Monday Dec 08, 2014

The Best Infrastructure for Your Private Cloud

There is still a Conventional Wisdom in IT that the way to architect private clouds is to use generic X86 servers, with open source software such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and virtualization software such as VMware. Oracle's technology creates a New Wisdom, in which a better infrastructure for building private clouds provides higher efficiency, more agility and flexibility, and ultimately better value.

Oracle's winning technology acts on three areas:

  • decreases the overhead on creating and running Virtual Machines (VMs), through a layered virtualization model
  • increases the number of VMs supported per server, while eliminating oversubscription, through processors with high hardware thread density
  • increases the agility and flexibility of managing Virtual Machine life cycle, while allowing for compliance guarantees

This blog entry describes in more detail how this is accomplished.

Tuesday Nov 25, 2014

The Best Virtualization and Life Cycle Management for Private Clouds

Virtualization started as a means for server consolidation in order to obtain better efficiency in IT infrastructure. Cost savings came from increased system utilization and reduced server hardware needed to support multiple workloads. However, as private clouds were increasingly deployed in modern data centers, there has been a sharp increase in the number of Virtual Machines that are managed. Many of these clouds have been architected with a hypervisor model supporting many operating system copies. This model actually creates issues of poor efficiency and high management overhead. In other words, IT managers are back again looking at the issue of how to improve the efficiency in their clouds. 

This blog entry describes how Oracle's layered virtualization model, and state-of-the-art life-cycle management, provides the ideal foundation for building efficient private clouds.


Thursday Oct 16, 2014

SPARC and Solaris Leadership in Security

Oracle’s SPARC systems and Oracle Solaris OS are co-engineered to provide efficient secure technology. SPARC security uses hardware accelerators to deliver leading performance.

Oracle leads in providing encryption and policy-based key management that ensure data protection for cloud and virtual environments. Oracle has proved its dramatic security performance advantages through rigorous testing. In the cloud a huge amount data needs to be encrypted. For data at rest, AES block-level encryption is FIPS 140-2 certified to support U.S. government agencies. The end-to-end performance of all system components that make up a virtualized environment.

AES Security Performance (per chip)

Figure 1. SPARC T5-2 is 2.5x faster on AES-128-CBC versus the best x86 E5 v2 result (with AES-NI) and 4.6x faster versus the IBM POWER8 result.

This result demonstrates the superiority of Oracle’s SPARC T5 processors with Oracle Solaris for security and demonstrates the leadership SPARC servers provide in large-scale secure cloud environments. With Solaris 11.2 command compliance provides system assessments against security/compliance benchmarks and generates actionable reports.

SPARC Customer Successes
Large Mobile TeleCommunications Provider
utilizing the SPARC T5-2 server, Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center realized the benefits of the feature functionality of Oracle core technology and the RAS capabilities of SPARC/Solaris.

Global Investment Management Firm needed to provide a platform to meet business needs during spikes and growth and encryption to meet 2016 requirements. The customer consolidated from 60 servers to just a few racks of SPARC T5-2, T5-4 and T5-8’s to provide Infrastructure as a service.

SPARC T5-2 Server
Utilizing modular design architecture and powered by either one or two SPARC T5 processors—Oracle’s most powerful SPARC processors ever—the SPARC T5-2 server delivers exceptional single- and multi-thread performance. With 16 cores and 16 memory slots per SPARC T5 processor, the SPARC T5-2 server provides extreme compute density, with up to 32 cores and 1 TB of system memory within a 3U enclosure. Oracle has also proven that the SPARC T5-2 is the fastest server for Java applications, which is critical in many cloud deployments. The SPARC T5-2 is 1.8x faster than the best Intel 2-chip x86 E5 v2 Ivy-Bridge-based Cisco UCS C240 M3 server.

Conclusion
The SPARC T5 server running Oracle Solaris 11 automatically utilizes hardware accelerators for security. Combined with the Oracle virtualization technologies such as the Oracle VM Server for SPARC and Oracle Solaris Zones, which provide a low overhead, flexible, scalable, manageable and secure virtualization environment with no extra cost for customers that have Oracle premier support.

For more information about SPARC and Solaris performance, please visit http://www.oracle.com/benchmarks.



Benchmark Disclosures
1) SPARC, x86 and POWER8 security performance: https://blogs.oracle.com/BestPerf/entry/20130925_crypto_t5_2_x4 and www.ibm.com/developerworks/ibmi/library/i-ibmi-7_2-and-ibm-power8 (fig 2)
2) SPARC T5-2 114,492 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 43,963 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS; Cisco UCS C240 M3 63,079 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 23,797 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS.

Sunday Sep 07, 2014

Two Ways IBM Has Over-promised and Under-delivered with POWER8 to Date

IBM launched its first POWER8 systems in April 2014. So now that the dust has settled and the first systems have started shipping, let’s take stock of what IBM actually delivered with POWER8.

POWER8 Is More Than a Year Late
IBM has shown on previous roadmaps that it has a 3-year release cycle for new POWER generations. Following that cadence, IBM clearly missed its POWER8 release by more than a year, given that POWER7 systems started shipping the Spring of 2010 and the first POWER8 systems started shipping June 2014. 

Where Is AIX8?
We give IBM marketing credit for trying to re-spin a patched AIX7.1 (TL3 released November 2013) as their next generation OS, but the fact of the matter is that all IBM has added to the latest patch is basic enablement for the new hardware and rejigger their feature packaging a bit (e.g., more is now included in the higher cost enterprise edition of the OS).  

Further, there are few if any incremental functional improvements and no major new features planned even for its next impending patch release (TL4), which according to IBM’s AIX release history is still not yet available as of July 2014. However, the really critical point for anyone considering POWER8 is that AIX8 isn’t even on IBM’s public roadmap yet. Where is AIX8 and what exactly will IBM deliver?


FACT: AIX 7 TL3 last November just released “WPAR alt-disk install and rollback”. Solaris has provided similar technology, called Live Upgrade, since Solaris 10 was released in 2005.

FACT: Apparently per IBM’s roadmaps, AIX does not yet support SR-IOV, as it is shown as a future still, while Solaris has supported SR-IOV since 2010.

FACT: Consider all of the advantages Oracle just released in Solaris 11.2. Click here to see what’s new in 11.2. Just to give some examples…

  • Centralized cloud management with Oracle's OpenStack distribution. Integrated at the core of Oracle Solaris 11.2, deploy a private cloud instance in minutes instead of weeks.
  • Secure and agile application provisioning in the cloud with Unified Archives, a new archive format that allows total portability between bare metal and virtualized systems. Instant cloning in the cloud when you need it, to scale out or for reliable disaster recovery in emergencies.
  • No compromise virtualization with Oracle Solaris Zones enhanced. Oracle Solaris 11.2 brings an even greater level of flexibility with independent and isolated Kernel Zones.
  • Maintain SLAs with application driven Software Defined Networking, extending the network virtualization capabilities of Oracle Solaris. Elastic Virtual Switching ensures dynamic networks across your cloud environment with unprecedented agility.
  • Lower the effort of meeting compliance with an integrated and automated checking and report generation tool, reducing the time needed for compliance review by as much as 10x.

Tuesday Jun 10, 2014

The Ideal Platform for Oracle Database 12c In-Memory and in-memory Applications

Oracle SuperClusterOracle's SPARC M6 and T5 servers, Oracle Solaris, Oracle VM Server for SPARC, and Oracle Enterprise Manager have been co-engineered with Oracle Database and Oracle applications to provide maximum In-Memory performance, scalability, efficiency and reliability for the most critical and demanding enterprise deployments. The In-Memory option for the Oracle Database 12c, which has just been released, has been specifically optimized for SPARC servers running Oracle Solaris.


The unique combination of Oracle's M6 32 Terabytes Big Memory Machine and Oracle Database 12c In-Memory demonstrates 2X increase in OLTP performance and 100X increase in analytics response times, allowing complex analysis of incredibly large data sets at the speed of thought. Numerous unique enhancements, including the large cache on the SPARC M6 processor, massive 32 TB of memory, uniform memory access architecture, Oracle Solaris high-performance kernel, and Oracle Database SGA optimization, result in orders of magnitude better transaction processing speeds across a range of in-memory workloads.

[Read More]

Friday May 02, 2014

SPARC and Solaris Leadership in the Cloud

Oracle’s SPARC systems and Solaris OS are co-engineered to provide efficient virtualization technology. SPARC virtualization is “Built into Firmware” which reduces costs and improves performance.

Oracle has proved its virtualization performance advantages through rigorous public testing. SPEC1, the performance standards group, defined the SPECvirt_sc2010 benchmark to uniformly measure the end-to-end performance of all system components that make up a virtualized environment. The SPECvirt_sc2012 benchmark is a good indicator of virtualization performance, which is critical for any cloud environment.

Virtualization Performance


Figure 1. SPARC T5-2 is 2.3x faster in the SPECvirt_sc2010 benchmark versus the best VMware result on an HP BL620c G7 two-processor x86-based blade server.

Oracle’s SPARC T5-2 server running Oracle Solaris 11 delivered a two-socket world-record SPECvirt_sc2010 result of 4270 @ 264 VMs. This result demonstrates the superiority of Oracle’s SPARC T5 processors with Oracle Solaris virtualization and demonstrates the leadership SPARC servers provide in large-scale environments.

SPARC Customer Successes

Large Communications Provider utilizing the Oracle Optimized Solution for Enterprise Cloud Infrastructure, running on SPARC T5 Servers, realized 2.5x faster virtual server deployment versus bare metal for faster time-to-user and administrative productivity.

Regional Water Company realized 7x better cost/performance for virtualized Java, and 2x faster data warehouse performance and order-entry transactions than IBM running Oracle Solaris, Database, Applications and Middleware on SPARC T5 servers with Oracle VM for SPARC versus competitive systems.

Oil and Gas Company running Oracle Database, PeopleSoft, and SAP on Oracle SPARC T5 servers achieved 3x faster provisioning of new services and OPEX savings of $2.8M using Oracle VM for SPARC.

Oracle SPARC T5-2 Server


Utilizing modular design architecture and powered by either one or two SPARC T5 processors—Oracle’s most powerful SPARC processors ever—the SPARC T5-2 server delivers exceptional single- and multi-thread performance. With 16 cores and 16 memory slots per SPARC T5 processor, the SPARC T5-2 server provides extreme compute density, with up to 32 cores and 1 TB of system memory within a 3U enclosure. Oracle has also proven that the SPARC T5-2 is the fastest server for Java applications, which is critical in many cloud deployments. The SPARC T5-2 is 1.8x faster than the best Intel 2-chip x86 E5 v2 Ivy-Bridge-based Cisco UCS C240 M3 server.2

Conclusion
The SPARC T5 server running Oracle Solaris 11 utilizes embedded virtualization products, such as the Oracle VM Server for SPARC and Oracle Solaris Zones, which provide a low overhead, flexible, scalable and manageable virtualization environment with no extra cost for customers that have Oracle premier support.

For more information about SPARC and Solaris performance, please visit http://www.oracle.com/benchmarks.

Benchmark Disclosures
1) SPEC and the benchmark names SPECvirt_sc are registered trademarks of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Results from http://www.spec.org as of 3/6/2014. Solaris SPARC T5-2, SPECvirt_sc2010 4270 @ 264 VMs; VMware ESXi4.1 HP Proliant BL620c G7, SPECvirt_sc2010 1878 @ 120 VMs.

2) SPARC T5-2 114,492 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 43,963 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS; Cisco UCS C240 M3 63,079 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 23,797 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS.


This blog post is provided for information purposes only, and the contents hereof are subject to change without notice. This post is not warranted to be error-free, nor subject to any other warranties or conditions, whether expressed orally or implied in law, including implied warranties and conditions of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. We specifically disclaim any liability with respect to this document, and no contractual obligations are formed either directly or indirectly by this post. This post may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without our prior written permission.

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Intel and Intel Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. All SPARC trademarks are used under license and are trademarks or registered trademarks of SPARC International, Inc. AMD, Opteron, the AMD logo, and the AMD Opteron logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

Friday Apr 25, 2014

Is IBM POWER8 a Smart(er) Choice?


On Wednesday, April 23, IBM announced new POWER8 systems at the OpenPower Forum. But IBM customers might be disappointed, as it appears that IBM is shifting its strategic R&D focus to Linux on POWER. IBM recently stated that they will “significantly reposition POWER8” and that they are trying to displace x86 with POWER8 in hyperscale/scale-out data center deployments. IBM seems to be re-aligning POWER8 to cover lost ground since it decided to de-invest in x86 entirely, while Oracle has instead adopted the strategy of adding/building value for enterprise environments and adding functionality to enhance customer experience (our software in silicon with SPARC processors, Oracle Solaris enhancements and Engineered Systems as examples). Ultimately IBM's strategy may lower the starting price, but IBM may not be able to sustain the model nor add significant net-new value longer term with POWER or AIX.

This represents a major shift in strategy and potentially a reduced investment in POWER AIX for the enterprise.

IBM’s hardware business is in a state of major transition. Is hardware even strategic to IBM? 

"They used to be a leader. Now they sell one business after the next. That is not a way to grow," said Fred Hickey, editor of The High-Tech Strategist newsletter who has followed IBM for 30 years. There is clear evidence that IBM is reducing investment in  hardware:

  • IBM sold their PC and Workstation business to Lenovo in 2005
  • IBM just closed their deal to sell off its x86 server business to Lenovo
  • IBM has retained Goldman Sachs to find a buyer for their chip fabrication facilities
  • IBM delivered only two POWER updates in the last four years
  • IBM doesn’t have a public POWER roadmap beyond POWER8 and AIX8

On the other hand, Oracle is doubling down on integrated hardware and software investments to support a long-term innovation roadmap and increased customer value:

  • Oracle increased investment in SPARC and Oracle Solaris delivering five generations of SPARC processors in four years, and doubling performance with each release
  • Oracle plans to release Solaris 11.2 next week, the world’s first cloud operating system coupled with the benefits of advanced virtualization, software-defined networking, and OpenStack integration
  • The SPARC roadmap now shows three future generations of SPARC processors through 2019
  • Oracle continues to invest heavily in a broad portfolio of Engineered Systems to simplify IT

Lots of Unanswered Questions
IBM leaves a lot of unanswered questions on what is going to happen next and whether its new strategy will add any real value:

  • IBM’s POWER strategy is complex and unclear with its new focus in the entry/scale-out market vs. the enterprise. What do current AIX/POWER customers do?
  • Can IBM and the OpenPOWER consortium deliver value with a complex multi-year effort to build a new ecosystem around design, manufacturing and software for the x86/scale out segment?
  • IBM is offering customers new hardware for Linux. What are the bottom line costs and benefits for migrating Linux applications running on x86 to POWER8? What is the value for Linux on POWER over x86? 
  • How does IBM plan on implementing future hardware/software optimization, i.e., PureSystems and PureFLEX, while at the same time pursuing a purely OpenStack model for POWER8? For that matter, what is IBM’s current strategy for PureSystems, given that it did not announce POWER8 Flex nodes and did not mention PureSystems at its recent earnings?

Given this radical new strategy and all the surrounding uncertainty and potential risk, do customers really want to continue to invest in POWER8 and AIX?

Stay tuned for more analysis, as IBM reveals more details about POWER8.


The following is intended to outline our general product direction. It is intended for information purposes only, and may not be incorporated into any contract. It is not a commitment to deliver any material, code, or functionality, and should not be relied upon in making purchasing decisions. The development, release, and timing of any features or functionality described for Oracle’s products remains at the sole discretion of Oracle.

Thursday Feb 27, 2014

Migrate from AIX to Oracle Solaris in 4 Easy Steps

Do you fear migration downtime for your always-on applications and increase in already long IT projects backlog? Overdue for an upgrade on your AIX/Power systems running Oracle technology and/or Oracle applications?

Simplify the Migration of Oracle Database and Oracle Applications from AIX to Oracle Solaris is a new white paper that explains in detail how to move from AIX to Oracle Solaris. It also has published results of Oracle Database migrations from AIX to Solaris, including the effort, duration, and benefits from actual systems migrations. Hear first-hand from customers who have simplified operations and benefited from UNIX advantages, by moving off IBM AIX systems onto Oracle’s cutting edge Oracle Solaris-powered platforms.

In four simple steps, you can migrate from AIX to Oracle Solaris and take advantage of Oracle’s “Hardware and Software Engineered to Work Together” to reduce cost, risk and improve the productivity of your application and business systems.

To learn more on AIX to Solaris Migration, visit oracle.com/aixtosolaris.

Tuesday Nov 20, 2012

SPARC at 25: Past, Present and Future

Join us online to celebrate a quarter-century of innovation. Watch Scott McNealy, Bill Joy, and Andy Bechtolsheim along with other significant SPARC contributors discuss the challenges and rewards of consistently redefining the limits of enterprise IT. Hear Mark Hurd and John Fowler talk about the aggressive plans for SPARC’s future. All of this was recently captured in video at the SPARC anniversary event held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.

SPARC Anniversary

In addition to getting unique insights from the people behind 25 years of SPARC technology, you can access exclusive content and resources, read case studies and e-Books, view webcasts and infographics, and more.

Be sure to take some time to rediscover why and how SPARC was developed, the considerable impact it had on the entire IT industry, and the continuing innovations coming in the future.
http://www.oracle.com/go/?&Src=7618691&Act=721&pcode=WWMK12044691MPP051

Thursday Nov 15, 2012

The SPARC SuperCluster

Oracle has been providing a lead in the Engineered Systems business for quite a while now, in accordance with the motto "Hardware and Software Engineered to Work Together." Indeed it is hard to find a better definition of these systems. 

Allow me to summarize the idea. It is: 

  • Build a compute platform optimized to run your technologies
  • Develop application aware, intelligently caching storage components
  • Take an impressively fast network technology interconnecting it with the compute nodes
  • Tune the application to scale with the nodes to yet unseen performance
  • Reduce the amount of data moving via compression
  • Provide this all in a pre-integrated single product with a single-pane management interface

All these ideas have been around in IT for quite some time now. The real Oracle advantage is adding the last one to put these all together. Oracle has built quite a portfolio of Engineered Systems, to run its technologies - and run those like they never ran before. In this post I'll focus on one of them that serves as a consolidation demigod, a general purpose engineered system. 

As you probably have guessed, I am talking about the SPARC SuperCluster. It has many great features inherited from its predecessors, and it adds several new ones. Allow me to pick out and elaborate about some of the most interesting ones from a technological point of view. 

The SPARC SuperCluster

I. It is the SPARC SuperCluster T4-4. That is, as compute nodes, it includes SPARC T4-4 servers that we learned to appreciate and respect for their features:

  • The SPARC T4 CPUs:
    • Each CPU has 8 cores, each core runs 8 threads. The SPARC T4-4 servers have 4 sockets. That is, a single compute node can in parallel, simultaneouslyexecute 256 threads. Now, a full-rack SPARC SuperCluster has 4 of these servers on board. Remember the keyword demigod. 
    • While retaining the forerunner SPARC T3's exceptional throughput, the SPARC T4 CPUs raise the bar with single performance too - a humble 5x better one than their ancestors. 
      • actually, the SPARC T4 CPU cores run in both single-threaded and multi-threaded mode, and switch between these two on-the-fly, fulfilling not only single-threaded OR multi-threaded applications' needs, but even mixed requirements (like in database workloads!).
    • Data security, anyone? Every SPARC T4 CPU core has a built-in encryption engine, that is, encryption algorithms cast into silicon
    • A PCI controller right on the chip for customers who need I/O performance. 
  • Built-in, no-cost Virtualization: 
    • Oracle VM for SPARC (the former LDoms or Logical Domains) is not a server-emulation virtualization technology but rather a serverpartitioning one, the hypervisor runs in the server firmware, and all the VMs' HW resources (I/O, CPU, memory) are accessed natively, without performance overhead. 
    • This enables customers to run a number of Solaris 10 and Solaris 11 VMs separated, independent of each other within a physical server

II. For Database performance, it includes Exadata Storage Cells - one of the main reasons why the Exadata Database Machine performs at diabolic speed. What makes them important?

  • They provide DB backend storage for your Oracle Databases to run on the SPARC SuperCluster, that is what they are built and tuned for DB performance. 
  • These storage cells are SQL-aware
    • That is, if a SPARC T4 database compute node executes a query, it doesn't simply request tons of raw datablocks from the storage, filters the received data, and throws away most of it where the statement doesn't apply, but provides the SQL query to the storage node too. The storage cell software speaks SQL, that is, it is able to prefilter and through that transfer only the relevant data. With this, the traffic between database nodes and storage cells is reduced immensely. Less I/O is a good thing - as they say, all the CPUs of the world do one thing just as fast as any other - and that is waiting for I/O. 
    • They don't only pre-filter, but also provide data preprocessing features - e.g. if a DB-node requests an aggregate of data, they can calculate it, and handover only the results, not the whole set. Again, less data to transfer. 
  • They support the magical HCC, (Hybrid Columnar Compression). That is, data can be stored in a precompressed form on the storage. Less data to transfer. 
  • Of course one can't simply rely on disks for performance, there is Flash Storage included there for caching. 

III. The low latency, high-speed backbone network: InfiniBand, that interconnects all the members with:

  • Real High Speed: 40 Gbit/s. Full Duplex, of course. Oh, and a really low latency. 
  • RDMA. Remote Direct Memory Access. This technology allows the DB nodes to do exactly that. Remotely, directly placing SQL commands into the Memory of the storage cells. Dodging all the network-stack bottlenecks, avoiding overhead, placing requests directly into the process queue. 
  • You can also run IP over InfiniBand if you please - that's the way the compute nodes can communicate with each other. 

IV. Including a general-purpose storage too: the ZFSSA, which is a unified storage, providing NAS and SAN access too, with the following features: 

  • NFS over RDMA over InfiniBand. Nothing is faster network-filesystem-wise. 
  • All the ZFS features onboard, hybrid storage pools, compression, deduplication, snapshot, replication, NFS and CIFS shares
  • Storageheads in a HA-Cluster configuration providing availability of the data 
  • DTrace Live Analytics in a web-based Administration UI
  • Being a general purpose application data storage for your non-database applications running on the SPARC SuperCluster over whichever protocol they prefer, easily replicating, snapshotting, cloning data for them. 

There's a lot of great technology included in Oracle's SPARC SuperCluster, we have talked its interior through. As for external scalability: you can start with a half- of full- rack SPARC SuperCluster, and scale out to several racks - that is, stacking not separate full-rack SPARC SuperClusters, but extending always one large instance of the size of several full-racks. Yes, over InfiniBand network. Add racks as you grow. 

What technologies shall run on it? SPARC SuperCluster is a general purpose scaleout consolidation/cloud environment. You can run Oracle Databases with RAC scaling, or Oracle Weblogic (end enjoy the SPARC T4's advantages to run Java). Remember, Oracle technologies have been integrated with the Oracle Engineered Systems - this is the Oracle on Oracle advantage. But you can run other software environments such as SAP if you please too. Run any application that runs on Oracle Solaris 10 or Solaris 11. Separate them in Virtual Machines, or even Oracle Solaris Zones, monitor and manage those from a central UI.

Here the key takeaways once again:

The SPARC SuperCluster:

  • Is a pre-integrated Engineered System
  • Contains SPARC T4-4 servers with built-in virtualization, cryptography, dynamic threading
  • Contains the Exadata storage cells that intelligently offload the burden of the DB-nodes 
  • Contains a highly available ZFS Storage Appliance, that provides SAN/NAS storage in a unified way
  • Combines all these elements over a high-speed, low-latency backbone network implemented with InfiniBand
  • Can grow from a single half-rack to several full-rack size
  • Supports the consolidation of hundreds of applications

To summarize: All these technologies are great by themselves, but the real value is like in every other Oracle Engineered System: Integration. All these technologies are tuned to perform together. Together they are way more than the sum of all - and a careful and actually very time consuming integration process is necessary to orchestrate all these for performance. The SPARC SuperCluster's goal is to enable infrastructure operations and offer a pre-integrated solution that can be architected and delivered in hours instead of months of evaluations and tests. The tedious and most importantly time and resource consuming part of the work - testing and evaluating - has been done. 

Now go, provide services.  

-- charlie  

[Read More]

Thursday Oct 04, 2012

Bring 2 GB Large Pages to Solaris 10

Few facts:

  • 8 KB is the default page size on Oracle Solaris 10 and 11 as of this writing
  • Both hardware and software must have support for 2 GB large pages
  • SPARC T4 processors are capable of supporting 2 GB pages
  • Oracle Solaris 11 kernel has in-built support for 2 GB pages
  • Oracle Solaris 10 has no default support for 2 GB pages
  • Memory intensive 64-bit applications may benefit the most from using 2 GB pages

Prerequisites:

Steps to enable 2 GB large pages on Oracle Solaris 10:

  1. Install the latest kernel patch or ensure that 147440-04 or later was installed

  2. Add the following line to /etc/system and reboot
    • set max_uheap_lpsize=0x80000000

  3. Finally check the output of the following command when the system is back online
    • pagesize -a

    eg.,
    % pagesize -a
    8192		<-- 8K
    65536		<-- 64K
    4194304		<-- 4M
    268435456	<-- 256M
    2147483648	<-- 2G
    
    % uname -a
    SunOS jar-jar 5.10 Generic_147440-21 sun4v sparc sun4v
    

Also See:

Friday Aug 24, 2012

Enterprise Cloud Infrastructure for Dummies eBook

Are you considering "going to the cloud" as a way to cut IT costs and maximize your virtualization investments? Then Enterprise Cloud Infrastructure for Dummies is a no-nonsense guide to help you navigate this hot topic. This user friendly guide explains how to cut through the noise and take advantage of integrated virtualization and management tools to implement a cloud infrastructure that not only lowers operational costs but that can easily adapt and scale to run a broad range of application services safely and securely.

This e-book will serve as a valuable Cloud computing guide covering important topics such as:

p_dlg_id=11847803&src=7618000&Act=8" title="DOWNLOAD">Download your exclusive copy of Enterprise Cloud Infrastructure, Oracle Special Edition today.

Enterprise Cloud Infrastructure, Oracle Special Edition

About

Oracle engineers hardware and software to work together in the cloud and in your data center. For more information about Oracle (NASDAQ:ORCL), visit www.oracle.com.

Search

Archives
« April 2015
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
   
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
  
       
Today