Friday Feb 27, 2015

Introducing Oracle's Netra Modular System (NMS)

Introducing Oracle's Netra Modular System (NMS), a new systems architecture which merges bladed system concepts with rack mount server architectures, to create a new innovative next generation platform. We are really excited to finally announce this product which has been under development for several years. Where to begin? One of the driving design objectives has been to realize all the benefits that people like with bladed systems, like ease of scale with plug and play bladed servers; but to eliminate the constraints and issues that people have with bladed systems, such as limited blade area, cooling issues and technology evolution challenges. I'm happy to say that we've achieved that goal and then some. 


We also wanted to create a new architecture which addresses the new challenges in today's modern data center. Rapid scale, both physically and virtually is required. In Netra's traditional market, communications network data centers, an extension to commercial data center virtualization called Network Functions Virtualization is the hot topic for new infrastructure roll out. Using this approach to implementing traditional communications network functions holds the promise of providing much greater flexibility and rapid scale of network services while reducing hardware device costs as some functions become software based on general purpose servers. We believe Netra Modular System is a very attractive foundation platform for Network Function Virtualization Infrastructure.


You can see a demonstration of Netra Modular System at Mobile World Congress 2015 in Barcelona, Spain, Hall 3, Stand 3B20 - between March 2-5, 2015.

Monday Feb 09, 2015

Oracle to Receive IEEE Milestone Award for SPARC RISC Architecture

The SPARC Architecture IEEE Milestone Plaque unveiling recognizing the technological achievements of the SPARC RISC Architecture for innovation and excellence will be held on February 13, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. in the lobby of the Clock Tower on Oracle’s Santa Clara Campus. The plaque unveiling will be preceded by a dedication ceremony in the Oracle Auditorium beginning at 10:00 a.m. Speakers will include IEEE 2015 President Howard Michel, John Fowler, Executive Vice President, Systems, Oracle, and Professor David Patterson along with others instrumental in shaping the success of this highly impactful technology.


A History of Record Performance and Mission Critical Enterprise Capabilities
Sun Microsystems first introduced SPARC (Scalable Processor Architecture) RISC (Reduced Instruction-Set Computing) in 1987. Over the course of its life, the SPARC processor architecture has powered millions of servers and workstations, and is still a leading and highly valued technology today.
Closely integrated with the Oracle Solaris operating system, Oracle's SPARC-based systems provide customers extreme performance to maximize the up-time and ROI of mission-critical enterprise applications and cloud services—at a fraction of the cost of mainframe computers. With a long history of record-breaking performance, SPARC-based systems have achieved over 450 record benchmarks, with 32 currently standing. Today, the SPARC processor family is used in Oracle's enterprise servers to create architectures that are optimized for a powerful mix of applications, from CRM systems and Java/Web middleware infrastructure applications to mission-critical ERP and backend OLTP/data warehousing enterprise applications that depend on high availability and scalability.

SPARC Innovations Continue
Building on over 27 years of innovations and a long list of "firsts," Oracle continues to engineer record-breaking SPARC-based systems running Oracle Solaris. As first announced at Hot Chips 2014, Oracle’s new and revolutionary Software in Silicon technology hardwires key software processes directly onto the processor. Software in Silicon accelerates functions running on special engines on the processor's silicon, separate from its cores, and speeds up application performance while retaining the overall functionality of the processor.  

To attend the SPARC Architecture IEEE Milestone Plaque unveiling please register here.

Tuesday Nov 18, 2014

Are Two HPs Better Than One?

HP recently announced plans to split into two separate companies. One company will target enterprise customers (data center infrastructures), the other will focus on the client side (consumers). This move has sparked a series of questions among financial and industry analysts alike: What will it mean to customers who currently hold enterprise agreements or other company-wide contracts with HP products and services? HP stated the goal to split the company was to become profitable again, however, very few details were provided around HP's planned execution. "This would not have been possible three years ago," Whitman said, referring to a proposal to spin off PCs in 2011.

Some analysts expressed skepticism about the latest move. Barclays analysts recently noted that the sudden announcement in 2011 was disruptive to HP's sales, its sales force and demand. "If the (latest) decision by HP isn't well communicated or is not well executed, the negative share shifts could be material," they said in a note. (footnote 1)

Also consider Oracle’s investment in R&D on average from 2010-2013 as compared to Hewlett-Packard’s:
Oracle FY12 $5.0B vs. HP FY12 $3.2B:
(footnote 2)

Oracle spent ~12% of revenue into R&D, contrast that with HP, which spent $3.2B/year on average from FY2010-FY2013, constituting a mere 2.6% of revenue.

And that is before this recent split. Will HP still have the same resources to spend on R&D in the future as it does today? With declining revenues for 11 of the past 12 quarters, the same leaders running the same businesses, and no details provided yet to fix their underlying problems, one could ask if this split was to meet the expectations of Wall Street. How exactly is this a win for customers and not just investors? How will HP cross-integrate and innovate now as two separate companies? It was not that long ago when HP touted the combined portfolio of its consumer and enterprise businesses as a competitive differentiator.

In contrast to HP, Oracle is clearly investing in R&D and continuing to innovate with expanded server and hardware offerings with published and committed roadmaps to ultimately SIMPLIFY IT and increase customer value.


Chart 1 source: http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/investor-relations/index.htm http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_23437659/exclusive-hp-hewlett-packard-slashed-rd-spending-fraction-norms
Chart 2 source: http://www.slideshare.net/Pronq/hp-mobility-perspective-at-hp-world-congress-2014
Footnote 1: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/06/us-hp-restructuring-idUSKCN0HV0U720141006
Footnote 2: http://www.work-bench.com/blog/2014/09/03/analyzing-r&d-and-m&a-activity-by-legacy-tech-vendors/

Thursday Oct 23, 2014

Game Changing Innovation with Power8?

On Monday, October 12, IBM announced their first Power8-based enterprise class systems and yet still did not deliver the full realization of its 12-core Power8 processor, previewed by IBM in August 2013. Potential customers should also really consider IBM's lack of deep-level optimization, as compared to Oracle and SPARC.

By opening Power to partner co-development, IBM has lost much of its ability to retain control of deep-level optimizations. Consider that IBM agreed to pay Globalfoundries Inc. $1.5 billion to take an unprofitable chip-manufacturing unit off its hands. It now makes much more sense as to why IBM is investing in partner add-on capabilities through CAPI (Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface), such as chips from NVIDIA, instead of investing in its own software in silicon enhancements like Oracle. And while Oracle was busy acquiring Sun, Pillar, Xsigo and more, IBM was divesting its networking, hard disk, x86 server business and most recently their chip manufacturing unit. 


From a product feature standpoint, consider that CAPI lacks the true software in silicon (as Oracle is doing with SPARC/Solaris) approach and co-engineered Hardware + Software solutions (such as Oracle ECI Solution for SPARC), from a workload optimization and total business solution standpoint. Customers increasingly state that they want and need optimized solutions for their data centers to reduce complexity and simplify data center management, as well as resource utilization. They need this to drive their time to value; Oracle delivers. With CAPI, who is going to test, support, and optimize for key customer workload environments – IBM? NVIDIA?

Why Invest with Oracle?  

  • Oracle has proven massive investments in its hardware and software portfolios
  • Oracle Servers, OS, and Storage's publicly committed forward-looking roadmap
  • Oracle's full stack, including industry-leading software solutions, enabling deep integration with software in silicon that customers can leverage
  • Oracle enables your business transformation

What do you think? Are these game changing innovations from IBM?

Thursday Oct 16, 2014

SPARC and Solaris Leadership in Security

Oracle’s SPARC systems and Oracle Solaris OS are co-engineered to provide efficient secure technology. SPARC security uses hardware accelerators to deliver leading performance.

Oracle leads in providing encryption and policy-based key management that ensure data protection for cloud and virtual environments. Oracle has proved its dramatic security performance advantages through rigorous testing. In the cloud a huge amount data needs to be encrypted. For data at rest, AES block-level encryption is FIPS 140-2 certified to support U.S. government agencies. The end-to-end performance of all system components that make up a virtualized environment.

AES Security Performance (per chip)

Figure 1. SPARC T5-2 is 2.5x faster on AES-128-CBC versus the best x86 E5 v2 result (with AES-NI) and 4.6x faster versus the IBM POWER8 result.

This result demonstrates the superiority of Oracle’s SPARC T5 processors with Oracle Solaris for security and demonstrates the leadership SPARC servers provide in large-scale secure cloud environments. With Solaris 11.2 command compliance provides system assessments against security/compliance benchmarks and generates actionable reports.

SPARC Customer Successes
Large Mobile TeleCommunications Provider
utilizing the SPARC T5-2 server, Oracle Solaris 11 and Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center realized the benefits of the feature functionality of Oracle core technology and the RAS capabilities of SPARC/Solaris.

Global Investment Management Firm needed to provide a platform to meet business needs during spikes and growth and encryption to meet 2016 requirements. The customer consolidated from 60 servers to just a few racks of SPARC T5-2, T5-4 and T5-8’s to provide Infrastructure as a service.

SPARC T5-2 Server
Utilizing modular design architecture and powered by either one or two SPARC T5 processors—Oracle’s most powerful SPARC processors ever—the SPARC T5-2 server delivers exceptional single- and multi-thread performance. With 16 cores and 16 memory slots per SPARC T5 processor, the SPARC T5-2 server provides extreme compute density, with up to 32 cores and 1 TB of system memory within a 3U enclosure. Oracle has also proven that the SPARC T5-2 is the fastest server for Java applications, which is critical in many cloud deployments. The SPARC T5-2 is 1.8x faster than the best Intel 2-chip x86 E5 v2 Ivy-Bridge-based Cisco UCS C240 M3 server.

Conclusion
The SPARC T5 server running Oracle Solaris 11 automatically utilizes hardware accelerators for security. Combined with the Oracle virtualization technologies such as the Oracle VM Server for SPARC and Oracle Solaris Zones, which provide a low overhead, flexible, scalable, manageable and secure virtualization environment with no extra cost for customers that have Oracle premier support.

For more information about SPARC and Solaris performance, please visit http://www.oracle.com/benchmarks.



Benchmark Disclosures
1) SPARC, x86 and POWER8 security performance: https://blogs.oracle.com/BestPerf/entry/20130925_crypto_t5_2_x4 and www.ibm.com/developerworks/ibmi/library/i-ibmi-7_2-and-ibm-power8 (fig 2)
2) SPARC T5-2 114,492 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 43,963 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS; Cisco UCS C240 M3 63,079 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 23,797 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS.

Thursday Oct 09, 2014

SPARC It Up! M7 Promises Once in a Generation Innovation

Oracle's microprocessor received a lot of coverage at Oracle OpenWorld 2014. The extreme performance, efficiency and optimization gains will rewrite the rules for price and performance value, plus speed the time it takes to deploy technology. Masood Heydari, SVP of Hardware Development at Oracle, provided an update to the SPARC M7 roadmap, first revealed at the Hot Chips conference in August 2014.

Click here to view Masood's "SPARC Server Strategy and Roadmap" presentation.

Software in Silicon
Heydari explained, "The goal of our strategy is to make Oracle engineered systems running on SPARC the best systems on which to run Oracle applications, period. That means optimizing around the best execution environment, best reliability, best management, etc." He emphasized Oracle has innovated on this strategy by placing software functions directly into the processor, calling them "software in silicon," an Oracle phrase that’ll be repeated as products featuring M7 near release. This design approach is where specific software functions are performed in hardware, enabling applications and operations to run faster. For example;

SPARC will incorporate in-memory query acceleration engines that take over certain database search functions so that database queries "speed up query performance by 10x and spit out results at the speed of memory," according to Larry Ellison.

Ellison made his first public appearance as Oracle's CTO and executive chairman of the board. He talked about the importance of doing things differently when running a database in memory. "Within the acceleration engine is decompression. When you compress and decompress data, the ratio of reading the data is 10 to 20 times more frequent than loading the data in memory. The magic to speeding things up isn’t compression, but decompression. We're processing data that runs at 120GB/second. That's a shocking number," and equivalent to 64 CPU cores.  

The most important innovation in the M7 is its new memory protection features. The computer will notify the developer when an application is tampering with another application. This "always on" memory protection is hard-wired in the silicon to defend against memory violations, speeding up software development and resulting in more secure and available applications. 

"It means applications can only access the memory they're supposed to access. Otherwise, the hardware will stop them" Ellison said. "Even smart programmers make mistakes and those mistakes can be really hard to find. Those are some of the hardest bugs to find. The failures are intermittent; they're extremely hard to trap. They're extremely hard to trace. With memory protection, you can discover those bugs really early, so it saves you a fortune in finding really difficult bugs. But the cool thing about it is because it's in hardware, you can leave this memory protection on without paying any performance price."  

The upcoming SPARC M7 will be available across the Oracle server product line in 2015. Tell us, which M7 features or applications do you look forward to?  

To learn more about SPARC technology, click here.


Rick O'Herron is the director of content strategy in Oracle's brand communications team.   

Sunday Sep 07, 2014

Oracle’s Software in Silicon


Earlier this month at the Hot Chips Symposium on High Performance Chips, Oracle announced its next generation M7 processor designed to supercharge in-memory computing. The 32-core M7, ‘the biggest and baddest SPARC processor that either Sun Microsystems or Oracle has ever created’, as referred to by Timothy Prickett Morgan of Enterprise Tech, will offer huge performance advantages and includes Software in Silicon features for Application Acceleration Support on each core.

Learn more about Oracle’s Software in Silicon strategy at Oracle OpenWorld 2014 in San Francisco (September 28-October 2) when Rick Hetherington, VP Hardware Development, discusses the latest advancements being made in SPARC to dramatically increase application performance, availability, and security. Rick’s session, ‘Oracle Software in Silicon Technical Deep Dive’ reveals the details on the next generation chip as told by one of Oracle’s most seasoned and respected processor architects. This is a ‘must see’ session for those companies interested in being the first to master and fully take advantage of these next generation technologies.

For details on all of the Oracle OpenWorld Server sessions, demos and labs see Focus On Oracle Servers.

Wednesday Jun 11, 2014

Oracle’s New Memory-Optimized x86 Servers: Getting the Most Out of Oracle Database In-Memory

With the launch of Oracle Database In-Memory, it is now possible to perform real-time analytics operations on your business data as it exists at that moment – in the DRAM of the server – and immediately return completely current and consistent data. The Oracle Database In-Memory option dramatically accelerates the performance of analytics queries by storing data in a highly optimized columnar in-memory format.  This is a truly exciting advance in database technology.

As Larry Ellison mentioned in his recent webcast about Oracle Database In-Memory, queries run 100 times faster simply by throwing a switch.  But in order to get the most from the Oracle Database In-Memory option, the underlying server must also be memory-optimized.

This week Oracle announced new 4-socket and 8-socket x86 servers, the Sun Server X4-4 and Sun Server X4-8, both of which have been designed specifically for Oracle Database In-Memory.  These new servers use the fastest Intel® Xeon® E7 v2 processors and each subsystem has been designed to be the best for Oracle Database, from the memory, I/O and flash technologies right down to the system firmware.

Amongst these subsystems, one of the most important aspects we have optimized with the Sun Server X4-4 and Sun Server X4-8 are their memory subsystems.  The new In-Memory option makes it possible to select which parts of the database should be memory optimized.  You can choose to put a single column or table in memory or, if you can, put the whole database in memory.  The more, the better.  With 3 TB and 6 TB total memory capacity on the Sun Server X4-4 and Sun Server X4-8, respectively, you can memory-optimize more, if not your entire database.  


Sun Server X4-8 CMOD with 24 DIMM slots per socket (up to 192 DIMM slots per server)


But memory capacity is not the only important factor in selecting the best server platform for Oracle Database In-Memory.  As you put more of your database in memory, a critical performance metric known as memory bandwidth comes into play.  The total memory bandwidth for the server will dictate the rate in which data can be stored and retrieved from memory. 

In order to achieve real-time analysis of your data using Oracle Database In-Memory, even under heavy load, the server must be able to handle extreme memory workloads.  With that in mind, the Sun Server X4-8 was designed with the maximum possible memory bandwidth, providing over a terabyte per second of total memory bandwidth.  Likewise, the Sun Server X4-4 also provides extreme memory bandwidth in an even more compact form factor with over half a terabyte per second, providing customers with scalability and choice depending on the size of the database.

Beyond the memory subsystem, Oracle’s Sun Server X4-4 and Sun Server X4-8 systems provide other key technologies that enable Oracle Database to run at its best.  The Sun Server X4-4 allows for up 4.8 TB of internal, write-optimized PCIe flash while the Sun Server X4-8 allows for up to 6.4 TB of PCIe flash.  This enables dramatic acceleration of data inserts and updates to Oracle Database.  And with the new elastic computing capability of Oracle’s new x86 servers, server performance can be adapted to your specific Oracle Database workload to ensure that every last bit of processing power is utilized.

Because Oracle designs and tests its x86 servers specifically for Oracle workloads, we provide the highest possible performance and reliability when running Oracle Database.  To learn more about Sun Server X4-4 and Sun Server X4-8, you can find more details including data sheets and white papers here.


Josh Rosen is a Principal Product Manager for Oracle’s x86 servers, focusing on Oracle’s operating systems and software.  He previously spent more than a decade as a developer and architect of system management software. Josh has worked on system management for many of Oracle's hardware products ranging from the earliest blade systems to the latest Oracle x86 servers. 

Tuesday Jun 10, 2014

The Ideal Platform for Oracle Database 12c In-Memory and in-memory Applications

Oracle SuperClusterOracle's SPARC M6 and T5 servers, Oracle Solaris, Oracle VM Server for SPARC, and Oracle Enterprise Manager have been co-engineered with Oracle Database and Oracle applications to provide maximum In-Memory performance, scalability, efficiency and reliability for the most critical and demanding enterprise deployments. The In-Memory option for the Oracle Database 12c, which has just been released, has been specifically optimized for SPARC servers running Oracle Solaris.


The unique combination of Oracle's M6 32 Terabytes Big Memory Machine and Oracle Database 12c In-Memory demonstrates 2X increase in OLTP performance and 100X increase in analytics response times, allowing complex analysis of incredibly large data sets at the speed of thought. Numerous unique enhancements, including the large cache on the SPARC M6 processor, massive 32 TB of memory, uniform memory access architecture, Oracle Solaris high-performance kernel, and Oracle Database SGA optimization, result in orders of magnitude better transaction processing speeds across a range of in-memory workloads.

[Read More]

Tuesday Jun 03, 2014

Oracle’s Sun Server X4-8 with Built-in Elastic Computing

We are excited to announce the release of Oracle's new 8-socket server, Sun Server X4-8. It’s the most flexible 8-socket x86 server Oracle has ever designed, and also the most powerful. Not only does it use the fastest Intel® Xeon® E7 v2 processors, but also its memory, I/O and storage subsystems are all designed for maximum performance and throughput. Like its predecessor, the Sun Server X4-8 uses a “glueless” design that allows for maximum performance for Oracle Database, while also reducing power consumption and improving reliability.

Sun Server X4-8

The specs are pretty impressive. Sun Server X4-8 supports 120 cores (or 240 threads), 6 TB memory, 9.6 TB HDD capacity or 3.2 TB SSD capacity, contains 16 PCIe Gen 3 I/O expansion slots, and allows for up to 6.4 TB Sun Flash Accelerator F80 PCIe Cards. The Sun Server X4-8 is also the most dense x86 server with its 5U chassis, allowing 60% higher rack-level core and DIMM slot density than the competition. 

There has been a lot of innovation in Oracle’s x86 product line, but the latest and most significant is a capability called elastic computing. This new capability is built into each Sun Server X4-8.  

Elastic computing starts with the Intel processor. While Intel provides a wide range of processors each with a fixed combination of core count, operational frequency, and power consumption, customers have been forced to make tradeoffs when they select a particular processor. They have had to make educated guesses on which particular processor (core count/frequency/cache size) will be best suited for the workload they intend to execute on the server.

Oracle and Intel worked jointly to define a new processor, the Intel Xeon E7-8895 v2 for the Sun Server X4-8, that has unique characteristics and effectively combines the capabilities of three different Xeon processors into a single processor. Oracle system design engineers worked closely with Oracle’s operating system development teams to achieve the ability to vary the core count and operating frequency of the Xeon E7-8895 v2 processor with time without the need for a system level reboot. 

Performance Chart

Along with the new processor, enhancements have been made to the system BIOS, Oracle Solaris, and Oracle Linux, which allow the processors in the system to dynamically clock up to faster speeds as cores are disabled and to reach higher maximum turbo frequencies for the remaining active cores. One customer, a stock market trading company, will take advantage of the elastic computing capability of Sun Server X4-8 by repurposing servers between daytime stock trading activity and nighttime stock portfolio processing, daily, to achieve maximum performance of each workload.

To learn more about Sun Server X4-8, you can find more details including the data sheet and white papers here.

Josh Rosen is a Principal Product Manager for Oracle’s x86 servers, focusing on Oracle’s operating systems and software. He previously spent more than a decade as a developer and architect of system management software. Josh has worked on system management for many of Oracle's hardware products ranging from the earliest blade systems to the latest Oracle x86 servers.

Friday May 02, 2014

SPARC and Solaris Leadership in the Cloud

Oracle’s SPARC systems and Solaris OS are co-engineered to provide efficient virtualization technology. SPARC virtualization is “Built into Firmware” which reduces costs and improves performance.

Oracle has proved its virtualization performance advantages through rigorous public testing. SPEC1, the performance standards group, defined the SPECvirt_sc2010 benchmark to uniformly measure the end-to-end performance of all system components that make up a virtualized environment. The SPECvirt_sc2012 benchmark is a good indicator of virtualization performance, which is critical for any cloud environment.

Virtualization Performance


Figure 1. SPARC T5-2 is 2.3x faster in the SPECvirt_sc2010 benchmark versus the best VMware result on an HP BL620c G7 two-processor x86-based blade server.

Oracle’s SPARC T5-2 server running Oracle Solaris 11 delivered a two-socket world-record SPECvirt_sc2010 result of 4270 @ 264 VMs. This result demonstrates the superiority of Oracle’s SPARC T5 processors with Oracle Solaris virtualization and demonstrates the leadership SPARC servers provide in large-scale environments.

SPARC Customer Successes

Large Communications Provider utilizing the Oracle Optimized Solution for Enterprise Cloud Infrastructure, running on SPARC T5 Servers, realized 2.5x faster virtual server deployment versus bare metal for faster time-to-user and administrative productivity.

Regional Water Company realized 7x better cost/performance for virtualized Java, and 2x faster data warehouse performance and order-entry transactions than IBM running Oracle Solaris, Database, Applications and Middleware on SPARC T5 servers with Oracle VM for SPARC versus competitive systems.

Oil and Gas Company running Oracle Database, PeopleSoft, and SAP on Oracle SPARC T5 servers achieved 3x faster provisioning of new services and OPEX savings of $2.8M using Oracle VM for SPARC.

Oracle SPARC T5-2 Server


Utilizing modular design architecture and powered by either one or two SPARC T5 processors—Oracle’s most powerful SPARC processors ever—the SPARC T5-2 server delivers exceptional single- and multi-thread performance. With 16 cores and 16 memory slots per SPARC T5 processor, the SPARC T5-2 server provides extreme compute density, with up to 32 cores and 1 TB of system memory within a 3U enclosure. Oracle has also proven that the SPARC T5-2 is the fastest server for Java applications, which is critical in many cloud deployments. The SPARC T5-2 is 1.8x faster than the best Intel 2-chip x86 E5 v2 Ivy-Bridge-based Cisco UCS C240 M3 server.2

Conclusion
The SPARC T5 server running Oracle Solaris 11 utilizes embedded virtualization products, such as the Oracle VM Server for SPARC and Oracle Solaris Zones, which provide a low overhead, flexible, scalable and manageable virtualization environment with no extra cost for customers that have Oracle premier support.

For more information about SPARC and Solaris performance, please visit http://www.oracle.com/benchmarks.

Benchmark Disclosures
1) SPEC and the benchmark names SPECvirt_sc are registered trademarks of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Results from http://www.spec.org as of 3/6/2014. Solaris SPARC T5-2, SPECvirt_sc2010 4270 @ 264 VMs; VMware ESXi4.1 HP Proliant BL620c G7, SPECvirt_sc2010 1878 @ 120 VMs.

2) SPARC T5-2 114,492 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 43,963 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS; Cisco UCS C240 M3 63,079 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM max-jOPS, 23,797 SPECjbb2013-MultiJVM critical-jOPS.


This blog post is provided for information purposes only, and the contents hereof are subject to change without notice. This post is not warranted to be error-free, nor subject to any other warranties or conditions, whether expressed orally or implied in law, including implied warranties and conditions of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. We specifically disclaim any liability with respect to this document, and no contractual obligations are formed either directly or indirectly by this post. This post may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without our prior written permission.

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Intel and Intel Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. All SPARC trademarks are used under license and are trademarks or registered trademarks of SPARC International, Inc. AMD, Opteron, the AMD logo, and the AMD Opteron logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

Thursday Feb 13, 2014

Oracle Kicks Off "Oracle Systems: Enhancing Your Applications" Event Series

Oracle is kicking off a 17-city North American event series on how running Oracle Applications on Oracle hardware can help customers deliver maximum value and achieve dramatically better business results.

Watch Video - Oracle Systems: Together with Oracle Applications



The series kicks off February 19 in Nashville and February 20 in Toronto. Check the full list for a city near you and register today.

Oracle has engineered and optimized every layer of the underlying hardware and software to work together—so you can replace wait time with work time and get more out of your business. 
At the Oracle Systems: Enhancing Your Applications event, attendees will learn how they can:
  • Reduce costs and focus on innovation with superior Oracle ERP and CRM application and database performance
  • Improve time to value by adding new capabilities when you need them
  • Drive productivity and business value with Oracle Hardware systems and Oracle Optimized Solutions
  • Transform business processes with Oracle’s new In-Memory Applications for Oracle’s Engineered Systems

Monday Dec 23, 2013

Oracle Has a SPARC-powered Exadata Configuration Called SuperCluster

Oracle has been shipping a version of Oracle Exadata that runs Oracle’s T and M-series microprocessors for more than 2 years. This database machine is called Oracle SuperCluster.[Read More]

Thursday Oct 18, 2012

Consolidating Oracle E-Business Suite R12 on Oracle's SPARC SuperCluster

Oracle Optimized Solution for Oracle E-Business Suite (EBS) R12 12.1.3 is now available on oracle.com.

The Oracle Optimized Solution for Oracle E-Business Suite

This solution uses the SPARC SuperCluster T4-4, Oracle’s first multi-purpose engineered system.  Download the free business and technical white papers which provide significant relevant information and resources. 

What is an Optimized Solution?

Oracle Optimized Solutions are fully documented architectures that have been thoroughly tested, tuned and optimized for performance and availability across the entire stack on a target platform. The technical white paper details the deployed application architecture along with various observations from installing the application on target platform to its behavior and performance in highly available and scalable configurations.

Oracle E-Business Suite R12 and Oracle Database 11g

Multiple Oracle E-Business Suite  application modules were tested in this Oracle Optimized Solution -- Financials (online - Oracle Forms & Web requests), Order Management (online - Oracle Forms & Web requests) and HRMS (online - Web requests & payroll batch).

Oracle Solaris Cluster and Oracle Real Application Cluster deliver the the high availability on this solution. 

High Availability on SPARC SuperCluster

To understand the behavior of the architecture under peak load conditions, determine optimum utilization, verify the scalability of the solution and exercise high availability features, Oracle engineers tested the Oracle E-Business Suite and Oracle Database all running on a SPARC SuperCluster T4-4 engineered system. The test results are documented in the Oracle Optimized Solution white papers to provide general guidance for real world deployments. 

Questions & Requests

For more information, visit Oracle Optimized Solution for Oracle E-Business Suite page. If you are at a point where you would like to actually test a specific Oracle E-Business Suite application module on SPARC T4 systems or an engineered system such as SPARC SuperCluster, please contact Oracle Solution Center.

Thursday Oct 04, 2012

Bring 2 GB Large Pages to Solaris 10

Few facts:

  • 8 KB is the default page size on Oracle Solaris 10 and 11 as of this writing
  • Both hardware and software must have support for 2 GB large pages
  • SPARC T4 processors are capable of supporting 2 GB pages
  • Oracle Solaris 11 kernel has in-built support for 2 GB pages
  • Oracle Solaris 10 has no default support for 2 GB pages
  • Memory intensive 64-bit applications may benefit the most from using 2 GB pages

Prerequisites:

Steps to enable 2 GB large pages on Oracle Solaris 10:

  1. Install the latest kernel patch or ensure that 147440-04 or later was installed

  2. Add the following line to /etc/system and reboot
    • set max_uheap_lpsize=0x80000000

  3. Finally check the output of the following command when the system is back online
    • pagesize -a

    eg.,
    % pagesize -a
    8192		<-- 8K
    65536		<-- 64K
    4194304		<-- 4M
    268435456	<-- 256M
    2147483648	<-- 2G
    
    % uname -a
    SunOS jar-jar 5.10 Generic_147440-21 sun4v sparc sun4v
    

Also See:

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Oracle engineers hardware and software to work together in the cloud and in your data center. For more information about Oracle (NASDAQ:ORCL), visit www.oracle.com.

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