Tuesday Oct 18, 2011

JavaOne 2011 Recap

The 2011 JavaOne Conference, the sixteenth, had its own distinctive identity. The Conference theme, “Moving Java Forward,” coincided with the spirit that seemed to pervade the attendees – after more than a year-and-a-half of stewardship over Java, there was a clear and reassuring feeling that Oracle was doing its part to support Java and the Java community. Attendees that I spoke to felt that the conference was well put together and that the Java platform was being well served and indeed, moving forward.

For me, personally, it was a week in which my feet barely touched the ground as I rushed through tours from session to laptop to session, dashing off blogs and racing back to events, socials, awards ceremonies, BOF's and more.

The Keynotes

Start with the keynotes. Monday’s Technical Keynote debuted and open-sourced JavaFX 2.0, looked ahead to Java EE on the cloud and reminded us that there are about 6.5 billion people in the world and five billion Java Cards.

Tuesday’s Java Strategy Keynote offered Oracle's long-term vision for investment and innovation in Java.

Thursday’s Java Community Keynote while touched by the awareness of Steve Jobs’ passing, celebrated Java User Groups, Duke’s Choice and JCP award winners, and was capped off with the inimitable Java Posse.

Sessions, Sessions, and more Sessions

And then there were the sessions!

JavaFX 2.0, which was represented in more than 50 sessions, deserves special mention.

There was a lively panel discussion of the future of Java EE and the cloud.

Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter, in his session, showed off a fun gadget that worked via JavaFX 2.0.

Oracle’s Greg Bollella and Eric Jensen, gave a session titled “Telemetry and Synchronization with Embedded Java and Berkeley DB” that presented a vision of the potential future of Cyber-Physical Systems

Java Champion Michael Hüttermann explained best Agile ALM practices in a session.

Oracle’s Joseph Darcy took developers deeper into the heads and tails of Project Coin.

A JCP panel talked about JCP.next and the future of the JCP.

The JCP Awards gave recognition to some well-deserving people.

Oracle’s Kelly O’Hair gave a session on OpenJDK development best practices.

Oracle’s Terrence Barr showed developers how to get started with Embedded Java(http://blogs.oracle.com/javaone/entry/getting_started_with_embedded_java).

The Duke's Choice Awards reminded us of the sheer ingenuity of Java and Java developers.

Adam Bien, Java Champion, Java Rock Star and winner of Oracle Magazine’s ninth annual Editors' Choice award as Java Developer of the Year was all over the place.

Go to Parley’s.com to take in some of the great sessions.

Monday Oct 17, 2011

JavaFX 2.0 Arrives and is Open Sourced

JavafxAmong the big news at JavaOne 2011 was the release of JavaFX 2.0 and announcement of its open source status. As Oracle’s Chief Architect, Client Java Platform Richard Bair observed, “We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.” JavaFX 2.0, touted as the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform, is designed to provide a modern Java environment that shortens development time and eases the deployment of data driven-business and enterprise client applications.

 

Its key features include:

 

• Java APIs for JavaFX

 

• FXML -- an XML-based markup language for defining user interfaces

 

• Seamless integration into Swing applications

 

• High-performance hardware accelerated graphics

 

• Embedding of web content into JavaFX

 

• High-performance media engine

 

• Improved UI controls library

 

JavaFX 2.0 enables developers to leverage their existing Java skills and tools to develop JavaFX applications. It offers a clean separation of application UI and logic and simplifies code maintenance while integrating Web content and media seamlessly in Java applications. Developers can more easily create scalable, graphics-rich applications without performance penalties, build sophisticated user interfaces, extend existing Swing applications, and deploy applications in the browser, as desktop, or Web Start applications.

 

Java APIs for JavaFX include:

 

• End-to-end Java development

 

• Java language features—generics, annotations, multi-threading

 

• Reduced static footprint of runtime and applications

 

• Fluent API design for UI construction

 

• Development in alternative languages (e.g., JRuby, Groovy) with JavaFX

 

• Leverage sophisticated Java IDEs, debuggers and profilers

 

• Java APIs preserve convenient JavaFX Script features (e.g., bind)

 

Other features to take note of in JavaFX 2.0:

 

FXML

 

• Scriptable, XML-based markup language for defining user interfaces

 

• Convenient alternative to developing UI programmatically in Java

 

• Easy to learn and intuitive for developers familiar with web technologies or other markup based UI technologies

 

• Powerful scripting feature allows embedding scripts within a FXML file. Any JVM scripting language can be used, including JavaScript, Groovy, and Clojure, among others

 

New Graphics Pipeline for Modern GPUs

 

• New hardware accelerated graphics pipeline (Prism)

 

• New windowing toolkit (Glass) for Prism

 

• Java2D software pipeline for unsupported graphics hardware

 

• High-level support for making rich graphics simple: Shadows, Blurs, Reflections, Effects, 2D and 3D transforms

 

 

Rich Set of UI Controls

 

• Over 50 components for form-based UI, including charts, layout and form controls

 

• CSS3+ skinning and layout of UI controls

 

• Advanced UI controls, including table, tree view, rich text editor

 

 

Web Component

 

• Embed Web content in JavaFX applications

 

• HTML and JavaScript rendering based on Webkit

 

• DOM access and manipulation from Java

 

 

Browser Plug-in Refreshed for JavaFX 2.0

 

• Loading of JavaFX applets based on Prism

 

• Preloader for JavaFX applets for improved user experience

 

 

Powerful Properties Model

 

• New collections ObservableList, Sequence and ObservableMap

 

• New design and implementation of bean properties

 

• Low level binding API for high performance, low footprint bindings

 

• High level binding API for simple usage

 

 

Improved Animation Engine

 

• Optimized implementation of transitions

 

• Complete overhaul of API to simplify usage and in preparation of optimized and more stable implementation

 

 

Approximately 50 JavaFX 2.0 sessions can be found at JavaOne given by leading JavaFX movers and shakers. JavaFX is the next step in the evolution of Java as a rich client platform. Congratulations to all involved!  


Interfacing with the Interface: JavaFX 2.0, Wiimote, Kinect, and More

Oracle’s Java Technology Evangelist Simon Ritter, one of the most fun-loving Java developers I know, with a long history of JavaOne gadgetry, gave a session (25011) at JavaOne 2011 on Wednesday afternoon showing how “open source APIs for the Kinect, the Wiimote combined with a tilt-compensated compass, a head-mounted stereoscopic display, and some old Sun SPOTs can build a truly immersive application.” The large audience appeared immersed throughout the session in Ritter's colorful and clearly delineated demos.

Simon RitterHe explained that the way we interact with computers is rapidly changing and that the days of the keyboard and mouse are gone. (Maybe so, but I'm sitting here using a keyboard and mouse.) And with his usual dramatic flair, Ritter invited attendees to behold the rise of something he calls the “gestural interface”.

The presentation used the latest JavaFX 2.0 "pure Java" implementation and began with an overview of the different components being used and explained how they are all brought together to enable the user to interact with interfaces in ways never before possible. Building an interface with the new JavaFX 2.0, Simon pointed out, is a continuation of the JavaFX product line, which is now a Java API with no scripting language and most APIs ported across while features such as binding and animation have required more thought. JavaFX now embraces more web technologies and enables the use of CSS for all JavaFX controls and a web specification for Drag-and-Drop. Also, developers use Scenegraph instead of DOM. He pointed to both pro’s and con’s of using JavaFX with gestural interfaces. On the plus side, it has built-in features such as data binding and animations, is a relatively simple API, and is able to build rich, visually appealing interfaces. On the negative side, JavaFX is currently limited to a 2D environment. The engineering team is currently working on 3D support.

He contrasted this with jMonkey Engine (jME), a game engine made especially for modern 3D development, written purely in Java and consisting of a collection of libraries that has game engine facilities and a full physics engine, but is hard to program and focuses on games and not generic interfaces. Ritter proceeded to demonstrate how to use the Nintendo Wiimote with a Java interface. The Wiimote communicates using a Bluetooth stack that needs to support L2CAP, has JSR-82 Java Bluetooth API implementation plus Wiimote-specific Java APIs (IR sensors, accelerometer, etc), most of which is free and open source.

He then presented a demo making use of the Sun Spot controller, a gyro sensor for precise rotation data, three bend sensors for finger movement for head tracking and data gloves, hand and head tracking sensors and hardware and more.

This followed with a demo using the Kinect Sensor with Java for 3D sensing. Not to be lost are his larger points: Java is still a really cool and powerful language. It is easy to interface with exotic hardware using free and open source libraries to build interesting applications using modern hardware.

After a brief Q&A, Simon -- as he always does -- implored attendees to be inspired and go build their own FUN stuff.

Evolutionary Next-Steps - Technical Keynote JavaOne 2011

Monday morning's Technical Keynote began with Doug Fisher, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Software and Services Group’s System Software Division, Intel. Fisher and a number of Intel colleagues reviewed Intel’s long association with Java, and their collaborative work with Oracle to optimize the Java platform (for both the JVM and Fusion Middleware) on Intel hardware.


From there, Ashok Joshi, Senior Director of Development NoSQL Database, briefly discussed performance tuning with Intel of the newly announced Oracle NoSQL Database product.

From Evolution to Revolution: Java 7 to Java 8

Following Joshi, Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle, reviewed the history of Java 7, and its “Plan B” paradigm of including Project Coin (JSR 334), InvokeDynamic (JSR 292), and the Fork/Join Framework in the just-released Java 7, while incorporating Project Jigsaw and Project Lambda in the upcoming Java 8. Reinhold then explored the evolutionary benefits of these key new features of the Java 7 release -- offering both greater ease of development, and significant performance benefits. “Not only are these features available in Java 7 today,” noted Reinhold, “but as of last week, they are now supported in all three of the major Java IDEs.”

Reinhold next detailed plans for the upcoming Java 8 release, which promises more revolutionary features beyond the evolutionary offerings of Java 7. Project Lambda (JSR 335) will bring closures to the Java programming language. And Project Jigsaw (JSR TBD) aims to define a standard module system -- not just for application code, but for the platform itself.

JavaFX 2.0 is Here!

Richard Bair, Chief Architect, Client Java Platform, Oracle, then dove into the official debut of JavaFX 2.0, along with some stunning demos of the new facility, presented by several colleagues. Java FX 2.0 is Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications. Bair emphasized that JavaFX 2.0 was designed to offer:

Cross Platform
Leverage Java
Advanced Tooling
Developer Productivity
Amazing User Interfaces.

“We naturally want user interfaces that look good and work well,” said Bair. “It used to be just eye candy, but now it’s becoming a required feature for the things we write. We’re announcing today the general availability of JavaFX 2.0, at JavaFX.com. We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.”

An important aspect of any UI technology is a good visual development tool, and Bair next announced early access for the JavaFX Scene Builder, which will first be made available to select partners, then expanded to a general beta, and then a full release. But for those at JavaOne, an early build of the tool will be running and available for demo at the DEMOgrounds.

A series of stunning demos -- several of them BSD licensed caused much enthusiasm -- then took JavaFX 2.0 out for a spin, and clearly showed the possibilities and potentials of the new release -- including animated 3D audio EQ mapping, and a navigable 3D virtual room that featured live video of Oracle colleague Jasper Potts displayed on a wall monitor, along with real-time mimicking of Potts’ movements by a virtual Java Duke figure.

Bair noted that there are over 50 JavaFX sessions at JavaOne, and said that for anyone who attended all of them -- “I’ll buy you dinner!”

Moving Java EE into the Cloud

From there, Linda DeMichiel, Java EE 7 Specification Lead, explored the upcoming Java EE 7 release. “What’s new with the Java EE platform?” asked DeMichiel. “We’re moving Java EE into the Cloud. Our focus on this release is providing support for Platform as a Service. We want to provide a way for customers and users of the platform to leverage public, private and hybrid clouds. With Java EE 7, our focus is on the platform itself as a service, which can be leveraged in cloud environments.”

DeMichiel’s colleague, Arun Gupta, then demonstrated deployment of a Java EE application as a PaaS, using Glassfish 4.0. Both the application and instructions on how to replicate the demo are available online.

More Java Cards than People?

Lastly, Hinkmond Wong, of Oracle’s Java Embedded group, covered the latest in mobile and embedded Java, noting the three billion Java enabled phones and five billion Java Cards in the world today. “There are about 6.5 billion people in the world,” noted Wong, “and five billion Java Cards.”

2011 saw the introduction of Near Field Communication (NFC) payment system, including e-Passport in Java ME, allowing for mobile-to-mobile and machine-to-machine transactions with embedded security. Wong detailed the many new Java ME releases for 2011, along with several mobile and embedded technology demos—from cell phones to Blu-ray players.

The overflow crowd left the opening technical keynote energized – a real good start to this JavaOne!

Learn More:

Java 7 Features

Java SE 7 Features and Enhancements

A Look at Java 7's New Features

Contribute to JDK 8

JavaFX Homepage

JavaFX Overview

Java EE at a Glance

Java for Mobile Devices

Oracle NoSQL Database

Oracle Technology Network for Java Developers

Monday Oct 03, 2011

Evolutionary Next-Steps - Technical Keynote JavaOne 2011

Monday morning's Technical Keynote began with Doug Fisher, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Software and Services Group’s System Software Division, Intel. Fisher and a number of Intel colleagues reviewed Intel’s long association with Java, and their collaborative work with Oracle to optimize the Java platform (for both the JVM and Fusion Middleware) on Intel hardware.

From there, Ashok Joshi, Senior Director of Development NoSQL Database, briefly discussed performance tuning with Intel of the newly announced Oracle NoSQL Database product.

From Evolution to Revolution: Java 7 to Java 8

Following Joshi, Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle, reviewed the history of Java 7, and its “Plan B” paradigm of including Project Coin (JSR 334), InvokeDynamic (JSR 292), and the Fork/Join Framework in the just-released Java 7, while incorporating Project Jigsaw and Project Lambda in the upcoming Java 8. Reinhold then explored the evolutionary benefits of these key new features of the Java 7 release -- offering both greater ease of development, and significant performance benefits. “Not only are these features available in Java 7 today,” noted Reinhold, “but as of last week, they are now supported in all three of the major Java IDEs.”

Reinhold next detailed plans for the upcoming Java 8 release, which promises more revolutionary features beyond the evolutionary offerings of Java 7. Project Lambda (JSR 335) will bring closures to the Java programming language. And Project Jigsaw (JSR TBD) aims to define a standard module system -- not just for application code, but for the platform itself.

JavaFX 2.0 is Here!

Richard Bair, Chief Architect, Client Java Platform, Oracle, then dove into the official debut of JavaFX 2.0, along with some stunning demos of the new facility, presented by several colleagues. Java FX 2.0 is Oracle’s premier development environment for rich client applications. Bair emphasized that JavaFX 2.0 was designed to offer:

Cross Platform
Leverage Java
Advanced Tooling
Developer Productivity
Amazing User Interfaces.

“We naturally want user interfaces that look good and work well,” said Bair. “It used to be just eye candy, but now it’s becoming a required feature for the things we write. We’re announcing today the general availability of JavaFX 2.0, at JavaFX.com. We think this is going to be a really big deal in the industry.”

An important aspect of any UI technology is a good visual development tool, and Bair next announced early access for the JavaFX Scene Builder, which will first be made available to select partners, then expanded to a general beta, and then a full release. But for those at JavaOne, an early build of the tool will be running and available for demo at the DEMOgrounds.

A series of stunning demos -- several of them BSD licensed caused much enthusiasm -- then took JavaFX 2.0 out for a spin, and clearly showed the possibilities and potentials of the new release -- including animated 3D audio EQ mapping, and a navigable 3D virtual room that featured live video of Oracle colleague Jasper Potts displayed on a wall monitor, along with real-time mimicking of Potts’ movements by a virtual Java Duke figure.

Bair noted that there are over 50 JavaFX sessions at JavaOne, and said that for anyone who attended all of them -- “I’ll buy you dinner!”

Moving Java EE into the Cloud

From there, Linda DeMichiel, Java EE 7 Specification Lead, explored the upcoming Java EE 7 release. “What’s new with the Java EE platform?” asked DeMichiel. “We’re moving Java EE into the Cloud. Our focus on this release is providing support for Platform as a Service. We want to provide a way for customers and users of the platform to leverage public, private and hybrid clouds. With Java EE 7, our focus is on the platform itself as a service, which can be leveraged in cloud environments.”

DeMichiel’s colleague, Arun Gupta, then demonstrated deployment of a Java EE application as a PaaS, using Glassfish 4.0. Both the application and instructions on how to replicate the demo are available online.

More Java Cards than People?

Lastly, Hinkmond Wong, of Oracle’s Java Embedded group, covered the latest in mobile and embedded Java, noting the three billion Java enabled phones and five billion Java Cards in the world today. “There are about 6.5 billion people in the world,” noted Wong, “and five billion Java Cards.”

2011 saw the introduction of Near Field Communication (NFC) payment system, including e-Passport in Java ME, allowing for mobile-to-mobile and machine-to-machine transactions with embedded security. Wong detailed the many new Java ME releases for 2011, along with several mobile and embedded technology demos—from cell phones to Blu-ray players.

The overflow crowd left the opening technical keynote energized – a real good start to this JavaOne!

Learn More:

Java 7 Features:
http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk7/features/

Java SE 7 Features and Enhancements:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/jdk7-relnotes-418459.html

A Look at Java 7's New Features:
http://radar.oreilly.com/2011/09/java7-features.html

Contribute to JDK 8:
http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk8/
http://jdk8.java.net/

JavaFX:
http://javafx.com/
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javafx/overview/index.html

Java EE at a Glance:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/overview/index.html

Java for Mobile Devices:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javame/javamobile/overview/getstarted/index.html

Oracle NoSQL Database:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/nosqldb/overview/index.html

Wednesday Sep 21, 2011

Experts from Oracle and the Community at Silicon Valley Code Camp!

Silicon Valley Code Camp (Oct. 8 & 9) is a community-driven developer conference. Developers will learn from their fellow developers in 212 sessions about code, of course, but also about legal issues, branding and community building. Experts from Oracle and the community are sharing their technical know-how during those 2 days in session formats ranging from informal discussions to presentations.

Conveniently scheduled on the weekend with a free entrance, the conference has become more popular over the years and has 1,787 registered this year. The support of many sponsors makes this conference happen and this year Oracle is a platinum sponsor.


Oracle Experts

Pieter Humphrey

In-memory session replication with WebLogic and GlassFish, Coherence 

http://blogs.oracle.com/devtools

Sun., Oct. 9 –  10:45am  

An engineer's introduction to in-memory data grid development

http://blogs.oracle.com/devtools

Sun., Oct. 9 – 9:15am


Patrick Curran

JCP and the Future of Java

http://htp://jcp.org

Sun., Oct. 9– 9:45am


Juan Camilo Ruiz

Extending the JSF controller for reusability

Sun., Oct. 9 - 2:45pm


Arun Gupta

The Java EE 7 Platform: Developing for the Cloud

http://blogs.sun.com/arungupta

Sat., Oct. 8 - 11:15am

Deploy and Monitor your Java EE 6 session in a fully-clustered GlassFish

http://blogs.sun.com/arungupta

Sat., Oct. 8 - 9:45pm


Todd Farmer

Building Java Applications for MySQL

Sun., Oct. 9h – 1:15pm


Simon Law

High-Performance SQL Applications Using In-Memory Database Technology

Sun., Oct. 9h –  10:45am

Experts from the Community

Stephen Chin

JavaFX 2.0 With Alternative Languages-

Groovy, Clojure, Scala, Fantom, and Visage

http://steveonjava.com/

Sat., Oct. 8h – 11:15am


John David Duncan

MySQL Cluster With and Without SQL

http://mysqlblog.lenoxway.net

Sat., Oct. 8h – 1:45pm


Peter Pilgrim

Progressive Enhanced JavaFX 2.0 Custom Components

http://www.xenonique.co.uk/blog/

Sat., Oct. 8th – 5:00pm


Prashant Deva

Chronon - DVR for Java

http://www.chrononsystems.com

Sat., Oct. 8h – 11:15am


Slava Imeshev

Best Practices for Scaling Java Applications

with Distributed Caching

http://www.cacheonix.com

Sun., Oct. 9h – 1:15pm


Manish Pandit

Play! as you REST : Using Play! Framework

to build RESTful services

http://twitter.com/lobster1234

Sat., Oct. 8th – 1:45pm





Thursday Aug 18, 2011

Templating with JSF 2.0 Facelets

A new article on otn/java, “Templating with JSF 2.0 Facelets,” by Deepak Vohra, offers a concise explanation of how to use Facelets, which in JavaServer Faces (JSF) 2.0, has replaced JavaServer Pages (JSP) as the default view declaration language (VDL). With Facelets, developers no longer need to configure a view handler as they once did in JSF 1.2.

From the article itself:

“Facelets is a templating framework similar to Tiles. The advantage of Facelets over Tiles is that JSF UIComponents are pre-integrated with Facelets, and Facelets does not require a Facelets configuration file, unlike Tiles, which requires a Tiles configuration file.

JSF Validators and Converters may be added to Facelets. Facelets provides a complete expression language (EL) and JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL) support. Templating, re-use, and ease of development are some of the advantages of using Facelets in a Web application.

In this article, we develop a Facelets Web application in Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse 11g and deploy the application to Oracle WebLogic Server 11g. In the Facelets application, an input text UIComponent will be added to an input Facelets page. With JSF navigation, the input Facelets page is navigated to another Facelets page, which displays the JSF data table generated from the SQL query specified in the input Facelets page. We will use Oracle Database 11g Express Edition for the data source. Templating is demonstrated by including graphics for the header and the footer in the input and the output; the graphics have to be specified only once in the template.”

Read the complete article here.

Wednesday Jul 20, 2011

Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0

A new article by Java Champion and JavaFX expert, Jim Weaver, titled “Using Transitions for Animation in Oracle’s JavaFX 2.0,” shows developers how to animate their nodes in scenes the easy way, using the JavaFX 2.0 TranslateTransition class. JavaFX comes with its own transition classes, whose purpose is to provide convenient ways to do commonly used animation tasks. The article shows how to use the TranslateTransition class to animate a node, moving it back and forth between two positions in the UI.

From the article:

“JavaFX 2.0 comes with several transition classes (that extend the Transition class) whose purpose is to animate visual nodes in your application. JavaFX also contains many builder classes that provide the ability to express a user interface in a declarative-style. In addition, JavaFX has a powerful property binding capability in which properties may be bound to expressions to automatically keep them updated.”

Read the article here.

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