A Busy Day for Clouds - DSC and Netbeans Too

The Data Center as we Know It is Dead. (Sorry George Gilder)

Officially -- welcome to cloud computing from Sun.

If you haven't seen the news, look at Sun's Cloud Announcement and check it out for yourself. Netnet -- Sun's Cloud business unit is not only building our own public cloud (at SuperNAP today -- but also taking that technology to our service providers, other partners, and our direct customers (private clouds.)

Also, my team, specifically Robert Holt, Mikael Lofstrand, and myself have been working on something called OpenSolaris Dynamic Service Containers (DSC) -- you can join the fun at Kenai.com. This makes it easy to manage containers/zones and scale them up and down across physical nodes -- all via a simple registry.

Additioanlly, we've been working on some IDEs for the cloud -- look at John Kirby's page for some ideas here. This will eventually link to the DSC work above and our own cloud offering based around x86 virtualization (VMIs.) Why is this important??

The deployment model is assembled in the IDE today but the cloud needs to manage the workload. The "model" can't simply live in the IDE, it needs to live in the cloud as well.

Great work team!!

Comments:

I disagree with the statement "The Data Center as we Know It is Dead". I will meet you in the middle with "The Data Center as we Know It is Changing". From a market driven perspective, I cannot see the Data Center simply going away.

It is height of hubris (remember that word from Paideia?) for companies like Sun, Microsoft, and Google to presume they can be all things to all customers. The marketplace is not one-size-fits-all. Actually, "size" is the wrong word. "Flavor" is a much better word. Perhaps I should say "Not everyone in the marketplace likes vanilla (or sherbet, or strawberry, or chocolate)".

This is the Achilles' heel of cloud computing. The major players are trying to design an infrastructure which will be all flavors to all people. Think the Neapolitan ice cream of production environments. The problem is once it melts, the flavors run together to form an unpalatable soup. This stifles the innovation, uniqueness, and creativity individual end companies can create.

Okay, this is a heady topic to be discussing the problems of a macro environment. Let me illustrate my point about cloud computing by looking at a micro environment. I have sent you several emails and I cannot believe you are simply ignoring me. Thus I have to conclude that somewhere an anti-spam policy is being applied to my messages. In all likeliness, the Sun email messaging team has incorrectly purged emails that you want to receive.

Operational assumptions like this will not scale to the cloud. Who are Sun, Microsoft, and Google to decide what Data Center infrastructure is best for a given business? The flexibility for a business to do what they want will ultimately result in a lukewarm reception for cloud computing.

I maintain my point: This will result in change within the Data Center, but it will never replace it.

-The Lurker

Posted by Martin McFly on March 23, 2009 at 09:20 AM PDT #

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Thoughts from Jason Carolan -- Distinguished Engineer @ Sun and Global Systems Engineering Director - http://twitter.com/jtcarolan - http://archmatters.wordpress.com

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