Wednesday Jun 25, 2014

Java (SE Embedded Technology) Rises Again in IoT Developers Conference Summary

The Electronic Design site has a good summary of the Internet of Things Dev Conference where Java was reported being "at the center of many IoT and M2M platforms from the start". (Such as this Freescale i.MX6 Dual-based IoT Gateway which ships with Java SE Embedded directly on the device)

"Java at the center of IoT & M2M." So true. So, very true.

See:

Java Rises Again

Here's a quote:

 Actually Java has been at the center 
 of many IoT and M2M platforms from 
 the start. The movement to 32-bit 
 microcontrollers for clients make 
 it an interesting choice because 
 it provides portability...
And, the portability that Java SE Embedded technology gives is the key to IoT. That is, if you want your Apple HomeKit to talk to your Google Nest API's to talk to your Fitbit to talk to your AllJoyn network to talk to your Tesla car... It's going to be Java (once again) Embedded technology that ties it all together with standard and secure API's and protocols. Don't trust anyone else to remain neutral in tying all IoT devices and networks together.

Friday Jun 20, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)

So, you've got your Parallax Single Relay Board. Next you need to connect this to your furnace, fan, and A/C control wires... and, not burn down your house in the process. Got that? Good.

Refer back to your thermostat wires. We need to connect a Relay Board to each of the control wires for the Fan, Heat call, and Cool call. Here's a reminder which wire is which.

    Red - R - 24VAC
         or
    Red - Rh - 24VAC (dedicated to heat call)
    Red - Rc - 24VAC (dedicated to cooling call)

    Green - G - Fan on
    White - W - Heat call
    Yellow - Y - Cool call
    Blue or Black - C - Common

You will need 3 Relay Boards connecting to the Raspberry Pi to control the 3 house thermostat control wires (Green for Fan, White for Heat, and Yellow for Cool). First, make sure on your Adafruit PiTFT has the 2x13 male header properly soldered on to it to daisy chain your RPi header pins (to allow your Relay Boards to connect down to the RPi). This way your Adafruit PiTFT can use the SPI pins (SCK, MOSI, MISO, CE0, CE1) plus GPIO #24 and #25 for its use, while we use GPIO #00, #01, and #04 for the Relay Boards. It's nice to share.

On each Relay Board, connect the + to the +5 VDC pin on your Adafruit PiTFT (male header pin #2). Make use of continuous jumper wires to share the one +5 VDC pin with all 3 of the Relay Boards. Then, connect the - to the GND pin (male header pin #6) using a continuous jumper wire to share this pin also. And, finally connect the S pin of one of your Relay Boards to GPIO #00 (pin #3), one S pin to GPIO #01 (pin #5), and the final S pin to GPIO #04 (pin #7).

Then connect all 3 Relay Boards Common screw down connector to the C - Common wire of your thermostat. Connect one Relay Board Normal Open (NO) screw down connector to the Green Fan wire, one NO screw down connector to the White Heat wire, and the final NO screw down connector to the Yellow Cool wire. Cool? Cool!

You are good to go for the next step!

See, not so bad still, right? ;-)

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 8)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 9)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Wednesday Jun 04, 2014

OpenJDK DIO Project Now Live! Java SE Embedded API Accessing Peripherals

The DIO project on OpenJDK is now live! For those who grew up in the 1970's and 1980's, you might remember Ronnie James Dio, lead singer of Black Sabbath after Ozzy was fired, and lead singer of his own band, Dio. Well, this DIO is not that Dio.

This DIO is the OpenJDK Device I/O project which provides a Java-level API for accessing generic device peripherals on embedded devices, like your Raspberry Pi running Java SE Embedded software.

See:

OpenJDK DIO Project

Here's a quote:

  + General Purpose Input/Output 
    (GPIO)
  + Inter-Integrated Circuit Bus 
    (I2C)
  + Universal Asynchronous 
    Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
  + Serial Peripheral Interface
If you're familiar with Pi4J, then you're going to like DIO. And, if you liked Ozzy, you probably liked Ronnie James Dio.

This will probably make Robert Savage happy too. The part about DIO being live now, not the part about Dio replacing Ozzy, because everyone likes Ozzy.

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Hinkmond Wong's blog on making the Internet of Things (IoT) smarter with Java Technologies

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