There's a new "Where" in "Anywhere"

One of the things I've been having fun with lately is the "mote" software from Sentilla (formerly MoteIV). As MoteIV, they've been doing these "mote" devices for several years. But they were really painful to program - so much so that the pain was a real obstacle. Now they have a tiny CLDC VM for these machines (that's one at the right, vaguely life size) and really nice tools as IDE plugins (Eclipse today, NetBeans support is in the works). They're renaming their company because they're changing the nature of their business: instead of building physical mote hardware, they do software used in motes made by others. These devices are usually used to make sensor meshes. The developer kit I have came with 4 motes that have temperature and humidity sensors - but they can use other sensors and control things: you just have to be handy with a soldering iron :-) If you look at the picture, you'll see a wide trace around the edge of the board and a circular structure in the lower right corner: this is the antenna for the RF network. These beasts have a slick mesh networking stack so that they can all talk to each other, routing packets through auto-discovered/configured paths. When you click the "run" button in the IDE, it deploys to the mesh... Totally easy. These are very much like SunSpots, but much smaller and oriented for the volume industrial market.
Comments:

How come you're not pushing SunSPOTs?

Posted by gegtik on October 17, 2007 at 05:41 AM PDT #

c++ is a project language

Posted by ysujava on October 17, 2007 at 12:37 PM PDT #

Sentilla motes are pretty cool and the use of Java ME (CLDC 1.1) as the foundation platform is great. In addition, the availability of a good IDE is going to make this technology really fun to work with and easy to develop.

I don't know about you, James, but I think Sentilla's product represents an important event in the history of computing - it's first platform for ubiquitous computing that is accessible by a huge developer population (6 million Java developers). You don't have to be an embedded computer programmer to make pervasive systems work.

Posted by Richard Monson-Haefel on October 18, 2007 at 01:25 AM PDT #

Interesting selection of books, Doc Gosling. You forgot one though: "Ca-ching: the history of E-bay, Java, and James."

Ciao.

Posted by Michael Henri-Rutaloffsky on October 20, 2007 at 11:53 AM PDT #

What the difference to that project:

http://jcontrol.org

More complete?

Bye.

Posted by Peter Karich on October 22, 2007 at 07:00 AM PDT #

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