Thursday Apr 28, 2016

Tips and Tricks for Better Applications

How to take full advantage of Java EE and Java SE features in your web applications. In this presentation, David Blevins discussed the topic of extensibility with CDI, CDI Scopes and EJB. He explains how to use scopes in CDI, and add your own Bean types. He shows scope samples you can download and basic classes for making your own scopes. In the second part of his presentation, he explains the new Java 8 features and how to leverage them for your Java EE applications. Watch his presentation. 

Wednesday Apr 27, 2016

Java SE Webinar Replay

Learn how improvements to the Java platform, APIs and the Java language will help you develop innovative applications using parallel programming, integration with other languages and tools, and APIs that will substantially boost your productivity. Watch three webinar sessions from the April edition of Virtual Technology Summit

Java on Mobile: Johan Vos shows how easy it is to create a highly-polished Material Design Java application, and to deploy it on an Android device and an iOS device with exactly the same code used in both deployments.

Asynchronous programming in Java 8: Jose Paumard explains how the patterns introduced by this interface and its implementing class are new to the Java platform, and how they fill the gap in the old Future patterns.

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers: David Delabassee presents powerful Java 8 APIs such as Lambda expressions, a new Date and Time API, the Streams API, Completable Futures, Nashorn, Repeatable Annotations, String joiners, etc.

Thursday Apr 21, 2016

JavaFX Applications Across Devises

Using the new Gluon Mobile framework and some hardware from Adafruit, Gerrit Grunwald describes how to create a mobile/desktop application that can be used to control a mood light that can be turned on and off, set to a particular color, or set to a color cycling mode. His goal in the article "In the Mood: Build Your Own Mood Light and Control It with Java" is to show how easy it is to create a mobile app based on JavaFX.

The Gluon Mobile framework provides methods for achieving platform-dependent settings, which is critical when building an app for different platforms--such as mobile, embedded, and desktop devices--because the UI design is often totally different on different platforms. And, if you are building an Android app, Grundwald points out another advantage of the Gluon Mobile framework: even though Android is not capable of running Java 8, you can use Java 8 in your source code because Gluon Mobile uses retrolambda, which makes it possible to use Java 8 features (except streams) on Java 7.

Grundwald's mood light can be hooked up to the internet and controlled remotely from different devices, such as a mobile phone and a desktop computer. And, if you don't think you need a mood light, he points out another use: you can use it as a build-server status light or for other purposes.

To see how using JavaFX on mobile devices can be a real alternative to native applications--not for all use cases, but at least for some--read the article.

Tuesday Apr 19, 2016

New Release JDK 8u91 and JDK 8u92

JDK 8u91 and 8u92, two new Java 8 updates are now available. Oracle strongly recommends that most Java SE users upgrade to the latest Java 8u91 CPU release, which includes important security fixes. Java SE 8u92 is a patch-set update, including all of Java 8u91 plus additional features. You can download the latest JDK releases from Java SE Downloads page. 

For information on new features and bug fixes included in these releases, see the following release notes: 

JDK 8u92 Release Notes

Check out Java CPU and PSU Releases Explained for more details  

Wednesday Apr 13, 2016

Humanoid Robot Programming with Java

“The Nao Robot can play soccer and compete for RobotCup with its cameras tracking the ball and field movements” explains Nicolas Rigaud community manager at Aldebaran Robotics. Watch this interview where Nicolas explains the Nao’s hardware. 

Monday Apr 11, 2016

Java Magazine March/April Issue

By Java Magazine Editor Andrew Binstock

Welcome to the March/April issue of Java Magazine in which we dig into the inner workings of Java and the JVM. This issue is pure nerd-stim: bits and bytes have never been as much fun as exploring how the JVM manages garbage collectors and code caches. All good developers are mindful of how their code executes, but due to constant advances in the language and the JVM, knowing what's going on behind the scenes is not always easy.

So, let's dig in. We start by looking into the fundamentals of just-in-time (JIT) compilation in the JVM, we compare the performance of different garbage collectors, and then we update an article on the JVM's code cache and its effects on performance. To these, we add deep dives into how Java itself works: how annotations are handled and how to write your own annotations; plus we examine how the Java Collections Framework was optimized using laziness, which is a technique that is available to you in your code.

The rest of the issue shows off Golo, a new JVM language; better persistence in Java EE; and how enums work in Java--all topped off by our famous language quiz, our no-holds-barred book review, and my editorial, which discusses a new proposal by the Java team to add greater type inference to the language. Enjoy! 

Read this new edition of the Java Magazine


Wednesday Apr 06, 2016

Chef and Puppet Samples

Samples of Chef cookbooks and Puppet modules are now available on Oracle’s official GitHub page at https://github.com/oracle/chef-samples and https://github.com/oracle/puppet-samples for Java, WebLogic and Fusion Middleware.

Edwin Biemond explains in a blog series how to use those samples and create a WebLogic domain in Chef or Puppet on a Windows, Linux or Solaris host. In the presentation below, Edwin shows how to install FMW software, patch and extend a domain with FMW software.


Wednesday Mar 30, 2016

Last Interactive Online Java Webinar with Q&A

The Virtual Technology Summit (VTS) delivers interactive Java technical content from Java Champions and Oracle experts to your desk.  

The interactive, online event, is sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). The April 5 event is the last one in this VTS series. It features six Java technical sessions about Java EE, cloud, and Java SE API. Register now

The Java Track includes three code-heavy sessions:

Java on Mobile: Thanks to innovations in mobile JVM's and the availability of JavaFX on iOS and Android, it is now possible to write applications once (in Java) and deploy them on the major mobile platforms. In this session, we will show how easy it is to create a highly-polished Material Design Java application, and to deploy it on an Android device and an iOS device with exactly the same code used in both deployments.

Asynchronous programming in Java 8: how to use CompletableFuture: This presentation aims to explain how the patterns introduced by this interface and its implementing class are new to the Java platform, and how they fill the gap in the old Future patterns.The different models are precisely presented: how to create complex asynchronous processing pipelines, how to deal with exceptions, how to test complex code. 

Down-to-Earth Microservices with Java EE: the session explores microservices using a simple but representative example using Java EE. You'll see how the Java EE programming model and APIs like JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, Bean Validation, CDI, JPA, EJB 3, JMS 2 and JTA aligns with the concept of microservices.

Java SE 8 for Java EE Developers: Java SE 8 brings a bounty of improvements. In this session, you will learn about Lambda expressions, a new Date and Time API, the Streams API, Completable Futures, Nashorn, Repeatable Annotations, String joiners, etc.

Thinking Beyond ORM in JPA:  This session discusses native-query support in JPA along with stored procedures and result set mappings in JPA 2.1. The presented code samples illustrate the details of the API, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Our analysis reveals applicable use cases and most popular approaches. The summary provides guidelines on how and when to utilize native queries.

Visualizing Data in the Cloud with Oracle JET: Oracle JET is a free and open source toolkit, providing a solid basis for enterprise JavaScript applications, including built-in solutions for accessibility, modularity, and data visualization. In this code-driven session, you will learn everything you need to know to create maintainable enterprise applications in JavaScript!

Tuesday Mar 29, 2016

Moving to Garbage First

Garbage First (G1) is likely to become the default collector in Java 9. In this presentation, Kirk Pepperdine shows different case studies on how to use the G1 with your applications. He also demonstrates tips and tricks to work around some of the hiccups. 


In this interview, Kirk Pepperdine shows his Censum performance diagnostics tool from jClarity and describes the state of G1 GC 


Waste Management in JDK 9

“Instead of a simple garbage collector to free up memory, Garbage First (G1) takes the role of a waste management consultant: freeing unused memory and identifying ways to reduce the overall amount of garbage.” explains Eric Costlow in a new blog

Costlow demonstrates how string Deduplication can significantly decrease heap usage. Using the Eclipse IDE, he runs a performance test using Java Flight Recorder to benchmark the results.

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