule along with all other Oracle products.  In other words, Java will now issue four annual security releases."

Check out her original blog 

Friday May 17, 2013

New Java SE Version Numbering Scheme!

The releases with new functionalities and non-security fixes also called Limited Update Releases will be numbered in multiples of 20. The Critical Patch Updates (CPUs) will be calculated by adding multiples of five to the prior Limited Update and when needed adding one to keep the resulting number odd.

As an example: The next Limited Update for JDK 7 will be numbered 7u40, and the next 3 CPUs after that will be numbered 7u45, 7u51, and 7u55. The next release will be a Limited Update 7u60, followed by CPUs 7u65, 7u71, and 7u75.

This new version system will apply to JDK 5, JDK 6 and JDK 7 which are available on OTN Java SE Download page and Java.com

The change will: 
  • assign a fix/enhancement to a specific release in the bug systems. 
  • prevent the existing code from breaking. the versions will follow the format 7u44 and will not allow 7u44-2 for example.
  • leave “space” between planned releases for any potential unplanned ones. 

Monday May 06, 2013

Want to be in the Java Magazine?

Writing a Fix This code challenge is the easiest way to get published in Java Magazine. Give readers the chance to flex their brain muscles, have fun, and learn something new.

Java Magazine reaches more than 150,000 subscribers and is loaded with technical articles, community news, and success stories from an array of businesses. The magazine's success is the result of the expert writers who write about technologies that they have first hand experience with.

Pick a topic you are most familiar with and send as many code challenges as you want. The challenge can be about any Java technology, whether it is Java SE, Java EE, Java ME, or Java Embedded.

Submit a Fix This challenge today!  Just follow these simple steps:   

1. State the problem, including a short summary of the tool/technique, in about 75 words.

2. Send us the code snippet, with a short set-up so readers know what they are looking at (such as, "Consider the following piece of code to have database access within a Servlet.")

3. Provide four multiple-choice answers to the question, "What's the fix?"

4. Give us the answer, along with a brief explanation of why.

5. Tell us who you are (name, occupation, etc.)

6. Email the above to JAVAMAG_US at ORACLE.COM with "Fix This Submission" in the title.

Monday Apr 29, 2013

JSR 356, Java API for WebSocket

A new article, now up on otn/java, by Java Champion Johan Vos, titled “JSR 356, Java API for WebSocket,” shows developers how to integrate WebSockets into their applications. JSR 356, part of the Java EE 7 platform, specifies the API that Java developers can use when they want to integrate WebSockets into their applications on both on the Java server and client side. The API is highly flexible, and frees developers to write WebSocket-based applications independent of the underlying WebSocket implementation, thus preventing vendor lock in. It also allows for more choice in libraries and application servers. Web clients or native clients leveraging any WebSocket implementation can more easily communicate with a Java back end.

As part of the Java EE 7 standard, all Java EE 7-compliant application servers will have an implementation of the WebSocket protocol that adheres to JSR 356. Vos explains:

“Once they are established, WebSocket client and server peers are symmetrical. The difference between a client API and a server API is, therefore, minimal. JSR 356 defines a Java client API as well, which is a subset of the full API required in Java EE 7….

The Java API for WebSocket is very powerful, because it allows any Java object to be sent or received as a WebSocket message.

Basically, there are three different types of messages:

* Text-based messages
* Binary messages
* Pong messages, which are about the WebSocket connection itself

When using the interface-driven model, each session can register at most one MessageHandler for each of these three different types of messages.

When using the annotation-driven model, for each different type of message, one @onMessage annotated method is allowed. The allowed parameters for specifying the message content in the annotated methods are dependent on the type of the message.”

Check out the article here and learn how to integrate WebSockets into your applications.

Monday Apr 08, 2013

Technical Article: Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” is up on otn/java. The article demonstrates how Java EE 7 with JAX-RS 2.0 has several new useful features which further simplify development, and lead to the creation of more sophisticated Java SE/EE RESTful applications.

Using a Java-friendly, but simplistic JAX-RS 2.0 example Bien takes the reader through aspects, request interception, client and configuration issues and much more. He concludes the article as follows:

“Interestingly, JAX-RS does not even require a full-fledged application server. After fulfilling the specified Context Types, a JAX-RS 2.0–compliant API can be anything. However, the combination with EJB 3.2 brings asynchronous processing, pooling (and so throttling), and monitoring. Tight integration with Servlet 3+ comes with efficient asynchronous processing of @Suspended responses through AsyncContext support and CDI runtime brings eventing. Also Bean Validation is well integrated and can be used for validation of resource parameters. Using JAX-RS 2.0 together with other Java EE 7 APIs brings the most convenient (=no configuration) and most productive (=no re-invention) way of exposing objects to remote systems.”

Check out the article here.

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