Tuesday Sep 25, 2012

Oracle releases new Java Embedded products

With less than one week to go to JavaOne 2012, we've spiced things up a little by releasing not one but two net new embedded Java products. This is an important step towards realizing the vision of Java as the standard platform for the Internet of Things that I outlined in a recent blog post. The two new products are:

  • Java ME Embedded 3.2. Based on same code as the widely deployed Oracle Java Wireless Client for feature phones, this new product provides a Java ME implementation optimized for very small microcontroller-based devices and adds - among other things - a new Device Access API that enables interaction with peripherals common in edge devices such as various types of sensors. In addition to the new Java ME Embedded platform, we have also released an update of the Java ME SDK which adds support for the development of small embedded devices.
  • Java Embedded Suite 7.0. This is an integrated middleware stack for embedded devices, incorporating Java SE Embedded and versions of JavaDB, GlassFish and a Web Services stack optimized for remote operation and small footprint.

A typical Internet of Things (or M2M) infrastructure contains three types of compute nodes: The edge device which is typically a sensor or control point of some kind. These devices can be connected directly to a backend through a mobile network if they are installed in - for example - a remote vending machine; or, they can be part of a local short-range network and be connected to the backend through a more powerful gateway device. A gateway is the second type of compute node and acts as an aggregator and control point for a local network. A good example of this could be a generalized home Internet access point, or home gateway. Gateways are mostly using normal wall power and are used for multiple applications, deployed by multiple service providers. Finally, the last type of compute node is the normal enterprise or cloud backend. Java ME Embedded and Java Embedded Suite are perfect base software stacks for the edge devices and the gateway respectively, providing the Java promise of a platform independent runtime and a complete set of libraries as well as allowing a programmer to focus on the business logic rather than plumbing.

We are very thrilled with these new releases that open up exciting opportunities for Java developers to extend services and enterprise applications in ways that will make organizations more efficient and touch our daily lives. To find out more, come to the JavaOne conference (for technical content) and to the Java Embedded @ JavaOne subconference (for business content). There will be plenty of cool demos showing complete end-to-end applications, provided by Oracle and our partners, as well as keynotes and numerous sessions where you can learn more about the technology and business opportunities.

Monday Aug 20, 2012

Introducing Java Embedded @ JavaOne

Analysts predict that the next revolution in the industry will be the Internet of Things. Speaking in hyperbole, the message is that we first had the Internet of Computers (90s), then the Internet of People (2000s) and that the next Big Thing (tm) is when all the gazillion devices we have around us start becoming connected. This is labeled the Internet of Things. Catchy phrase, isn't it?

So what are all these "things"? Well, if you look around, you will probably see a dozen of them from where you read this. Your car, an elevator, your washing machine, a pretty screen on your home AC control unit that shows scary statistics on how much power you're consuming in the heat of summer. And so on. A common description of this entire segment is "embedded", and it is an entire industry in and of itself. This industry is in a state similar to the PC market in the early 90s. There is a plethora of operating systems, toolchains, frameworks and standards, and a very fragmented hardware market. Programming these devices require specialized skills and is arguably quite a bit more complicated than writing a web or phone app.

In my completely unbiased opinion (ok, flame bait) it is clear that Java could be highly beneficial for this market. It has a large pool of skilled developers, a very mature runtime and development tools, and a well established ecosystem of commercial vendors and open source communities. Java is fast to work with, greatly simplifies portability of code across devices and - very important - adapts well to a rapidly evolving underlying platform. So you are moving from 16 (not a joke) to 32-bit? Just get a 32-bit JVM and you're set. Your embedded chips are becoming multi-core? Java and the JVM have supported multi-core for an eternity. You want to share that nifty communication protocol code you wrote between your backend and your little edge device? No problem. See?

For those interested in learning how to program embedded devices in Java, JavaOne has long had dedicated tracks and sessions for embedded and that remains true this year. However, this year we also wanted to reach out to executives and decision makers and show how Java can enable your business to benefit from the Internet of Things revolution. For this purpose we hold a new sub-conference called Java Embedded @ JavaOne.

If you are a business leader, register now. Then come and find out from us and our partners how Java enables tying embedded systems to your enterprise backend, and how Java can help your business grow with the Internet of Things while reusing existing investments and retaining good TCO on new investments.

If you are a developer, tell your manager that they should come and need a technical advisor (you) who can attend the main JavaOne event. And while you're there, go to a few embedded sessions to learn something new, such as how to make LEDs blink, how to properly secure an embedded device to avoid privacy issues or how to make it talk to your Java EE service in the cloud. Then go home and program your Java-enabled coffee machine to make you a perfect cup of Java :-)

Thursday Feb 23, 2012

Java at Embedded World 2012

If you are interested in the latest developments in the embedded-industry and want to make valuable business contacts, then visit Embedded World. Oracle will be showcasing the latest embedded Java technologies, along with more than 800 exhibitors from Germany and abroad who come to Nuremberg to present their products and services. Some statistics:

  • Approximately 20,000 attendees
  • 800 exhibitors from 32 countries
  • 18,350 visitors from 66 countries
  • 1,095 conference participants from 37 countries
  • 204 journalists from 17 countries

Our exhibit stand (stand 313, hall 5) will have 4 workstations with which we will be demoing Java Embedded on partner devices. Partners include: Inductive Automation, Marvell, Mobile Integration Workshop, Pactron, Revolution Robotics and Si14.

Presentations by Oracle employees:

Tuesday Dec 13, 2011

Java SE Embedded 7u2 Released

The Java SE Embedded team continues to follow the mainline JDK and has shipped their 7u2 and 6u30 releases. These releases include new ports to Linux on embedded PPC devices, and support for the server (C2) compiler on ARM. The latter improves Java performance on ARM systems by approximately 20-40%. You can find the downloads and release notes (7u2, 6u30) on the Oracle OTN web site.

Oracle's longer term strategy for Java on Embedded devices - as shared at JavaOne 2011 - is to converge the Java ME/CDC and Java SE Embedded platforms into one and use Project Jigsaw to produce a base module based on JDK 8 that requires no more than approximately 10 MB ROM. We also intend to port JavaFX to Linux on ARM for a coherent client story ranging from medium sized embedded devices to normal laptops and desktops.

About

Henrik Stahl is VP of Product Management in the Java Platform Group at Oracle, and is responsible for product strategy for Java ME and SE.

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