Front-End Quiz Part 5, Users who Disable JavaScript


What's the best approach for dealing with the approximately 7 - 10% of visitors who disable JavaScript?

  1. Preemptively send them to a sorry, but you must activate JavaScript in order to use this site screen.

    Not a good way to make friends. This is like saying, "go away, we don't want you" or, "we only want 93% uptime for our website." I think the business case for this is rare indeed.

  2. Condition your plan on building it to work without JavaScript, then use JavaScript as an enhancement.

    I like this approach the best. This is known as the "progressive enhancement" method, and it's the best way to build bullet-proof websites in the modern age.

  3. For each feature needing JavaScript, use an inline this feature requires JavaScript <noscript> section.

    Still not very friendly. This is marginally better than blocking access to the whole site.

  4. Place a block of alternative content in a <noscript> section containing equivalent functionality.

    Workable, but inefficient. <noscript> functionality is really a suboptimal solution, since it requires you to basically code your functionality into the page twice.

  5. Just let certain features break, it's not really that big a deal.

    Possibly confusing. Not only do visitors not get the functionality they were looking for, now they're confused as well, without any explanation of why it won't work.

  6. Avoid using JavaScript in the first place.

    Maybe not the best, but it's an option. JavaScript offers a lot of capability that has come to be expected on the web. Your site might seem outdated without it.


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About

My name is Greg Reimer and I'm a web technologist for the Sun.COM web design team.

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