Secure Coding Guidelines for Java SE

With so much happening around the Java platform, it’s understandable if you missed the recent improvements we made to the Secure Coding Guidelines for Java SE.  In January 2014 the Java Platform Group released a significant update, Java 7 Update 51 establishing code-signing as the default for Applets and Web Start applications.  Following in March 2014, we hit another major milestone with the long anticipated release of Java SE 8.

There are a number of improvements to the Secure Coding Guidelines for Java SE.  On the surface, the larger domains of the coding guidelines like Fundamentals and Denial of Service are the same but content has been improved throughout each domain based upon changes to Java’s threat landscape.  Likewise, small but noteworthy improvements to content navigation were made to the domains in table of contents facilitating quick navigation for readers.

Beyond content improvements, code examples were refreshed to highlight new Java 8 features like Lambda.  While our coding guidelines are updated for Java SE 8, most guidance is relevant to older versions like Java SE 7.  Please keep in mind secure application coding and design is only one component in a secure solution.  Building secure solutions requires OS security hardening, application and infrastructure hardening, patching all components on a timely schedule, etc.  More information about Java security is available in the Security Resource Center for Java.

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Science Duke
This blog contains topics related to Java SE, Java Security and Usability. The target audience is developers, sysadmins and architects that build, deploy and manage Java applications. Contributions come from the Java SE Product Management team.

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