Monday Jan 27, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)

So, let's get started in building your own $3.2 billion (with a "b") Nest Startup using a Raspberry Pi, some hobby electronic parts, and Java SE Embedded Technology. The journey of a $3.2 billion startup begins with a single step-down transformer... er, or something like that.

First, we'll need a crash course in home thermostat technology. Here in the U.S., if you first flip off the circuit breaker to your home heating furnace and A/C, then take off the thermostat panel in your house, you should see these standardized labeled wires (with various colors of wires that are not standardized):

    Red - R - 24VAC
         or
    Red - Rh - 24VAC (dedicated to heat call)
    Red - Rc - 24VAC (dedicated to cooling call)

    Green - G - Fan on
    White - W - Heat call
    Yellow - Y - Cool call
    Blue or Black - C - Common

If you see a wire labeled "C" (Common) and the rest of the labeled wires (above), then you are OK. If you do not see the "C" label on a wire, you must ask an electrician friend or hire an electrical contractor to run the common "C" wire from a furnace relay to your thermostat. Otherwise, if you do not have the "C" wire at your thermostat, stop here since the "C" wire is needed to power the Raspberry Pi and especially for the Wi-Fi adapter to have enough power to allow your new SmartThermostat to be networked.

If after one way or another you do have a "C" wire at your thermostat, then you are ready for the first step which is to connect the Bridge Rectifier GBU608 and the DC to DC step-down transformer from your Raspberry Pi to your thermostat wires to power it from the 24VAC of your thermostat wiring (C and either Rh or Rc or R). The Bridge Rectifier turns the 24VAC of your furnace relay from 24 volts of AC power to 33 volts DC power, and the step-down transformer turns the 33 volts DC down to 5 volts DC for the Raspberry Pi (and all its peripherals).

Come back to the next blog post to see how that's done... It's a fun step since it's your first one! ;-)

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Wednesday Jan 22, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)

As we all saw recently, the company that starts with the letter "G" up Highway 101 in Mountain View bought Nest Labs for $3.2 billion (with a "b"), maker of the Internet of Things (IoT) Nest thermostat. Well, here's your chance in this new Java SE Embedded IoT blog series, to learn how to build your own $3.2 billion Nest Startup using a Raspberry Pi, some hobby electronic parts, and Java SE Embedded Technology.

This blog series was inspired by Spark Team's Arduino Based blog post at the spark.io. But, we'll use a more powerful but still inexpensive Raspberry Pi, and we'll base the software on Java SE Embedded which is a much more powerful programming language and platform than you can ever find on the Arduino.

This project will need the following parts:

So, for the low total cost of about $128.30 (plus tax and shipping) you can build your own $3.2 billion IoT startup company. Well... maybe, the start of a $3.2 billion IoT startup company, but you'll have a nifty IoT Java SE Embedded enabled home thermostat in the end, regardless. And, that's just as good as a $3.2 billion IoT startup, right? ;-)

Come back for the next steps in this series, to get you on your way...

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Friday Jan 10, 2014

Happy Java SE Embedded Enabled Internet of Things (IoT) New Year!

Whew! That's a mouthful to say. How about if I just say, "Happy Java-Is-the-Best-for-IoT New Year!" That's better. In 2014, for this blog I hope to explore new and interesting ways to make your Internet of Things smarter by using Java SE Embedded.

As a look back at 2013, you can see by my blog statistics (in the picture) that it seems like there were a lot of embedded developers out there who were interested in the blossoming IoT topics that my blog covered over the past 12 months.

You can also see my blog's Page Views, Unique Visits, and Returning Visits for all of 2013 vs. all of 2012 (for comparison).

See:

My Blog 2013 vs. 2012 Summary

The overall numbers for 2013 look great, with 152,262 unique visitors who stopped to read my blog last year (2013) compared to 108,162 of you who stopped by in the previous year (2012). And, the 2013 visitors read 202,818 pages of my blog for all of last year. Whew! That's a lot of pages read!

Thanks to all who follow my blog! As you can also see in the chart, last year there were 16,183 returning visitors to my blog compared to 7,738 returning visitors in 2012. So, hopefully, I will keep posting technical updates, DIY IoT projects, and interesting news and articles about Java SE Embedded in 2014 to match what you all wanted in 2013 when there was such a big uptick in my return visitors.

Leave me a comment if there are any specific topics you'd like me to cover related to Java SE Embedded, Internet of Things, and how to make embedded devices smarter for 2014.

In the meantime, I hope everyone has a Happy New Year! :-D

About

Hinkmond Wong's blog on making Machine to Machine (M2M) and the Incredible Internet of Things (IoT) smarter with Java Embedded Technologies

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