Friday Nov 18, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 at Devoxx 2011

JavaFX had a big presence at Devoxx 2011 as witnessed by the number of sessions this year given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers.

  •     “JavaFX 2.0 -- A Java Developer's Guide” by Java Champions Stephen Chin and Peter Pilgrim
  •     “JavaFX 2.0 Hands On” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “Animation Bringing your User Interfaces to Life” by Michael Heinrichs and John Yoong (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Complete Guide to Writing Custom Bindings in JavaFX 2.0” by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “Java Rich Clients with JavaFX 2.0” by Jasper Potts and Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Properties & Bindings for Experts” (and those who want to become experts) by Michael Heinrichs (JavaFX development team)
  •     “JavaFX Under the Hood” by Richard Bair
  •     “JavaFX Open Mic” with Jasper Potts and Richard Bair


With the release of JavaFX 2.0 and Oracle’s move towards an open development model with an open bug database already created, it’s a great time for developers to take the JavaFX plunge.


One Devoxx attendee, Mark Stephens, a developer at IDRsolutions blogged about a problem he was having setting up JavaFX on NetBeans to work on his Mac. He wrote:


“I’ve tried desperate measures (I even read and reread the instructions) but it did not help. Luckily, I am at Devoxx at the moment and there seem to be a lot of JavaFX gurus here (and it is running on all their Macs). So I asked them… It turns out that sometimes the software does not automatically pickup the settings like it should do if you give it the JavaFX SDK path. The solution is actually really simple (isn’t it always once you know). Enter these values manually and it will work.”


He simply entered certain values and his problem was solved. He thanked Java Champion Stephen Chin, “for a great talk at Devoxx and putting me out of my misery.”


JavaFX in Java Magazine

Over in the November/December 2011 issue of Java Magazine, Oracle’s Simon Ritter, well known for his creative Java inventions at JavaOne, has an article up titled “JavaFX and Swing Integration” in which he shows developers how to use the power of JavaFX to migrate Swing interfaces to JavaFX. The consensus among JavaFX experts is that JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform.


In the same issue Java Champion and JavaFX maven James Weaver has an article, “Using Transitions for Animation in JavaFX 2.0”. In addition, Oracle’s Vice President of Java Client Development, Nandini Ramani, provides the keys to unlock the mysteries of JavaFX 2.0 in her Java Magazine interview.


Look for the JavaFX community to grow and flourish in coming years.

Blog Buzz - Devoxx 2011

Some day I will make it to Devoxx – for now, I’m content to vicariously follow the blogs of attendees and pick up on what’s happening.  I’ve been doing more blog "fishing," looking for the best commentary on 2011 Devoxx. There’s plenty of food for thought – and the ideas are not half-baked.

The bloggers are out in full, offering useful summaries and commentary on Devoxx goings-on.

Constantin Partac, a Java developer and a member of Transylvania JUG, a community from Cluj-Napoca/Romania, offers an excellent summary of the Devoxx keynotes.

Here’s a sample:

“Oracle Opening Keynote and JDK 7, 8, and 9 Presentation
•    Oracle is committed to Java and wants to provide support for it on any device.
•    JSE 7 for Mac will be released next week.
•    Oracle would like Java developers to be involved in JCP, to adopt a JSR and to attend local JUG meetings.
•    JEE 7 will be released next year.
•    JEE 7 is focused on cloud integration, some of the features are already implemented in glassfish 4 development branch.
•    JSE 8 will be release in summer of 2013 due to “enterprise community request” as they can not keep the pace with an 18    month release cycle.
•    The main features included in JSE8 are lambda support, project Jigsaw, new Date/Time API, project Coin++ and adding   support for sensors.

JSE 9 probably will focus on some of these features:
1.    self tuning JVM
2.    improved native language integration
3.    processing enhancement for big data
4.    reification (adding runtime class type info for generic types)
5.    unification of primitive and corresponding object classes
6.    meta-object protocol in order to use type and methods define in other JVM languages
7.    multi-tenancy
8.    JVM resource management”

Thanks Constantin!

Ivan St. Ivanov, of SAP Labs Bulgaria, also commented on the keynotes with a different focus.  He summarizes Henrik Stahl’s look ahead to Java SE 8 and JavaFX 3.0; Cameron Purdy on Java EE and the cloud; celebrated Java Champion Josh Bloch on what’s good and bad about Java; Mark Reinhold’s quick look ahead to Java SE 9; and Brian Goetz on lambdas and default methods in Java SE 8.

Here’s St. Ivanov’s account of Josh Bloch’s comments on the pluses of Java:

“He started with the virtues of the platform. To name a few:

    Tightly specified language primitives and evaluation order – int is always 32 bits and operations are executed always from left  to right, without compilers messing around
    Dynamic linking – when you change a class, you need to recompile and rebuild just the jar that has it and not the whole application
    Syntax  similarity with C/C++ – most existing developers at that time felt like at home
    Object orientations – it was cool at that time as well as functional programming is today
    It was statically typed language – helps in faster runtime, better IDE support, etc.
    No operator overloading – well, I’m not sure why it is good. Scala has it for example and that’s why it is far better for defining DSLs. But I will not argue with Josh.”

It’s worth checking out St. Ivanov’s summary of Bloch’s views on what’s not so great about Java as well.

What's Coming in JAX-RS 2.0

Marek Potociar, Principal Software Engineer at Oracle and currently specification lead of Java EE RESTful web services API (JAX-RS), blogged on his talk about what's coming in JAX-RS 2.0, scheduled for final release in mid-2012.  

Here’s a taste:

“Perhaps the most wanted addition to the JAX-RS is the Client API, that would complete the JAX-RS story, that is currently server-side only. In JAX-RS 2.0 we are adding a completely interface-based and fluent client API that blends nicely in with the existing fluent response builder pattern on the server-side. When we started with the client API, the first proposal contained around 30 classes. Thanks to the feedback from our Expert Group we managed to reduce the number of API classes to 14 (2 of them being exceptions)! The resulting is compact while at the same time we still managed to create an API that reflects the method invocation context flow (e.g. once you decide on the target URI and start setting headers on the request, your IDE will not try to offer you a URI setter in the code completion). This is a subtle but very important usability aspect of an API…”

Obviously, Devoxx is a great Java conference, one that is hitting this year at a time when much is brewing in the platform and beginning to be anticipated.


Wednesday Nov 16, 2011

The Big Announcement, This Year, at Devoxx 2011!

Stephan Janssen started the developer conference with his traditional "Welcome and Announcements" and this year announced Devoxx France, the new and only Devoxx conference outside of Belgium. It will take place in Paris, April 18 to 20, 2012. The Paris Java user group is organizing the 3 day conference. The conference is designed after Devoxx with Tools in Action, Labs, BOFs and Quickies and with one university day and 2 conference days. The model works well since Stephan turns down attendees every year. The content will be 75% in French and 25% in English. Call for papers opened today. Oracle will be a sponsor at the event!

Tuesday Oct 18, 2011

"Looking Back on JavaOne 2011" feature article

A JavaOne “afterglow” article, “Looking Back on JavaOne 2011” is up on otn/java. The article reviews the spirit, highlights, and feel of the 2011 JavaOne Conference.

From the article itself:

“It was at times difficult to take in all that has been achieved in the last year. The announcements at this year’s JavaOne came fast and furious -- the summer release of JDK 7 (including preview release for Mac OS X), the debut of JavaFX 2.0 (Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications), and ongoing progress on Java EE 7 (including taking Java EE into the Cloud). Meanwhile, at Monday’s Technical Keynote, it was pointed out that there are now 5 billion Java Cards in the world --contrasted with a global population of 6.5 billion. And then Tuesday’s Strategy Keynote brought Oracle’s announcement that it will open source JavaFX -- first the components, and then the rest of the framework -- as soon as there is approval from the OpenJDK community. And all the while, the OpenJDK community continues to grow, with recent members including IBM, Apple, SAP, and Twitter.”

Read the complete article.

JavaOne 2011 Recap

The 2011 JavaOne Conference, the sixteenth, had its own distinctive identity. The Conference theme, “Moving Java Forward,” coincided with the spirit that seemed to pervade the attendees – after more than a year-and-a-half of stewardship over Java, there was a clear and reassuring feeling that Oracle was doing its part to support Java and the Java community. Attendees that I spoke to felt that the conference was well put together and that the Java platform was being well served and indeed, moving forward.

For me, personally, it was a week in which my feet barely touched the ground as I rushed through tours from session to laptop to session, dashing off blogs and racing back to events, socials, awards ceremonies, BOF's and more.

The Keynotes

Start with the keynotes. Monday’s Technical Keynote debuted and open-sourced JavaFX 2.0, looked ahead to Java EE on the cloud and reminded us that there are about 6.5 billion people in the world and five billion Java Cards.

Tuesday’s Java Strategy Keynote offered Oracle's long-term vision for investment and innovation in Java.

Thursday’s Java Community Keynote while touched by the awareness of Steve Jobs’ passing, celebrated Java User Groups, Duke’s Choice and JCP award winners, and was capped off with the inimitable Java Posse.

Sessions, Sessions, and more Sessions

And then there were the sessions!

JavaFX 2.0, which was represented in more than 50 sessions, deserves special mention.

There was a lively panel discussion of the future of Java EE and the cloud.

Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter, in his session, showed off a fun gadget that worked via JavaFX 2.0.

Oracle’s Greg Bollella and Eric Jensen, gave a session titled “Telemetry and Synchronization with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB” that presented a vision of the potential future of Cyber-Physical Systems

Java Champion Michael Hüttermann explained best Agile ALM practices in a session.

Oracle’s Joseph Darcy took developers deeper into the heads and tails of Project Coin.

A JCP panel talked about JCP.next and the future of the JCP.

The JCP Awards gave recognition to some well-deserving people.

Oracle’s Kelly O’Hair gave a session on OpenJDK development best practices.

Oracle’s Terrence Barr showed developers how to get started with Embedded Java(http://blogs.oracle.com/javaone/entry/getting_started_with_embedded_java).

The Duke's Choice Awards reminded us of the sheer ingenuity of Java and Java developers.

Adam Bien, Java Champion, Java Rock Star and winner of Oracle Magazine’s ninth annual Editors' Choice award as Java Developer of the Year was all over the place.

Go to Parley’s.com to take in some of the great sessions.
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