Thursday Oct 18, 2012

ADF Logging In Deployed Apps

Harking back to my series on using the ADF logger and the related  ADF Insider Video, I've had a couple of queries this week about using the logger from Enterprise Manager (EM). I've alluded in those previous materials to how EM can be used but it's evident that folks need a little help.  So in this article, I'll quickly look at how you can switch logging on from the EM console for an application and how you can view the output. 

Before we start I'm assuming that you have EM up and running, in my case I have a small test install of Fusion Middleware Patchset 5 with an ADF application deployed to a managed server.

Step 1 - Select your Application

In the EM navigator select the app you're interested in:


At this point you can actually bring up the context ( right mouse click) menu to jump to the logging, but let's do it another way. 

Step 2 - Open the Application Deployment Menu

At the top of the screen, underneath the application name, you'll find a drop down menu which will take you to the options to view log messages and configure logging, thus:


Step 3 - Set your Logging Levels 

Just like the log configuration within JDeveloper, we can set up transient or permanent (not recommended!) loggers here.


In this case I've filtered the class list down to just oracle.demo, and set the log level to config. You can now go away and do stuff in the app to generate log entries.

Step 4 - View the Output 

Again from the Application Deployment menu we can jump to the log viewer screen and, as I have here, start to filter down the logging output to the stuff you're interested in. 


In this case I've filtered by module name. You'll notice here that you can again look at related log messages.

Importantly, you'll also see the name of the log file that holds this message, so it you'd rather analyse the log in more detail offline, through the ODL log analyser in JDeveloper, then you can see which log to download.

About

Hawaii, Yes! Duncan has been around Oracle technology way too long but occasionally has interesting things to say. He works in the Development Tools Division at Oracle, but you guessed that right? In his spare time he contributes to the Hudson CI Server Project at Eclipse
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