Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 2)

To start out our ghost hunting here at the Oracle Santa Clara campus office, we first need a ghost sensor. It's pretty easy to build one, since all we need to do is to create a circuit that can detect small fluctuations in the electromagnetic field, just like the fluctuations that ghosts cause when they pass by... Naturally, right?

So, we build a static charge sensor and will use a Java Embedded app to monitor for changes in the sensor value, running analytics using Java technology on a Raspberry Pi. Bob's your uncle, and there you have it: a ghost sensor.

See:

Ghost Detector

So, go out to Radio Shack and buy up these items:

shopping list:

  1 - NTE312 JFET N-channel 
      transistor 
      (this is in place of 
       the MPF-102)
  1 - Set of Jumper Wires
  1 - LED
  1 - 300 ohm resistor
  1 - set of header pins
Then, grab a flashlight, your Raspberry Pi, and come back here for more instructions... Don't be afraid... Yet.

See the posts for the full series on the steps to this cool demo:
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 1)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 2)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 3)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 4)
Halloween: Season for Java Embedded Internet of Spooky Things (IoST) (Part 5)

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Hinkmond Wong's blog on making Machine to Machine (M2M) and the Incredible Internet of Things (IoT) smarter with Java Embedded Technologies

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