Wednesday Jan 30, 2013

USB to Raspberry Pi Console Connection for Java Embedded Development

Here's a great way to connect a USB cable to the RPi Console making a two-way connection for console input/output for your Java Embedded Development.

Just follow the hint that Wolf Paulus gives in his blog post (photo is from Wolf Paulus also)

See: Serial Connections to RPi

For Java Embedded development, the easiest way I found (which I told Gary C. about recently) is to use an FTDI Breakout Board with a USB port.

Here are the steps:

1. Buy these parts:
OSEPP FTDI Breakout Board $15.99
http://www.frys.com/product/6997547?site=sr:SEARCH:MAIN_RSLT_PG

Set of Jumper Wires $12.99
http://www.frys.com/product/7367744?site=sr:SEARCH:MAIN_RSLT_PG

SIIG 2 Amp/2 Port USB Adaptor
http://www.frys.com/product/7182042?site=sr:SEARCH:MAIN_RSLT_PG

Micro USB cable
http://www.frys.com/product/6151789?site=sr:SEARCH:MAIN_RSLT_PG


2. Make sure the jumper on the FTDI Breakout is configured for 3.3 volts.

3. Use the jumper wires to make 2 connections from the FTDI Breakout 
Board to the RPi:

From FTDI 3.3V TXD to (GPIO Pin 8)
From FTDI 3.3V RXD to (GPIO Pin 10)

See this Web reference:
http://wolfpaulus.com/journal/embedded/raspberry_serial

4.Connect one end of a USB cable into the FTDI and the other 
end into the Windows/Mac/Linux PC. 

5. Then use PuTTy or minicom on a Windows/Mac/Linux PC with a 
new connection to the right serial port (Ex. /dev/ttyUSB0 on a 
Linux PC or COM5/COM6/COM?? on Windows PC) using these serial 
connection settings 115200 bps 8-N-1.

6. Hit return a couple times to get the console prompt.  
Make sure the RPi is properly powered with it's AC adapter 
(not connected to a computer for power since only the AC 
adapter that comes with the RPi has enough current to drive 
it for this use).

VoilĂ ! You have a USB connection to the RPi console to do your Java Embedded programming. Nifty, huh?

Monday Jan 28, 2013

Embedded with Raspberry Pi Focus in This Month's Oracle Java Magazine

The latest edition of Java Magazine is out (Jan/Feb 2013) and has several articles on Java Embedded.

You'll want to click on the link and register if you'd like. Then skip to pages 20-30, and then to the main feature on page 31 for a good article on Java Embedded on the Raspberry Pi by Simon Ritter.

See:

Java Magazine 201301

Here's a quote:

  pg. 31 - Java on the Raspberry
    Pi
  pg. 26 - Top 10 Reasons to Use
    Java in Embedded Apps
It's a great read and has fun photos.

Friday Jan 25, 2013

Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 1)

So, you've got your Arduino Compatible LS-0006 Servo. Now, we want to prepare it to connect to the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins to drive it to move with a Java Embedded app.

To prepare the servo, we want to add one of the plastic arms that comes in the package. Find one of the arms that you'll use to glue paper to. We'll put a graphic on the paper so that it can be easily seen for this demo. Just take one of the screws included with the LS-0006 and attached one of the plastic arms of your choice to the main axle of the servo (see photo).

When you have that ready, we'll next connect the servo to some of the GPIO pins of the RPi. The GPIO will be driven by a Java app to pulse current to the different leads to the servo. This will drive the motor either clockwise or counter-clockwise by 10 degree increments for a 90 degree range of motion. Other servo models have more motion, but for this demo we'll just keep it simple.

In the next Web post we'll map out which pins to connect to which wires...

See the full series of blogs posts for this demo:
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 1)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 2)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 3)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 4)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 5)

Wednesday Jan 16, 2013

Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it

Lots of hobbyist like to connect robot arms with servos to the Raspberry Pi via the GPIO port. In my next set of blog posts, I'll cover how to connect a servo to your RPi and use Java Embedded to program it.

It means another Fry's run of course. See, you're getting the hang of this already...

Here's a your shopping list:

  1 - Arduino Compatible LS-0006 
      Servo - Plastic Gear 
      Analog (Medium)

This is available at Fry's Electronics or your local hobby electronics shop. Also, it's at Amazon here. Oh, and don't think we are going to build Data from Star Trek Next Generation (not quite yet). It's going to be more like the driver motor of Twiki's little pinky. ;-)

See the full series of blogs posts for this demo:
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 1)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 2)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 3)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 4)
Connect robot servo to RPi and use Java Embedded to program it (Part 5)

Friday Jan 11, 2013

Tudo de bom with Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Robot Servos, and Java Embedded Suite

Vinicius Senger, Bene, and Yara were here at Oracle Santa Clara to give their demo of a Raspberry Pi and Arduino board connected to a robot, all controlled by Java Embedded Suite.

Here's a video of him with the same demo in Brazil. He's speaking in Portuguese, but you can get the gist of what he's saying. I can understand: "Rahsp-berry Peye". :-)

See:

Sweet! RPi Robot w/Java Embedded Suite

Jump to timestamp 1:45 to see the awesome cool hardware he used with Java Embedded Suite.

Cool stuff, Vinicius, Yara, and Bene! Please come back again to demo more of your future work!

Wednesday Jan 09, 2013

A Raspberry Pi, An Oscilloscope, and Java Embedded Programming

There is nothing more awesome than seeing a RPi development board hooked up to a scope measuring the high performance results from a Java Embedded app running. Hardware and software, together. That's all kinds of awesomeness in Robert Savage's recent blog post.

See:

Java GPIO Frequency Benchmarks

Not only that, but Robert mentioned that the Oracle JDK 8 for ARM Early Access Java VM was the winner!

Here's the quote:

  The Oracle JVM turned out to the 
  be clear winner in this speed test.
Embedded Systems won't ever be the same now that we have a high performance Java Embedded VM ready for action on small devices like the RPi.

Monday Jan 07, 2013

JBlade Java Embedded IPMI library for sensor reading and embedded systems control

Hank Bruning from JBlade contacted me about their cool JBlade Hemi library offering that will work with Java Embedded. It's a pure Java Embedded library that uses the IPMI standard to read sensors (like temperature sensors) to control embedded systems (such as your CPUs, Fans, lights and BIOS parameters).

See:

JBlade Hemi

Here is a JBlade survey from Hank about taking temperature readings by embedded devices. If you have time before 31Jan2013, please take this survey to help JBlade learn more about your sensor needs:

JBlade Temperature Reading Survey

And, of course let us know at Oracle about your Java Embedded needs to create cool Java libraries like this one, or if there are other libraries you'd like to see in the future for embedded systems design.

About

Hinkmond Wong's blog on making Machine to Machine (M2M) and the Incredible Internet of Things (IoT) smarter with Java Embedded Technologies

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