Professional vs Passionate Software

I just read this kickass blog about Professional vs Passionate software/product.

I usually say "kickass" or "kewl" to describe products that I like instead of f\*\*king cool that the author prefers. Nevertheless, the author has nailed it - products do not capture  user's imagination if they are "professional". They need to be f\*\*king cool. For every iPod out there, there are a bunch of mp3 players that I cannot remember, let alone get off my butt to go to the store to buy it. MacBook Pro actually made my wife get out and buy it.

Project BlackBox seems to f\*\*king cool. This term of endearment ;-) has created a controversy for Tim Bray when he used f\*\*king cool to describe Project Blacbox. (Tim's blog describing his verbage :-) ). You know something is cool when people are talking about around the water cooler.

For a product to be f\*\*king cool - design matters period. A good design shows up in apple products (Apple Design Pro site) or something as simple as creating kickass presentation slides.

Here are some companies that I think have created or will create kickass products:

Apple, BMW, Amazon, Sony (with the walkman), Nintendo ( I bet -their new generation consoles that do not make me learn super hard combinations is going to kick xbox and ps3 ass).

 I will like to hear which companies and products that you liked...


Comments:

Tim Bray also thinks that PHP scales better than Java, so perhaps he's not the best person to use as a reference. You can cook a fucking great steak from good meat from a cow that was intellectually mediocre at best. If you can organize a kitchen to cook a few hundred of them a night, you are a competent restaurant cook. If you can cook three of them after work, you're a great dad/mom/partner. You can be a passionate cook or parent, or not. It's not a simple dichotomy. What is this American obsession with simple answers?

Posted by Mikael Gueck on November 10, 2006 at 11:27 AM PST #

You seem to think I implied a good design as panacea for all product ills or needs. Certainly it is not as simple as that but a good design seems like a good step towards a great product. It is not a simple answer to complex question but it is one of the first questions to be answered while making a great product.

Posted by Harpreet Singh on November 11, 2006 at 03:25 AM PST #

To clarify, I agree with you but don't think that your reasoning follows from the premises you quoted. It was the premises I was criticizing, the Paul Graham start-up vs. professional false dichotomy. I already described my favourite product. Once upon a time I was dissatisfied with the food an assistant cook had burned at this pretty small restaurant behind the Ateneum museum. I gave voice to my thoughts, but the waiter wasn't interested. The owner was listening in behind the wall, and from the next time I visited the restaurant, he used me as a guinea pig for fine tuning his pepper-cream sauce for years, until I got pretty fat and the restaurant got pretty full most nights. That was a kick-ass pepper-cream sauce receipe, it was tailored to a single customer, no compromises, but it ended up pleasing tens of thousands. Mmm...

Posted by Mikael Gueck on November 11, 2006 at 05:24 AM PST #

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

harpreet

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today