Wednesday Jun 25, 2014

Java (SE Embedded Technology) Rises Again in IoT Developers Conference Summary

The Electronic Design site has a good summary of the Internet of Things Dev Conference where Java was reported being "at the center of many IoT and M2M platforms from the start". (Such as this Freescale i.MX6 Dual-based IoT Gateway which ships with Java SE Embedded directly on the device)

"Java at the center of IoT & M2M." So true. So, very true.

See:

Java Rises Again

Here's a quote:

 Actually Java has been at the center 
 of many IoT and M2M platforms from 
 the start. The movement to 32-bit 
 microcontrollers for clients make 
 it an interesting choice because 
 it provides portability...
And, the portability that Java SE Embedded technology gives is the key to IoT. That is, if you want your Apple HomeKit to talk to your Google Nest API's to talk to your Fitbit to talk to your AllJoyn network to talk to your Tesla car... It's going to be Java (once again) Embedded technology that ties it all together with standard and secure API's and protocols. Don't trust anyone else to remain neutral in tying all IoT devices and networks together.

Friday Jun 20, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)

So, you've got your Parallax Single Relay Board. Next you need to connect this to your furnace, fan, and A/C control wires... and, not burn down your house in the process. Got that? Good.

Refer back to your thermostat wires. We need to connect a Relay Board to each of the control wires for the Fan, Heat call, and Cool call. Here's a reminder which wire is which.

    Red - R - 24VAC
         or
    Red - Rh - 24VAC (dedicated to heat call)
    Red - Rc - 24VAC (dedicated to cooling call)

    Green - G - Fan on
    White - W - Heat call
    Yellow - Y - Cool call
    Blue or Black - C - Common

You will need 3 Relay Boards connecting to the Raspberry Pi to control the 3 house thermostat control wires (Green for Fan, White for Heat, and Yellow for Cool). First, make sure on your Adafruit PiTFT has the 2x13 male header properly soldered on to it to daisy chain your RPi header pins (to allow your Relay Boards to connect down to the RPi). This way your Adafruit PiTFT can use the SPI pins (SCK, MOSI, MISO, CE0, CE1) plus GPIO #24 and #25 for its use, while we use GPIO #00, #01, and #04 for the Relay Boards. It's nice to share.

On each Relay Board, connect the + to the +5 VDC pin on your Adafruit PiTFT (male header pin #2). Make use of continuous jumper wires to share the one +5 VDC pin with all 3 of the Relay Boards. Then, connect the - to the GND pin (male header pin #6) using a continuous jumper wire to share this pin also. And, finally connect the S pin of one of your Relay Boards to GPIO #00 (pin #3), one S pin to GPIO #01 (pin #5), and the final S pin to GPIO #04 (pin #7).

Then connect all 3 Relay Boards Common screw down connector to the C - Common wire of your thermostat. Connect one Relay Board Normal Open (NO) screw down connector to the Green Fan wire, one NO screw down connector to the White Heat wire, and the final NO screw down connector to the Yellow Cool wire. Cool? Cool!

You are good to go for the next step!

See, not so bad still, right? ;-)

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 8)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 9)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Wednesday Jun 04, 2014

OpenJDK DIO Project Now Live! Java SE Embedded API Accessing Peripherals

The DIO project on OpenJDK is now live! For those who grew up in the 1970's and 1980's, you might remember Ronnie James Dio, lead singer of Black Sabbath after Ozzy was fired, and lead singer of his own band, Dio. Well, this DIO is not that Dio.

This DIO is the OpenJDK Device I/O project which provides a Java-level API for accessing generic device peripherals on embedded devices, like your Raspberry Pi running Java SE Embedded software.

See:

OpenJDK DIO Project

Here's a quote:

  + General Purpose Input/Output 
    (GPIO)
  + Inter-Integrated Circuit Bus 
    (I2C)
  + Universal Asynchronous 
    Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
  + Serial Peripheral Interface
If you're familiar with Pi4J, then you're going to like DIO. And, if you liked Ozzy, you probably liked Ronnie James Dio.

This will probably make Robert Savage happy too. The part about DIO being live now, not the part about Dio replacing Ozzy, because everyone likes Ozzy.

Friday May 30, 2014

Maker Faire Report - Teaching Kids Java SE Embedded for Internet of Things (IoT)

I had a great time at this year's Maker Faire 2014 in San Mateo, Calif. where Jake Kuramoto and the AppsLab crew including Noel Portugal, Anthony Lai, Raymond, and Tony set up a super demo at the DiY table. It was a simple way to learn how Java SE Embedded technology could be used to code the Internet of Things (IoT) devices on the table.

The best part of our set-up was seeing the kids sit down and do some coding without all the complexity of a Computer Science course. It was very encouraging to see how interested the kids were when walking them through the programming steps, then seeing their eyes light up when telling them, "You just coded a Java enabled Internet of Things device!" as the Raspberry Pi-connected devices turned on or started to move from their Java Embedded program.

See:

The AppsLab at Maker Faire

It will be interesting to see how this next generation of kids grow up with all these Internet of Things devices around them and watch how they will program them. Hopefully, they will be using Java SE Embedded technology to do so. From the looks of it at this year's Maker Faire, we might have a bunch of motivated young Java SE Embedded coders coming up the ranks soon. Well, they have to get through middle school first, but they're on their way! ;-)

Wednesday May 14, 2014

Maker Faire 2014 - Java Technology and IoT come together

Make sure to come out to the Maker Faire 2014 this year at the San Mateo Event Center on May 17 & 18. It will be a weekend full of fun and high tech toys. Plus, come see our Java SE Embedded technology demos on the Raspberry Pi!

Jake, Noel Portugal, and the Oracle AppsLab did a great job on the DiY table, and Vinicius will show cool stuff on the IoT Panel wall. Plus, come meet other Java Embedded technology makers who will be staffing our Oracle Java Embedded Technology area.

See:

Maker Faire 2014

Here's a quote:

 Meet the Makers
 ---
 Explore makers and projects 
 coming to Bay Area Maker 
 Faire.
It'll be a good time for the whole family! So, come out and enjoy the (cooler) weather and a nice day playing with technology, crafts and talk with the people who make them.

Sunday May 11, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)

After showing how to connect the LCD Touchscreen from adafruit in Part 5 for this Java SE Embedded thermostat project, I figured out a simpler solution for the relays needed to turn on and off the furnace, fan, and A/C of a home heating and cooling system (just like the Nest thermostat).

So, it's time to show how to do a time-honored tradition in high tech start-up prototyping: Refactoring.

I found this cool Single Relay Board from Parallax. It can control up to 120VAC at 10 amps, but we only need to control 24VAC 1 amp relays for the home furnace, fan, and A/C. And most importantly, this Single Relay Board can take a 3.3 VDC signal from a microcontroller or Raspberry Pi running the Java SE Embedded platform (like we are doing in the project). No need for SPI or i2c, just a straight GPIO high value (3.3VDC) from the Raspberry Pi header pins from a Java SE Embedded app will control the relays. Cool!

So, I've got a bit of refactoring to do of my previous blog posts to swap in 3 of these Single Relay Boards (go ahead and order 3 if you are playing along at home). But, it's all good. Refactoring is part of the process of high tech start-up prototyping, right? :-)

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 8)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 9)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Tuesday Apr 29, 2014

Oracle Java SE Embedded India job openings, hot-hot-hot opportunities!

If you live in India and you're looking for an opportunity to work on the latest Java Embedded technology, we have some hot job openings on our team. We are currently planning some pretty cool projects that you would work on!

See Java Technology Jobs at Oracle:

Req IRC2495741

Req IRC2495743

Req IRC2495744

See also the LinkedIn Job Posting

So, check it out. You'll get the opportunity to program Java devices, work on cutting edge embedded platforms, and a get an opportunity to blog about it at the Oracle blog site. Won't that be fun? :) I think so. ;-)

Thursday Apr 10, 2014

What's on my Java SE Embedded enabled desk at work?

If you ever wondered what I have on my messy Java SE Embedded technology-enabled desk in my office, here's you chance to see. Check out Vinicius Senger's video interview of me explaining the Internet of Things (IoT) devices on my desk.

See:

My Messy Desk with Java SE Embedded

Maybe I should have straightened out my desk better!

Oh, well... Nothing like having company over to see how messy your stuff is. ;-)

Tuesday Apr 01, 2014

Oracle IoT Device to Translate Cat Meows: Java SE Embedded on Raspberry Pi

Here's a new Oracle Internet of Things (IoT) Device that translates cat meows into readable text. You just need a Raspberry Pi device, a USB connected mic, and Java SE Embedded technology to program the meow-to-text recognition software using cloud-based, kitty-crowd-sourced, big data to do the translations.

The inventor here at Oracle was quoted as saying:

 "I was watching my cat the other day,
  and I thought, 'I wonder what my cat is 
  thinking...  If there were only a way to 
  use an IoT device to translate my cat's 
  thoughts and meows into human readable
  text.'". "A couple days later, I had a 
  prototype with parts from old stereo 
  equipment and a Raspberry Pi, and now, 
  nine months later, I have a $350 billion 
  startup company."
Thus was born the Oracle IoT Cat Meowerator, a next-generation automated cat translation device that taps into millions of cat meows stored over the web on an Oracle cloud database to deliver carefully translated meow-to-text conversions to your device.

The device, now available on Amazon.com for $299.99, includes a mic, a stuffed bird toy with catnip, meaty treats, and a Raspberry Pi controller board. It uses a Realtek 802.11b/g/n controller to link to the Internet over a home WiFi net like another access point and Java SE Embedded technology to let you know, "April Fools!".

Wednesday Mar 19, 2014

EclipseCon2014, slides for "Java SE Embedded 8 Compact Profiles"

Here are my slides from the recent EclipseCon 2014 conference on the topic of Java SE Embedded 8 Compact Profiles.

Download Link:

Click here to view slides in full window

It was fun to present this talk at EclipseCon 2014. If you attended the talk, thanks from coming by!

Friday Mar 14, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)

We now have power to your Raspberry Pi. Next, we need to hook up the cool LCD Touchscreen from adafruit.com so that your Java SE Embedded thermostat app will have a UI. Lady Ada has some rockin' cool gear for your Raspberry Pi at her Web site!

See the cool video demo of the TFT touchscreen below:

To hook up her LCD Touchscreen to your RPi so that your Java SE Embedded app can use it, just follow these two sets of instructions from adafruit.com.

First do the assembly: TFT touchscreen assembly

Next do the software installation: TFT touchscreen software

That's it for this part. You can also check out the other steps at the adafruit.com Web site for screen calibration and other optional set-up steps. But, with the above minimal steps you now have a working touchscreen.

Next up, we will connect the PiFace for the relays needed to turn on and off your furnace and A/C via a Java SE Embedded app. That's when the stuff gets real... Or, sparks fly... One, or the other. :-)

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 8)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 9)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Wednesday Mar 05, 2014

The Path to a $16 Billion Acquisition? Build a Java ME App

As everyone saw in the press already, Facebook bought WhatsApp (maker of the startup mobile messaging app and service) for a hefty $16 billion. There was a lot of armchair analysis done just after the announcement, on how WhatsApp could be worth $16 billion. Here's a blog post (not mine) from the TextIt Blog, written by makers of the TextIt tool for SMS apps, that concludes the answer is Java ME technology (J2ME), and that Facebook bought WhatsApp for $16 billion because the WhatsApp Java ME port is available for feature phones, which if you look worldwide, still outnumber smartphones by a lot (a fact many developers and entrepreneurs overlook to their detriment).

See:

Java ME tech is the Answer

Here's a quote:

 So it finally happened, Facebook snatched 
 up WhatsApp for the not so bargain price of 
 $16B to the simultaneous head explosion of 
 every entrepreneur in Silicon Valley. A 
 common cry echoed around the world "But, 
 but, how is WhatsApp any different than 
 iMessage / Facebook Messenger / Hangouts?"

 To that, I have one answer: J2ME
So, even though it might not happen the same way for your mobile startup, you might want to consider the analysis by the TextIt blog post, that if you want to think big for mobile, you should consider a Java ME port of your mobile app to make sure you cover the whole market, not just the smaller smartphone (iOS and Android) market. Apparently, Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook did... :-)

Wednesday Feb 19, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)

So, you've now added your Bridge Rectifier and Transformer to your $3.2bln Nest Startup prototype. You just need to connect to power up your Raspberry Pi.

This next step is pretty straight-forward. To make life easy, you should buy a USB A Jack to Wire Lead connector at element14 or Newark Electronics: here. This jack will allow you to plug in a typical micro USB cable to power up your RPi.

After you purchase the USB A Jack to Wire Lead connector (above), see the spec sheet for details on how to hook it up to your Transformer: here.

Then, connect the black wire of your USB A Jack to your Transformer GROUND OUT (-) pad by soldering it together, and connect the red wire to your Transformer POWER OUT (+) pad by soldering those together. That's it!

Plug in one end of a standard micro USB cable to your USB A Jack, and the other end to your Raspberry Pi. Then connect your 24VAC power from your house thermostat wiring to your breadboard Bridge Rectifier as mentioned in Part 3/Step 4 and turn your circuit breaker back on, or use a temporary power source on your workbench as described in the later section of Part 3/Step 4 to test it.

If you reach this point and you haven't fried your Raspberry Pi, then that's a very good thing. If you accidentally see white smoke coming out of your Raspberry Pi board, shout out your favorite expletive and quickly unplug everything. But don't worry, just go back to Part 1 and buy another one. Heck, they're just $35 each! Buy, 2 or 3 more, just in case... ;-) Wouldn't hurt.

When you reach this point, and your RPi powers up correctly with very little or no swearing, do a little dance and get ready for the next step in building your own $3.2bln Nest Startup, which is where you connect up the LCD touchscreen.

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 8)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 9)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Monday Feb 03, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)

If you are this far along, it means you do have a "C" wire at your thermostat. Yay! That means you can connect the Bridge Rectifier GBU608 and the DC to DC step-down transformer from your thermostat wires to power your Raspberry Pi from the 24VAC of your thermostat wiring. We are using the C wire and either the (Rh or Rc wire) or the R wire to power the RPi, since one of the "R" wires is considered in AC terms "hot" and the "C" wire is considered "neutral".

NOTE: You need a "hot" wire and a "neutral" wire in AC household electrical circuits to complete or close an AC circuit. With most U.S. household thermostats, we are working with a lower 24VAC standard, and not your typical 110VAC found in U.S. homes. If your thermostat happens to be a higher voltage 110VAC thermostat, stop here and do not proceed. Your wiring for a 110VAC thermostat is not the same as the 24VAC we need for this project. If you are unsure whether your thermostat is 24VAC or 110VAC, ask an electrician friend or electrical contractor to check for you.

As a review, the Bridge Rectifier turns the 24VAC of your furnace relay from 24 volts of AC power to 33 volts DC power, and the step-down transformer turns the 33 volts DC down to 5 volts DC for the Raspberry Pi (and all its peripherals).

As with any $3.2 billion startup, you begin with a prototype, and that prototype is typically built using a breadboard, so that you can easily put it together and change it if necessary.

  1. So find a hobby electronic breadboard, and add your GBU608 Bridge Rectifier. In this part of the project you will run the inner two wires to connect from the breadboard to your "C" and one of your "R" wires of your thermostat (refer to the pinout diagram above)
  2. Use a wire connected to the notched edge pin of your GBU608 which represents the positive terminal to solder to the positive "IN" pad on your DC to DC Voltage Step-Down Transformer, and do the same with your unnotched edge pin of your GBU608 which is the negative connector and solder that to the negative "IN" pad on your DC to DC Voltage Step-Down Transformer.
  3. Solder two separate wires to the positive and negative "OUT" pads of your DC to DC Voltage Step-Down transformer
  4. Connect the two inner pins (marked with the "~" symbol) of your GBU608 Bridge Rectifier to your thermostat wires as described in Step #1: one inner pin connects to the "C" wire of your thermostat and the other inner pin connects to one of the "R" wires (or better yet for workbench development purposes, connect them to a temporary 24VAC power supply like this one to represent the thermostat power as you develop on your bench first).
  5. Use a voltmeter to measure the OUT pads of your DC to DC Voltage Step-Down transformer and adjust the screw of the transformer until your voltmeter reads 5 volts.

Once you have the screw set on your transformer, then your are ready to connect your Raspberry Pi in the next step... Fun!

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 8)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 9)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

Monday Jan 27, 2014

How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)

So, let's get started in building your own $3.2 billion (with a "b") Nest Startup using a Raspberry Pi, some hobby electronic parts, and Java SE Embedded Technology. The journey of a $3.2 billion startup begins with a single step-down transformer... er, or something like that.

First, we'll need a crash course in home thermostat technology. Here in the U.S., if you first flip off the circuit breaker to your home heating furnace and A/C, then take off the thermostat panel in your house, you should see these standardized labeled wires (with various colors of wires that are not standardized):

    Red - R - 24VAC
         or
    Red - Rh - 24VAC (dedicated to heat call)
    Red - Rc - 24VAC (dedicated to cooling call)

    Green - G - Fan on
    White - W - Heat call
    Yellow - Y - Cool call
    Blue or Black - C - Common

If you see a wire labeled "C" (Common) and the rest of the labeled wires (above), then you are OK. If you do not see the "C" label on a wire, you must ask an electrician friend or hire an electrical contractor to run the common "C" wire from a furnace relay to your thermostat. Otherwise, if you do not have the "C" wire at your thermostat, stop here since the "C" wire is needed to power the Raspberry Pi and especially for the Wi-Fi adapter to have enough power to allow your new SmartThermostat to be networked.

If after one way or another you do have a "C" wire at your thermostat, then you are ready for the first step which is to connect the Bridge Rectifier GBU608 and the DC to DC step-down transformer from your Raspberry Pi to your thermostat wires to power it from the 24VAC of your thermostat wiring (C and either Rh or Rc or R). The Bridge Rectifier turns the 24VAC of your furnace relay from 24 volts of AC power to 33 volts DC power, and the step-down transformer turns the 33 volts DC down to 5 volts DC for the Raspberry Pi (and all its peripherals).

Come back to the next blog post to see how that's done... It's a fun step since it's your first one! ;-)

Full series of steps:
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 1)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 2)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 3)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 4)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 5)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 6)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 7)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 8)
How to Build Your Own $3.2bln Nest Startup Using Java SE Embedded Tech (Part 9)
<<< Previous  | Next >>>

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Hinkmond Wong's blog on making the Internet of Things (IoT) smarter with Java Technologies

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