Friday Dec 16, 2011

Spring to Java EE Migration, Part 2 (technical article)

In part two of a four-part article series on otn/java, “Spring to Java EE Migration, Part 2,” CTO and Java EE expert David Heffelfinger elaborates further on how easy it is to develop the data layer of an application using Java EE, JPA, and the NetBeans IDE instead of the Spring Framework.

Part 1 began with a Java EE rewrite of Spring's Pet Clinic sample application and developed the persistence layer of the application using Java Persistence API (JPA) 2.0, using NetBeans to generate most of the persistence layer from an existing database schema. Heffelfinger analyzed the generated code, which employed advanced JPA features.

In part 2, he continues this process by developing Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) 3.1 session beans that act as Data Access Objects (DAOs), as well as JavaServer Faces (JSF) 2.0 managed beans and pages. Readers get to see the generated code in action and are given a look under the hood to see what’s going on.

Heffelfinger concludes Part 2 with a look ahead to Part 3:

“In the next installment of this series, we will modify the generated code to make it a bit more user friendly and we will compare the Java EE and Spring versions of the Pet Clinic application.”

Read the complete article here.

Wednesday Nov 02, 2011

Spring to Java EE Migration

In a new article up on otn/java, the first of a series, titled “Spring to Java EE Migration, Part 1,” CTO and Java EE expert David Heffelfinger demonstrates how easy it is to develop the data layer of an application using Java EE, JPA, and the NetBeans IDE instead of the Spring Framework.

Heffelfinger observes that, “Every time I work on a Spring project, I start mumbling under my breath. I know I will have to go through long and convoluted XML files to determine what is going on with the project. I also know that my project will have approximately 10,000 dependencies and that the generated WAR file is going to be a monster.”

He contrasts this with Java EE, where most of the needed services are required by the application server, reducing the number of required dependencies, and typically Java EE provides configuration by exception, meaning there is little configuration necessary. When configuration is needed, it is usually done through annotations, which allows the developers to get the whole picture from the source code. Also, with Java EE, the advanced tooling from NetBeans is available.

Again, from the article itself:

“In this series of articles, we will rewrite the sample Pet Clinic application provided with Spring using Java EE. In this first article, I illustrate how we can quickly develop an application that has equivalent functionality to the Spring version by taking advantage of the excellent Java EE tooling provided by NetBeans. The Java EE version employs JavaServer Faces (JSF) for the user interface, Data Access Objects (DAOs) are implemented using Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) 3.1 session beans, and data access is provided by Java Persistence API (JPA) 2.0.”

Read the article in full here.
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