Download Best Practices, Part 2


I'm going to list three more of the download best practices that we encourage all our product teams to use as they develop products for electronic software distribution (ESD). This is the second part of a continuing series I'll publish from time to time. (You can see Part 1 here.) Some of these suggestions may seem like "no-brainers" (at least once you understand the basics of ESD), but they need to be stated and documented nonetheless and are certainly helpful to teams that are just starting out to prepare downloadable software.

1) Compress the files as much as possible. Obviously smaller files are cheaper/faster for everyone to download, and faster delivery means less time for things to fail and higher completion rates. Generally, we recommend using zip compression, as it's pretty much a de facto standard at this point (and is supported on Solaris OS as well). There are many free and open source distributions product teams can use, such as Info-ZIP, bzip2, and 7-Zip. You should experiment to see which one provides the best compression (in one test here, 7-Zip outperformed the others by about 20%, but your results may vary). There are also proprietary compression programs ("NOSSO," for example) that can greatly outperform "vanilla" zip compression, but they come with a price tag. If your download size really really matters, they may be worth investigating.

2) Use standard MIME types for file name extensions, for example "filename.zip" and "filename.exe." Web servers, browsers, download managers, and many other pieces of the Internet infrastructure rely on standard MIME types to ensure download transactions work correctly and consistently. So, don't release files without a MIME type extension (for ex., use "README.txt," not "README"), and don't make up file extensions or use non-standard ones, such as "filename.aa," "filename.bb," etc.

3) For large files, offer alternatives. Not everyone can successfully download a large file, especially ones larger than 2 GB. Other choices should be provided, such as a segmented ("chunked") version of the large file, CD images instead of a single DVD, and/or the option to order free or low cost CDs or DVDs. See my earlier post on "Breaking the Large File Barrier" for more details.


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About

I helped design, build, and manage download systems at Sun for many years. Recently I've focused on web eMarketing systems. Occasionally, I write about other interests, such as holography and jazz guitar. Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/garyzel

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