Wednesday Apr 10, 2013

Java on SPARC T5-8 Servers is FAST

Watching the boats practicing on San Francisco Bay for the America's Cup reminds me that fast is fun!  Did you know that Oracle just announced world record Java benchmarks with SPARC T5 and Solaris?  

The Details

Oracle produced a world record SPECjEnterprise2010 benchmark result of 57,422.17 SPECjEnterprise2010 EjOPS using Oracle's SPARC T5-8 server in the application tier and another SPARC T5-8 server for the database tier. This result demonstrated less than 1 second response time for all SPECjEnterprise2010 transactions, while demonstrating a sustained load of Java EE 5 transactions equivalent to 468,000 users. A SPARC T5-8 has 8 chips, 128 cores, and runs a 3.6 GHz SPARC T5CPU. Translation: If you get some SPARC T5-8 servers, you can run your Java applications really, really fast.

About the Benchmark

SPECjEnterprise2010 is the third generation of the SPEC organization's J2EE end-to-end industry standard benchmark application. The new SPECjEnterprise2010 benchmark has been re-designed and developed to cover the Java EE 5 specification's significantly expanded and simplified programming model, highlighting the major features used by developers in the industry today. This provides a real world workload driving the Application Server's implementation of the Java EE specification to its maximum potential and allowing maximum stressing of the underlying hardware and software systems:

  • The web zone, servlets, and web services
  • The EJB zone
  • JPA 1.0 Persistence Model
  • JMS and Message Driven Beans
  • Transaction management
  • Database connectivity

Moreover, SPECjEnterprise2010 also heavily exercises all parts of the underlying infrastructure that make up the application environment, including hardware, JVM software, database software, JDBC drivers, and the system network.

Learn More

Blog: SPARC T5-8 w/ Oracle Solaris Delivers SPECjEnterprise2010 Benchmark World Record Performance
Blog: SPARC T5-2 w/ Oracle Solaris Achieves SPECjbb2013 Benchmark World Record Result
White Paper: Oracle Solaris: The Best Platform for Enterprise Java (PDF) 
Complete Results at SPEC.org: SPECjEnterprise2010

Monday Apr 08, 2013

Technical Article: Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0

A new article by Java Champion Adam Bien, titled “Java EE 7 and JAX-RS 2.0” is up on otn/java. The article demonstrates how Java EE 7 with JAX-RS 2.0 has several new useful features which further simplify development, and lead to the creation of more sophisticated Java SE/EE RESTful applications.

Using a Java-friendly, but simplistic JAX-RS 2.0 example Bien takes the reader through aspects, request interception, client and configuration issues and much more. He concludes the article as follows:

“Interestingly, JAX-RS does not even require a full-fledged application server. After fulfilling the specified Context Types, a JAX-RS 2.0–compliant API can be anything. However, the combination with EJB 3.2 brings asynchronous processing, pooling (and so throttling), and monitoring. Tight integration with Servlet 3+ comes with efficient asynchronous processing of @Suspended responses through AsyncContext support and CDI runtime brings eventing. Also Bean Validation is well integrated and can be used for validation of resource parameters. Using JAX-RS 2.0 together with other Java EE 7 APIs brings the most convenient (=no configuration) and most productive (=no re-invention) way of exposing objects to remote systems.”

Check out the article here.

Thursday Apr 04, 2013

Golo – A Lightweight Dynamic Language for the JVM

Julien Ponge, who, in addition to being a Java developer and a professor, also writes technical articles for both otn/java and Java Magazine, has created Golo, a simple, dynamic, weakly-typed open source language that favors the explicit over the implicit. Developers can pick it up in a manner of hours, not days. Responses to its recent release at Devoxx have been favorable.

Built from day 1 with invokedynamic, and currently in beta, Golo takes advantage of the latest advances of the JVM. It is also a showcase on how to build a language runtime with invokedynamic.

The Golo Programming Guide is located here.

Julien is an Associate Professor (Maître de Conférences) in Computer Science and Engineering at INSA-Lyon in France, plus an R&D Computer Scientist at the CITI / INRIA laboratory. Learn more about him here.

Wednesday Apr 03, 2013

Introducing Kids to Java Programming Using Minecraft


By Arun Gupta, originally published on his blog

Minecraft is a wildly popular game among elementary and middle schoolers. The game allows players to build constructions of textured cubes in a 3D world.

My son has been playing the game for about a year, lets say addicted to it. Last Fall he told me that the game is corrupted because the JAR file snapshot has messed up the configuration. And that right away rang a bell in me as a Java Evangelist at Oracle.

My son has been playing the game for about a year, lets say addicted to it. Last Fall he told me that the game is corrupted because the JAR file snapshot has messed up the configuration. And that right away rang a bell in me as a Java Evangelist at Oracle.

I learned from him that the game is written in Java, has a trial version that runs as an applet in the browser, and downloaded as a JAR file for desktop. The game is modular where the players travel through a world and chunks are loaded and unloaded to keep the memory footprint small. Something unique about the game is the ability to modify the game from what it was originally designed for. In Minecraft language, this is called as a "mod" - short for modifications. For example, a mod can add new characters to the game, change look-and-feel of the play field, or make it easy to build new structures.

The game has a server and a client component. This allows the game to be played in a single player mode where a player connects to a server using a client and plays the game. Alternatively multiple players, using different clients across platforms, can connect to a server and play with each other collaboratively. Its very common to have a server run with multiple mods. There are almost an infinite number of mods someone could do to make Minecraft a more amusing game to play. There is no official API to create these mods but there are several third-party vendors that provide that capability; Bukkit is one such API. The ability to write mods and alter the game play gives players more control over the game and gets them more excited.

My son expressed his desire to write a mod and so we started exploring further. Then onwards, he started teaching me Minecraft vocabulary and I taught him the Java programming concepts. Our discussions in the car, on the dinner table, during the breakfast preparation, and elsewhere changed to reflect that as well. He already played with Scratch and Greenfoot last Summer and that was extremely helpful during this learning curve. We set up a goal to build a mod during Christmas break. After understanding the basic concepts and building a few mods, we decided to share the knowledge with a broader set of Minecrafters. And that's where the concept of doing a Minecraft Workshop was born.

My son came up with a list of his minecraft buddies and we announced a date for the workshop. Everybody invited for the workshop confirmed their presence right away. I found out that both the invited kids and their parents were equally excited. One friend could not attend because of a prior commitment and was extremely disappointed. On the day of the workshop, some kids were eager to come even before the formal start of the workshop.

The workshop was attended by 10 kids with age ranging from 10-14 years. Most of the kids had no programming experience, let alone Java. However there was high Minecraft experience in the group with some kids playing for about 2 years and up to 2 hours every day. When given the topic of Minecraft, the small group would talk excitedly about different aspects of the game, constantly using hundreds of game-specific terms and phrases as if speaking a different language. My goal was to leverage their passion and introduce them to Java programming.


The challenge for me was to introduce programming to these kids using analogies from the daily life. Using a car, features, capabilities, types, and car dealers and correlating with class, properties, methods, instances, and packages seem to work. Fruits and different methods of peeling, eating, and planting was used to introduce the concept of Interface in Java. I asked, “What can you do with a watermelon?” the first answer was obvious, “you can eat it.” The second one was a little less so, “You can chuck in a trash can.” The response was greeted with scattered laughter. I used that to explain the concept of Exceptions in Java.

kids programming

Short anecdotes and side-conversations kept the livelihood of the group going throughout the five hour programming session. There are almost an infinite number of mods someone could do to make Minecraft a more amusing game to play. But all these mods hold the same basic framework that we set up for any future work on making game-specific mods. By the end of the session, we had worked out an entire framework for making a mod. A Maven archetype to create a template Bukkit plugin allowed the attendees to avoid writing boilerplate code. A lower bar to get started and simplicity was the key for this audience. The mod built in the workshop added a new server-side command and printed a trivial message.

Although the goal of the workshop was to get an introduction on programming and make a Minecraft mod, I believe the attendees learned much more than that. I think the informal set up helped them discover that programming can be fun and useful to add to gaming experience. Programming is a vast field and we barely scratched the surface. But most importantly, the attendees had a good time and learned their first lesson of Java programming to start off an interest in it.

"Fun", "Easy", "Quick", "Awesome", "Short", and "Intuitive" described attendees' one word summary of building and running their first Hello World application using NetBeans.

All the instructions followed in the workshop, including a lot more pictures, are available atjava4kids.java.net/minecraft-workshop.

For me, it was quite a humbling and learning experience. I've delivered multiple workshops all around the world but mostly to professional developers. I realized how the instructions need to be completely spelled out in order for the attendees of this age to make progress. Something as simple as "Hit Enter after entering the command", yes, that is required. Anyway I plan this to be the first of many more workshops aimed to introduce the world of Java programming to school students.

One of the lessons learned during the workshop was to simplify the installation experience. All the kids had JDK and NetBeans set up already, pretty straight forward. However I wonder why Maven insists on JAVA_HOME variable instead of figuring it out. I need to investigate how to seamlessly install JDK, NetBeans, and Maven in a platform independent way. This will allow to focus more on building the actual mod rather than the multi-step installations.



This workshop was not possible without mentoring support from Allen Dutra and other parents. A huge shout out to my family who helped validate and calibrate my strategy for the audience. My nephews feedback from the lab is incorporated into this blog. Thanks to Oracle for sponsoring the snacks!

Thank you @notch for using Java to build the game! You've provided a great platform for young kids to learn Java and truly enabled Make The Future Java ...

Thank you to Arun Gupta, whose passion for Java is boundless! You can read his blog at blogs.oracle.com/arungupta.

Tuesday Apr 02, 2013

Devoxx France Plays to a Full House!

Devoxx France started with the return of the Grrrail from Devoxx UK by le papa (the father) of Devoxx Stephan Janssen. As he announced to great acclaim during the keynote, the Devoxx 2013 sessions will be freely available on Parleys. He also received applause for his demo of the new Html5 version. 

The conference was sold out again this year with 1,480 attendees, which is 250 more than last year.  The conference was packed with Java related tracks touching on the web, architecture, Java technologies and infrastructure to name a few. The labs, quickies, conference sessions, tools in action catered to the ever-evolving needs of developers.

The sessions about Java EE 7, JavaFX and Java SE were all well-received with more attendees than available seating. The upcoming Java EE 7 generated a lot interest and especially for Websocket and standardized batch processing.  Oracle was a European partner; a premium sponsor for the 3 Devoxx conferences: London, Paris and Moscow.

The Devoxx France team did a fantastic job of managing the following parallel activities, in addition to the packed conference. They included a CTO track, a day on DevOps methodology, coding days and competitions. Developers coded for an afternoon to win the code competition. They also coded, created documentation, fixed bugs for open source projects in the Hackergarden.  Devops Mercenaries tackled multiple versions of native packages and the use of Kanban approach to prioritize in an all day event. CTOs and CEOs came to the decision maker afternoon to learn and share their cloud strategies in enterprise. 

6 to 14 year olds attended Programatoo, a programming workshop for a day during the conference. They learned to program with Lego windstorms. According to Nicolas Martignole, co-founder of Devoxx France, Programatoo was Devoxx's best investment for the future.As he announced to great acclaim during the keynote, the Devoxx 2013 sessions are freely available on Parleys. He also received applause for his demo of the new Html5 version. 

About

Insider News from the Java Team at Oracle!

duke
javeone logo
Links


Search

Archives
« April 2013 »
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
 
1
5
6
7
9
11
13
14
17
19
20
21
23
24
26
27
28
    
       
Today