Monday Feb 25, 2013

Java Save Lives at Mobile World Congress

Mobile World Congress used to just be about mobile phones and the industry around mobile networks. Now "mobile" has redefined itself and is about sensors everywhere: cars, scooters, buildings, people, etc. The M2M (or "Internet of Everything") revolution is here, with mobile phones as just one of the many components that create an intelligent, connected world. As the mobile industry moves its focus from voice to data, developers now have the entire world as a potential for apps. The world is literally your oyster (sorry, had to).

With all this opportunity comes decisions to make. Todays' developers have a wide range of choices in terms of what device they are going to use and how to control it. How smart is the device? Do you want it to be tailored and tuned to a specific solution or something more broad? How do you get the data from the device to the data center? The device and platform you choice are key components for a successful implementation. Java has been on devices for a long time: smart cards, cars, ATMs, phones, underwater probes, and more. Java enables devices to be intelligent, scalable and supportable. Want to update a device remotely? Done. Want it to be headless? Done. Want a remote sensor on your grandmother that calls the hospital if she falls, and also lets the paramedics open the door to her house? Done. Here's video that shows Java saving grandma's life at Mobile World Congress:

If you are at MWC, drop by the Oracle booth and learn more. You also have a shot at winning a Raspberry Pi at WIPJam @ MWC 2013 event for mobile developers Thursday evening. See how Oracle and Deutsche Telekom have made it possible to make your coffee by phone, by combining a coffee machine, a Raspberry Pi, Java SE and the Deutsche Telekom network. M2M can deliver your favorite brew (and programming language and platform)!

Wednesday Feb 20, 2013

Java in Action at Mobile World Congress

Mobile World Congress next week in Barcelona will be a gathering of over 70,000 people to discuss the state of mobile communications. As the MWC brochure says, "The mobile ecosystem is expanding at lightning speed, with endless innovation and new applications of mobile technology." And Java is right in the mobile mix.

How about using your phone to start a coffeemaker with Java? Come to WIPJam @ MWC 2013, an event for mobile developers, and see how Oracle and Deutsche Telekom have made it possible to make your coffee by phone. By combining Java SE Embedded, a Raspberry Pi, the Deutsche Telekom network, and a coffee machine, you'll see how M2M can deliver your favorite brew. Stop by, you may win a prize!

Join Oracle's Java team and 1,000 developers at WIPJam @ MWC 2013, sponsored by Developer Garden, the developer ecosystem of Deutsche Telekom. They will be featuring the role of Java technologies in their developer platform and kit in their sessions. As developers know, mobile technology has proven itself to be a remarkable platform for innovation, and the opportunities continue to grow.

Wednesday Dec 21, 2011

Updating Java ME Applications

A new article up on otn/java, by Java ME expert Vikram Goyal, titled “Updating Java ME Applications,” demonstrates how easy it is to update the text, images, and source code for Java ME applications. Goyal explains that updating a Java ME application includes updating static data, such as text and images, as well as code components of the application. In the article, he develops a sample app that illustrates how to update an application.

As Goyal explains, “The article starts with the basics—updating simple text strings—and then moves to updating images. Finally, the article shows the easiest way to update the core application files, which Java ME makes quite easy. However, this ease can come at a price in terms of extra network traffic.”

Goyal concludes the article with some basic advice:

“If you don’t need to update the entire source code for your application, use the connection classes provided within the javax.io package, such as ContentConnection and HttpConnection, to update static data, such as text and images.

On the other hand, if you need to provide a mechanism for updating the entire source code, make sure you follow a valid update process on the server, and use platformRequest(String) with a URL that ends in jad to provide the updates. The device’s interface will then make sure the updates are applied by removing the old MIDlet and installing the new updated version.”

Read the complete article here.



Wednesday Nov 09, 2011

Working with the XML Parser API — JSR 172

Vikram Goyal’s article, “Working with the XML Parser API — JSR 172,” now up on otn/java, covers the basics of the XML Parsing API via a concrete example that uses SAX (Simple API for XML), a parsing method which is now preferred to the alternative method, and DOM (Document Object Model), which has a heavy memory footprint that led the XML Parser API to disallow its use in XML processing. “The XML Parser API,” explains Goyal, “defines the use of the SAX parser for parsing XML documents in resource-constrained devices.”

 

He explains through a working example what the SAX parser is, how it is defined by the API, and how best to use it.

 

From the article:

 

“In a nutshell, for the parsing of a custom XML document, you need to create a handler that extends the DefaultHandler class provided by the API. This custom handler is responsible for listening to the events from the parser and creating the model based on those events (and the supplied data). Your handler is responsible for validating the document and its data.”

 

Read the article.

 

Friday Aug 05, 2011

A Fresh Look at Embedded with Greg Bollella, Chief Architect, Embedded Java

In a new interview on OTN, Greg Bollella explores the rich potential of Java in the embedded space. He defines the embedded space as, “any device that includes a general-purpose processor and OS, plus a software execution environment, but which would not be identified as a computer by a layperson.” He points out that, increasingly, with cars, stereos, printers, cameras, TVs and DVDs, traffic signals controllers, planes, washing machines, refrigerators, and much more, it’s the software and not the hardware that matters the most.

Bollella believes that developers have only scratched the surface when it comes to Java for embedded and that Java’s multi-core support, security, multi-platform support, and networking strengths are of great value for embedded developers.

As he states in the interview, “To create new projects we want to create a VM and library set and some tools to entice the embedded developer to use Java for their next project. So that’s my mission.”

To integrate embedded devices into a networked world is no small task. From the interview:

“You need a fairly complex software architecture to integrate these devices into the networked world. Doing that from scratch is pretty tough. Oracle can provide the client side piece, the piece in the device, as well as the backend servers and the middleware. That, combined with a very small amount of engineering from the device manufacturers, can enable them to collect operational data on the device, time-stamp it, save it to the local data base, and have that data be automatically synced with the backend database and thus available for analysis and provision of new services for the device owner.”

Read the interview here.

Wednesday Oct 13, 2010

TIM Launches Mobile Java App Store

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