The Omnivore's Dilemma

I finally got around to reading Michael Pollan's excellent book, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. It goes on my list of books that everyone should read. It paints a disturbing picture of the modern industrial food system, that is now up there with global warming on my list of things to worry about. But the book is hopeful too. The system can be fixed, and the movement to fix it is growing. One of the advantages of living near San Francisco is that this is an area where a lot of folks concerned about this problem are active. There are a lot of paradoxes to sort out: the human population of the planet has become immense, and it's not clear that sustainable healthy techniques can feed us all.
Comments:

I'm putting this one on my reading list now too. I was just watching PETA's video (http://getactive.peta.org/campaign/30_day_veg_pledge?source=vegpledgegen)
that will turn you into a vegetarian in 3 minutes or less, and I noticed much of it centered around the cruel treatment of animals in meat-packing facilities. It seemed a little one-sided and it sounds like this book might have a less biased view. I'll check it out.

Posted by melanie gao on September 23, 2007 at 05:25 PM PDT #

Think globally, act locally! :)

Posted by rod sandcones on September 27, 2007 at 01:03 AM PDT #

Dr Gosling,
The human population is not too large. The false meme about this is very dangerous. If one research the issue a little, one can find many strong, valid arguments showing that the meme is false. Then the next question is: why is this meme being broadcast repeatedly? Look at the other memes being associated with it: humans are destroying the Earth, technology is dangerous, etc.

One easy point: people that do not have food die in a few days, so the population that exists today has enough food, at least for a few days.

sure there are problems with humans, but lets look at the real ones, not the false ones, otherwise it's just gonna get worst.

so the next question is: what are the real problems? you or anyone else who knows about our history can answer that one if you think about it for a few days. You don't need to read it in a book.

for example, how come some people are dying today when we have too much food in most coutries? you know why I'm sure.

and the next question is: what are the solutions? Now this one is not easy because it depends on each one's situation. That's were the real work starts. but it's often quite clear when we are not confused by false memes.

cheers,

serge

Posted by serge on September 30, 2007 at 09:31 AM PDT #

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