Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 3)

So, let's now connect the parts together to make a Java Embedded ghost sensor using a Raspberry Pi. Grab your JFET transistor, LED light, wires, and breadboard and follow the connections on this diagram.

The JFET transistor plugs into the breadboard with the flat part facing left. Then, plug in a wire to the same breadboard hole row as the top JFET lead (green in the diagram) and keep it unconnected to act as an antenna. Then, connect a wire (red) from the middle lead of the JFET transistor to Pin 1 on your RPi GPIO header. And, connect another wire (blue) from the lower lead of the JFET transistor to Pin 25 on your RPi GPIO header, then connect another (blue) wire from the lower lead of the JFET transistor to the long end of a common cathode LED, and finally connect the short end of the LED with a wire (black) to Pin 6 (ground) of the RPi GPIO header.

That's it. Easy.

Now test it. See:

Ghost Sensor Testing

Here's a video of me testing the Ghost Sensor circuit on my Raspberry Pi. We'll cover the Java SE app needed to record the ghost analytics in the next post.

See the posts for the full series on the steps to this cool demo:
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 1)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 2)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 3)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 4)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 5)

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Hinkmond Wong's blog on making Machine to Machine (M2M) and the Incredible Internet of Things (IoT) smarter with Java Embedded Technologies

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